Android to iPhone: Mine is Bigger

| Editorial

Customers in the mobile phone market think differently than those who are buying a conventional computer, Mac or PC. Apple understands that completely, but from the approach the Android phone makers are taking, it’s clear they are clueless about a long-term strategy.

I think it’s amusing, indeed hilarious, that the competitors to the iPhone, with their recent behemoth Android phones, are repeating the same mistakes that Apple made in the PC wars of the previous two decades.

Lessons of History

You must have lived through that era to remember the approach Apple was taking. Apple was first out of the block with it’s beautiful 15-inch LCD studio display in 1998. Apple’s Mac OS GUI was clearly superior from 1984 until Windows 95 came out. We had AppleTalk, we had laser printers. We moved to 3.5-inch floppies much sooner than the laggard PC industry. In 2001, we got a UNIX OS.

As a result, there was the general feeling that we Apple customers were cutting edge and PC users were, with gracious respect, retards. I.T. managrs took it personally.

Initially, Apple had a good representation in the enterprise thanks to its advanced UI, but over time, Apple’s direction and Microsoft’s astuteness nullified Apple’s technical advantages. The enterprise, with help from Microsoft, came to have a new agenda: control, standardization, low cost, risk avoidance, multiple sources to obtain low cost bidders, and not too much dazzle to distract the cubicle workers.

I remember, at WWDC, somewhere around 1996, chatting with Apple V.P. David Nagel. I was with Lockheed Martin, and we desperately needed pre-emptive multive tasking (re-entrant APIs) in the OS and user login/authentication and access logs at the very least. I asked if Apple was headed there, and he just shrugged. Apple wouldn’t kowtow to business. Shortly thereafter, my company, with breathtaking speed, dumped 3,500 Macs and went 100 percent to Windows NT. Other big companies did the same in the late 1990s.

The culture of a Apple blinded them, and they lost a big market. Apple just about died.  Meanwhile, Microsoft was checking every box the I.T. Manager needed checked: servers, enterprise tools, e-mail, authentication, a memory protected, pre-emptive multi-tasking OS (WinNT), web site tools, compilers, databases, the works.

Flash Forward

Today, Apple has turned the tables on the mobile phone makers. Apple understands the consumer mentality and also understands the needs of the enterprise when it comes to phones and tablets. Apple doesn’t make a big fuss about specs, but when it does publish specs for its iPhone, it provides what the customer needs to know in a way they can understand it.

When I look at some of the modern Android phones, I see an attempt to outdo Apple in terms of specifications that only appeal to the geekier users. The new Motorola Droid Bionic & RAZR and the Samsung Galaxy Nexus are rather large. With a padded case, they’ll be huge. The displays are in the 4.3 to 4.6 inch range compared to the iPhone’s 3.5 inch. The batteries must be larger to help with a larger display plus a pre-emptive surge to 4G/LTE. The Nexus has a barometer, NFC and a whopping 1280 x 720 (720p) display. Yesterday, Asus announced its Transformer tablet with a quad core processor. It seems to me that the competition is throwing every hardware technology it can at customers, hoping to slow down the popularity of Apple’s mobile devices.

iPhone vs BionicRelative sizes, within a few pixels.

Customer Mentality

Meanwhile, it was reported yesterday by Ralph de la Vega with AT&T that the free iPhone 3GS, a rather obsolete phone, is outselling every Android phone. Why? Having an iPhone, a free iPhone, being cool and having what your friends have, and being able to to take it to the Apple store to buy a case or get it fixed is just a superior customer experience. Spending US$300 on a feature-laden, largish smartphone isn’t where a lot of customers are these days.

What’s more, a big phone is a man’s phone. A geek phone. It barely fits in the shirt pocket when in a case. It doesn’t seem so miniaturized. It’s not discreet. It’s this giant Newton-like, heavy hunk of plastic that demonstrates to other geeks that your phone is bigger, brighter, has more ports and features and is more powerful than other phones. Where does it go? In the backpack or in a giant belt holster.

Apple knows that many of its younger users want a small phone that fits easily in the hand. It should be light, easy to handle and not take up a lot of room in briefcase, pocket or purse. Smaller and lighter is better. Cooler. Plus, the iPhone has better infrastructure: Curation of apps, a great App Store and retail stores. It’s cool because it’s fun and easy to use. It’s like a sparking jewel in the hand.

