Adobe: Goodbye, Boxed Software

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Adobe has confirmed that it is phasing out boxed versions of its software in favor of online downloads and Creative Cloud sales. The change shouldn't come as a big surprise since Adobe has been pushing customers to electronic-only purchases for some time, and with the launch of Creative Suite 6 has been urging all customers to move to its subscription-based app service.

Adobe finally killing off boxed software optionsAdobe finally killing off boxed software options

After resellers began saying boxed Creative Suite sales would end on May 1, Adobe confirmed to TechHive that the traditional boxed DVD option was going away. A company spokesperson stated, "As Adobe continues to focus on delivering world-class innovation through Creative Cloud and digital fulfillment, we will be phasing out shrink-wrapped, boxed versions of Creative Suite and Acrobat products."

Software downloads instead of traditional disc-based purchases has been a growing trend for years, and can be a big money saver for developers since they can cut down on physical material purchases as well as printing costs. In this case, it means Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, and the rest of the Creative Suite apps will no longer be available on disc, which probably isn't that big of a deal for most Mac owners since Apple has been phasing out its optical drives as well.

For Adobe app users that need a disc-based installer, now would be a good time to buy since boxed copies of Creative Suite 6 are about to become scarce.

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Comments

Lee Dronick

I wish that they would put them in the Apple App Store, if Apple would allow it, and in the process doing away their pain in the port of activation.

sflocal

I’m okay with online distribution.  In the end, it’s inevitable.  I would use the CD’s once to install it, then they gather dust and storage somewhere.

I always copied the CD’s to a NAS server for archiving and never touched the original one again.

I’m using their Creative Cloud option as the deal I got was too good to pass up considering I get access to their entire suite.  The only bad thing is that it’s a continuing subscription and not a one-time purchase for the software.

I’m in the middle with that model.  I always liked being current with software as I update my tools every couple years anyways, but the thought of knowing that if I don’t pay, my tools become inactive is not something I’m used to.  This is my first subscription software so I see how it goes.

Troy Boy

The idea of paying a subscription is horrible for the casual user. I may be a heavy user one day, then not open it for weeks months, yet all the while I am paying for something I don’t use.

I really don’t need the latest versions of CS, I am usually three-four years behind the upgrade cycle, which is perfect for my needs,\.

Lee Dronick

“The idea of paying a subscription is horrible for the casual user. I may be a heavy user one day, then not open it for weeks months, yet all the while I am paying for something I don’t use.

I really don’t need the latest versions of CS, I am usually three-four years behind the upgrade cycle, which is perfect for my needs”

I am in a similar situation these days. I am still using CS4 and it fills the bill until I find replacements for all of them.

I dumped DreamWeaver and am using Coda. Pages instead of inDesign though I miss some features of the later. I am doing most photo adjustments in Aperture, but PhotoShop for things that need layers and such. I am fixing to buy iDraw to replace Illustrator. I am looking for a good substitute for PhotoShop.

xmattingly

Pushing to a download-only sales model doesn’t make sense when you factor in consumer choice. Like… not having the latest bug-riddled version forced down your throat?

Which for standalone software wouldn’t be too big of a deal, but we’re talking about roughly TEN GIGABITS of software. People who live in the sticks or only have satellite internet are screwed… believe it or not, rural America still exists. So long, customers with slow internet connections!

KitsuneStudios

I wonder if companies like Adobe will move to Print-on-demand DVDs instead, but the price savings on skipping physical media, printed packaging, and the retail chain are probably far greater than the loss of sales in rural North America.

I’ve also gone to the Creative Cloud, which based on my pricing, is actually a superior deal for the next 6 years compared to my older strategy, especially now that it costs more to upgrade from older versions.

Lee Dronick

“Which for standalone software wouldn’t be too big of a deal, but we’re talking about roughly TEN GIGABITS of software. People who live in the sticks or only have satellite internet are screwed… believe it or not, rural America still exists. So long, customers with slow internet connections!”

They may have some sort of offer for people in that situation, remember Apple and the OS X download only.

ctopher

This will also stop people from selling their media on EBay.

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