You'll get your Mac news here from now on...

Help TMO Grow

Subscriber Login

Advertising Info


The Mac Observer Express Daily Newsletter


More Info

Site Navigation

Home
News
Tips
Columns & Editorials
Reviews
Reports
Archives
Search
Forums
Links
Mac Links
Software
Reports
Contact




Fusion: The Game of the Future
February 12th, 1999

Randy: Well, Gerard, after our last free-for-all, journalistic, self-serving article, I think it's time we get back to the important topic we were hired to write about.

Gary: I agree completely, old boy. Roll out the browser and let's talk about online adult entertainment.

Randy: Uh, Gary, this is the Mac gaming column.

Gary: Oy, what you must think of me. Quite right…Macintosh gaming. Well, I'll just tuck this other little article away for now.

Randy: It looks like Gary has been researching other types of computer entertainment. What we are supposed to talk about today is the future of Macintosh gaming. Where is computer game entertainment heading? What is the next step for computer gaming?

Gary: I just hope I don't have to charge another $19.95 to my credit card to play it.

Randy: While I think online gaming is a big part of the future of gaming, I don't think the next big innovation will be about online games, per se.

Gary: Okay, I'll bite. What do you see for gamers in the near future?

Randy: I'm glad you asked. As you and I have talked about at great length, I have been waiting for the day when on-the-fly 3D graphics could match the beauty and clarity of pre-rendered graphics.

Gary: Boy, I know I sure have. And some of the spectacular titles that have come out this year have gone a long way toward crossing that line. Games like Unreal and Klingon Honor Guard (both built on the Unreal engine) have luscious graphics that almost equal the quality of phong-shaded graphics from a quality 3D program.

Randy: And these games have made progress in bringing the game back into the action.

Gary: I agree. For a while, the first-person shooter was the king of the hill in terms of game sales. Starting with Marathon and Doom, and all the way up to Quake and Hexen, the idea has been pretty much to kill everything you see. The plot lines were thin and contrived at best and the puzzle solving was reduced to maze running. But these types of titles have sold well. And to their credit, they were fun. For a while. But then the novelty wore off.

Randy: Then along came Unreal. Ground-breaking graphics plus a game engine that could handle more interaction other than shooting and picking up ammo.

Gary: Finally you could manipulate objects in the environment and use your brain as much as you used your gun.

Randy: What about titles like Dark Vengeance and Tomb Raider? You have great interactivity, wonderful puzzles that challenge even hard-core puzzle fans that usually played games like Myst and Riven, and you have skill and dexterity challenges like the old arcade games, but set in quality 3D environments. What more could you possible want from a game?

Gary: In a word, variety.

Randy: Exactly! No matter how creative a game maker gets with a new game engine, no matter how they improve on the model, it is still basically the same game. For example, in MDK, one of my favorites last year, you do have a variety of ways to travel in the game. You travel on foot most of the time, but there are times when you fly or surf or even ride inside stolen robots. But you are always in the same basic game. That's the way it has to be, right? You build a game in a certain engine and that's what you use from start to finish.

Gary: Why does a game have to be limited to one style of play? What if you could play a game where your character runs through a real time 3D world during fighting segments, like in Quake, but then could interact with digitized actors in a QuickTime layer in other areas of the game? Imagine if they made a new game based on Star Wars, for example. You could talk to a pilot in the cantina, negotiate a price, and get directions to the ship that will get you out of Mos Eisley.

Randy: That would be docking bay 94.

Gary: Uh, huh….Then you could walk to the docking bay using a VR engine, progressing through nodes and exploring the city until you found the ship that would help you escape.

Randy: That would be the Linoleum Falcon.

Gary: Laugh it up, fuzzball. But when you enter the docking bay, it's a setup! An Unreal-style engine takes over and you have to take out the Storm Troopers as you blast your way to the Falcon.

Randy: Now you're talking, dude! Then, in the same game you could crawl into the cockpit of the Falcon and the interior of the ship would be a pre-rendered ray-traced, point-and-click, exploratory-style interface. That part of the game would play like Riven or Timelapse. I envision the soundtrack changing as well, to more completely take you from the excitement of blasting enemies to the wonder of exploring a fantastic new area.

Gary: And then, after you explore the ship's interior, and figure out how the damn thing works, you strap yourself into the pilot's seat and take off. A flight sim engine takes over, and you fly the Falcon in a real-time combat mission, as you try to make the jump to lightspeed.

Randy: Keep in mind this is all in the same game! Sounds cool, huh?

Gary: We think so, too. We are talking about a fusion of game styles to give a totally free game environment, allowing the player several types of game experiences all within the same title.

Randy: We know all of you are saying to yourself, "But, guys, that would never work! All of those engines would never fit on a CD-ROM! It would be confusing! It would be too expensive! I'm scared!"

Gary: Never fear, timid readers. Next week, we will detail the technologies that will allow this future of gaming, and we will talk about how we would implement a game like this to really make it work.

Randy: I've got a bad feeling about this…

Gary Randazzo and Randy Soare are the co-founders of IWS Interactive, a New York based game developer for Macintosh. The IWS in IWS Interactive stands for Idiots With Sticks. How that came about is a long and boring story, but suffice it to say that at four in the morning, it seemed like a good idea.

The demo for IWS Interactive's upcoming mystery-adventure game, Manhattan Apartment Hunter, has recently been released to rave reviews. The Idiots have been into gaming on Apple computers even before the Mac was around. Does anyone remember Choplifter on the Apple IIe? (Boy, we know we do.) Now, they are committed to help ensure that the Mac remains the premiere gaming platform on the planet.

You can email your comment and suggestions to Randy at , and Gary at .


You can add your comments below.

Most Recent Columns From Wasting Time With The Idiots

Other "Wasting Time With The Idiots" Columns



Today's Mac Headlines

[Podcast]Podcast - Apple Weekly Report #135: Apple Lawsuits, Banned iPhone Ad, Green MacBook Ad

We also offer Today's News On One Page!

Yesterday's News

 

[Podcast]Podcast - Mac Geek Gab #178: Batch Permission Changes, Encrypting Follow-up, Re-Enabling AirPort, and GigE speeds

We also offer Yesterday's News On One Page!

Mac Products Guide
New Arrivals
New and updated products added to the Guide.

Hot Deals
Great prices on hot selling Mac products from your favorite Macintosh resellers.

Special Offers
Promotions and offers direct from Macintosh developers and magazines.

Software
Browse the software section for over 17,000 Macintosh applications and software titles.

Hardware
Over 4,000 peripherals and accessories such as cameras, printers, scanners, keyboards, mice and more.

© All information presented on this site is copyrighted by The Mac Observer except where otherwise noted. No portion of this site may be copied without express written consent. Other sites are invited to link to any aspect of this site provided that all content is presented in its original form and is not placed within another .