Nip and Tuck

Don’t take this wrong.  The Android phones are selling well. I just think it’s amazing that the iPhone’s competitors are repeating the same mistakes that Apple made in the 1990s in a very crucial war. Given that Android is under considerable pressure in the courts for patent infringement and that some smartphone makers are having second thoughts about Android, this platform can’t afford to make any strategic mistakes or engage in any doubts or infighting. Apple has a crisp notion of where to go, and they’re a single company with a single focus. Emphasizing, to excess, specs and features that are hard to embrace in this consumer market isn’t a good long-term strategy.

 

 

 

Comments

Lee Dronick

Apple knows that many of its younger users want a small phone that fits easily in the hand. It should be light, easy to handle and not take up a lot of room in briefcase, pocket or purse.

There is a sweet spot for the size of any gadget in a category. If the phone gets too big then it is too big for pocket convenience and one hand use, but too small for a tablet. I will withhold judgement on the Droid Bionic’s size until such time as can try one out.

mhikl

John, stop giving away trade secretes. The idiots are listening, (and I mean that in the nicest way). However, iDroiders (and my i has a different meaning from the Apple i) are too obsessed with “we know what” to figger it out, so blast away with the Apple secrets.

I like the word that begins with re but I use tards instead as it has less history and still gets the point across.

Oh, the brilliance of slight of phrase:
not too much dazzle to distract the cubicle workers- thankfully, a laundry was in first cycle to catch that one.
- In the backpack or in a giant belt holster. Maybe a slight change in shape with a barrel might be a great iDroid innovation and useful for extra battery space.

I was getting worried that maybe Apple had missed out on the macho aspect though I tempered such thought with, “it’s a mobile phone, for heaven’s sake!”

Lee Dronick

I was getting worried that maybe Apple had missed out on the macho aspect though I tempered such thought with, ?it?s a mobile phone, for heaven?s sake!?

Just get a mil spec iPhone case like this one from Griffin.

John Martellaro

mhikl. On the belt holster, I had a sentence in there that I deleted at the last moment: “Or a shoulder holster with a large black ominous .45 auto”)

mhikl

Too cool Lee. Where do you find the time? for all this neat stuff.

Darn, John! Back to the laundry.

mrmwebmax

+

John,

Agree completely with the size issue. I have the iPhone 4, and (as I’ve said before) just love the form factor. It just feels right in my hand (I’m a guy with big hands), and fits comfortably in a pocket. Meanwhile, I can just imagine Mae West walking up to an Android user and saying, “Is that a Droid Bionic in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?)

wilf53

Yes, the thing about it being a man’s phone nails it. My daughter is quite geeky and although she would like to have a Mac (and I would like to afford to give her one:) she would never have an iPhone, she says - they are too big and clumsy for her! Imagine then how she regards these biggies:)

Lee Dronick

Too cool Lee. Where do you find the time? for all this neat stuff.

I saw that on webpage advert, here I think. I thought that it would be good for hikers, construction and such.

As to holsters. I was thinking of an ammo pouch, but nothing i have from my gunning days was the right size. When wearing slacks I usually put my iPhone in the pocket. With jeans I carry it in a leather pouch that looks like it was designed for a small camera. Most iPhone pouch cases have too tight tolerances, the one I use has some slack.

Meanwhile, I can just imagine Mae West walking up to an Android user and saying, ?Is that a Droid Bionic in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?”

Ot Lily Von Shtupp saying “Is it true what they say about how you Droids are…gifted?”

skipaq

While shopping for my wife’s 4s at Radio Shack, I made it a point to look at the various Android offerings. There was a large selection of way too big phones for my tastes. There were several that were in the same size range as an iPhone; but they didn’t have all the specs of the larger ones. I still prefer the form factor of the iPhone 4, 4s.

Nemo

What you see with too many Android phones is simply dumb product differentiation.  In a desperate effort to best Apple’s iPhone and each other—even more each other than the iPhone—Android phones parade any difference in their product as though it is the defining feature of a smartphone, such as display size, processor speed, RAM, etc., but none of those features make any significant improvement in user’s experience, and some even detract from the user’s experience, though they may win some initial sales.  Thus, we have dumb product differentiation, which may work with some users in the short term, but once the user has frustrating experience with the dumb differentiating feature or with the overall experience of the their Android phone, they are ready to try an iPhone.  And for those that can compare their iPhone to their Android phone, their movement to the iPhone is even quicker, and that was before Siri, the A5 chip with the best graphics performance of any ARM smartphone CPU/GPU, and the iPhone 4S’s new camera, which has been nearly universally reviewed as the best camera on a smartphone.

Apple goes about things very differently; instead of dumb, irrelevant, mine is bigger than your feature comparisons, Apple ignores the focus on specific features—And this is another instance of Jony Ive and the late Steve Jobs’ brilliance—but focuses instead on the innovation, selection of features, and design that will provide the best user’s experience for most users.  The result is a device that customers and reviewers alike find delightful both for reasons that they can articulate and because of a delightful magic that they can’t articulate.  It is that focus on how to design, how and what to innovate, what to put in, and what to leave out so that the product will produce a great and significantly better user’s experience is how Apple goes about it. 

Specific features of an Apple device or service, even when superior in specs, don’t much matter for Apple.  The A5 chip is arguably the fastest smartphone chip and certainly has the best graphics performance.  But do you hear Apple boasting about that as a feature of the iPhone?  No, you don’t.  Ditto for the specs for the sensor in the iPhone 4S’s camera.  The vast majority of consumers would understand the physics of the sensor in any event.  And Siri probably execute searches faster.  But once again Apple’s marketing, particularly its ads, ignore comparing specs but instead focuses on the experience that you’ll have with Siri or the new camera or the enhanced graphics, because that is the thing, the only thing, that matters to most consumers and is the only thing that will matter to nearly all consumers in the long run.

Now, whose is bigger? I can tell you.  Jony Ive has the biggest.

eolake

It’s funny, in your roundup you just linked to an article saying Windows phone OS is better. One of his best points were bigger screens. And here you are, saying the opposite.

IPhone 4 is great, but the keyboard is barely usable, too small screen.
The iPhone 4 is a good ereader, but with a 5-inch screen it would be a great ereader.

Nemo

Dear eolake:  Jony Ive’s design and design choices lost you but wins nearly everyone else, so you cant’ win them all.  Enjoy your Android phone.

Peter

Meanwhile, it was reported yesterday by Ralph de la Vega with AT&T that the free iPhone 3GS, a rather obsolete phone, is outselling every Android phone.

Oh My God!  You’re telling me that a free phone is outselling phones that actually cost money?  What an achievement!  Now we know how Apple can compete against Android!  Give away phones!  What a great idea!

skipaq

Now we know how Apple can compete against Android!? Give away phones!? What a great idea!

Unless my math fails me, the 3gs would also be outselling any given Android phone that is sold “free.” The 3gs and the 4 will simply broaden the market reach of the iPhone.

Nemo

No, Peter:  Mr. de la Vega said that the two year old iPhone 3Gs is outselling all non-iPones, both the free, low-end Android phones and the advanced top-of-line Android phones.  So Apple’s two year old iPhone 3GS is wiping the asses of free and expensive Android phones alike.

John Martellaro

Readers: you should know that Eolake and I have known each other for a decade and I hold him in high esteem.

Eolake: Over at Particle Debris I point to articles that I think will be of technical interest, food for thought. I distinguish between arguments I make in editorials like this one and P.D. where various points of view by other authors are frequently offered.

Of course, I often editorialize on the links found at P.D. for the sake of clarification or to make a point. I don’t specifically look for articles for P.D. that support my own viewpoint—although when I find them, I like them a lot.

mhikl

?free?, of course, means you pay through a certain orifice for the right of ?free?.

Peter

Mr. de la Vega said that the two year old iPhone 3Gs is outselling all non-iPones, both the free, low-end Android phones and the advanced top-of-line Android phones.

I’m not sure we’re reading that the same way.

It seems that the iPhone 3GS handset is out-selling every Android handset.  It is not outselling all Android handsets.  So, for example, if AT&T was selling 25 iPhone 3GS handsets, 17 Samsung Galaxy II S handsets, and 12 HTC Incredible handsets, then the iPhone 3GS would be outselling every Android handset because 25 is more than 17 and 25 is more than 12.  Conversely, if AT&T was selling 30 iPhone 3GS handsets, 17 Samsung Galaxy IIS’, and 12 HTC Incredibles, then the iPhone 3GS handset would be selling more than all Android handsets because 30 is more than 29.

Unfortunately, I cannot seem to find an actual reference to what Mr. de la Vega said.  Does anyone have a link?

Rhonin

Reading these I do have to chuckle.
3G to 3GS to 4 to SGS2 - why?
I wanted 4G and a 4”+ screen.  After getting the phone I set it up just like my JB i4.
Excluding SIRI, I have a phone that outperforms, has a better display, faster downloads, better battery and more functionality - there are some awesome widgets.
When I pull my i4 back out and compare side by side, I realize how limited the i4 really is. 
Sorry folks, in some cases, bigger is better and this is one.
They say choice is good.  I am really enjoying mine.

Lee Dronick

What in the hell is an i4 and a SGS2?

Mark

Apple knows that many of its younger users want a small phone that fits easily in the hand. It should be light, easy to handle and not take up a lot of room in briefcase, pocket or purse.

My Android is actually smaller than any iPhone and thats the reason i got it despite from some other features the iPhone doesn’t have (Waterproof, scratchproof, doesnt break when dropped)

It’s clear that Apple will become a niche again by their own choice. One size fits all just gets you so far.

Just try to get a decent docking station, 30 hours battery life, a second harddrive (without sacrificing dvd) or something similar to thinklight on a macbook. This is actually very useful stuff for some people.

mhikl

They say choice is good.? I am really enjoying mine.

Choice rules, Rhonin. Why do so many persist in their way is the only way.

I wouldn?t want a large phone, but I have friends with big hands or thick fingers and who find a small screen disagreeable and the iPad too big to bother carrying round, so a large phone is the best of both worlds for them. I?m a tall slim guy and my fingers work well on an iPhone and with great eye sight, the display is perfect for me. I would wonder that at some point if Apple wouldn?t think about also bringing out a larger second model.

Another curious thought, what size would be too big?

Lee Dronick

Mark I didn’t say that. I was quoting from the article. This is what I wrote in my post:

“There is a sweet spot for the size of any gadget in a category. If the phone gets too big then it is too big for pocket convenience and one hand use, but too small for a tablet. I will withhold judgement on the Droid Bionic?s size until such time as can try one out.”

Yes, of course a smart phone can be too big for someone’s hands, it is the up to the individual to decide what fits them best. It is also up to of the individual to decide what mobile OS best fits their needs. I like the iOS, I wouldn’t trade my iPhone for a Circassian concubine.

mhikl

It?s clear that Apple will become a niche again by their own choice. One size fits all just gets you so far.

Mark are you a tard or just picking fights. Choice rules and I, among many, are truly pleased you found what is right for your needs. Since you have such, why let envy rule your life.

mhikl

I wouldn?t trade my iPhone for a Circassian concubine.

Now that is clever and too funny. I?ve heard the Circassian women are stunning.

Rhonin

Lee - i4 = iPhone 4, SGS2 = Samsung Galaxy S2

Rhonin

mhiki - I tried out the Dell Streak at 5” and that was a bit much for my larger hands.
I found with the Samsung Galaxy S2 I can easily one hand text.  Slightly slimmer and wider than the i4.

For the display, I was surprised at how much better the Galaxy looked than the iPhone 4 even though the 4 has a higher resolution.

Like the iPhone, just didn’t fit what I needed.
Maybe the mythicaL 5….

wab95

Emphasizing, to excess, specs and features that are hard to embrace in this consumer market isn?t a good long-term strategy.


It is not even a good short-term strategy, John. They are fighting the wrong war (like bombing Baghdad to hurt Al-Qa’ida - no political statement here, just a consensus point of fact).

The PC wars enjoyed one advantage no longer available in the smartphone wars, which, like urban warfare vs the WWII battlefields of Europe, is faster, more nimble, more nuanced and higher risk proposition than the tech wars of yesteryear. The advantage combatants had in the PC wars was the ‘fog of naivet?’ on the part of both the enterprise and consumers, a fog which, because it relatively blinded parties trying to navigate their way through to an uncertain future with products unprecedented in human history, induced no small amount of fear, panic and herd-like behaviour in both the enterprise and the private consumer. Among consumers particularly, as the enterprise made strategic decisions, which you clearly detail above, there was a tendency to follow enterprise for reasons of compatibility, cost and fear of being left behind or simply left out in the cold.

Consumers are no longer tech-naive. There is no fog surrounding the smartphone space. People know why they want a smartphone, and are driven by a broader agenda in their selection of hardware and software package than specs alone. Importantly, a substantial fraction (I have argued before that it is the largest fraction) of consumers are purchasing not simply a phone but a digital solution that allows them to integrate their heretofore disparate personal and business lives. And here then is the fundamental difference between the PC wars and the smartphone wars that should inform strategy; the market driver is not the enterprise this time around, it is the private consumer. Apple have changed the terms of engagement. The enterprise uptake patterns are following, indeed largely being driven by, private consumer behaviour and the demand of senior-level staff to use their iDevices at work. One device. One solution. Done.

The only viable strategy, with somewhat different objectives for the short and long-term, is to thus provide the consumer, who then becomes the enterprise advocate and change agent, with a complete solution that is superior to that of the competition - in a word - the best user experience. Any other thought needs to leave the boardroom. Now. And if all chairs empty out, and nothing remains, then that’s all they’ve got for this fight. Nothing.

wab95

On the belt holster, I had a sentence in there that I deleted at the last moment: ?Or a shoulder holster with a large black ominous .45 auto?)

You should’ve kept it. Surgically snarky.

Meanwhile, I can just imagine Mae West walking up to an Android user and saying, ?Is that a Droid Bionic in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?)

A palpable hit! I nearly choked on my morning coffee.

JonGl

IPhone 4 is great, but the keyboard is barely usable, too small screen.
The iPhone 4 is a good ereader, but with a 5-inch screen it would be a great ereader.

I’ve played with Androids with bigger screens, and even on their bigger screen, the Android keyboard is horribly cramped and overly-crowded, and unusable. The iPhone keyboard is much better in every way, and even the autocorrect is better, in my experience. I know people will reply that you can replace the Android keyboard, or use Swype, etc. but the fact that such things are considered necessary shows how bad the default one is. I have never had that same impression with the iPhone keyboard, that I wished I could change it. I have looked at it side-by-side with Android, and by itself, and I can’t see hardly any way to improve it.

-Jon

Rhonin

JonGI
Not sure which one you tried but the keyboard on my old Nexus One and my current Galaxy S2 is every bit as good as the iPhone.
One aspect I like better on Android is the spell check.
On the iPhone if a correction was suggested you had to decline the correction else your word was replaced.  I had more than a few emails/texts messed up.  Had to turn it off.  Sending emails to a client or boss and you cannot afford some of the suggested replacements.
On Android it suggests and you can select it if you want.  Plus I imported my personal dictionary from my pc into Android and added it to my dictionary.  Nice!!!!

Btw - Swype is not a “you have to have” on Android.  I will say my daughter uses it and can email, type, text on hers faster than anyone could on an iPhone without it.

JonGl

Not sure which one you tried but the keyboard on my old Nexus One and my current Galaxy S2 is every bit as good as the iPhone.

The _first_ time I ever noticed the difference was a Nexus One of my friend’s( he works for Google, and I saw it while it was still a rumor), and he and I both noticed this difference between the two. Next, I’ve seen it on my Son’s Samsung, and a couple others, including a Moto, Samsung, and I forget what else. What the difference is is simple, there are more keys, and they are more crowded and narrower than on the iPhone—which makes hitting the wrong key easier. I have yet one person, when I’ve shown them the two side-by-side, who didn’t prefer the iPhone over their own Android. Oh, and my brother bought himself an Android with a bigger screen, and couldn’t stand it so much, he took it back, and switched to an iPhone 4. And he is _not_ an Apple fanboi—quite the opposite, but he is now an iPhone fanboi. wink And a good part of that is its keyboard.

I suspect, in fact, that part of the reason for the push for larger screens on Android is the keyboard, as well as poor use of space (plus, I suspect that a whoooole lot of Android fans are aging geeks of my generation, who find they need a larger screen just to read what’s on it) wink

-Jon

P.S. If you like Android, don’t think I’m trying to convince you otherwise, or degrade Android fans or even Android. I even spent a few hundred buying my son his Android phone. I’m no enemy of Android. I just call what I see…

Rhonin

JonGI… Chuckle
Not at all.
I am a tech user - I use what I need.  iPhone4 was, Galaxy S2 currently is.
Typing this on an iPad2.
Interestingly, I am looking at my S2 and i4 and in portrait and landscape they have exactly the same number of keys in email and text.
Which I could check my Nexus but it died.?. :(
Might be a Samsung tweak.  I ll have to look later today.

Lee Dronick

I suspect, in fact, that part of the reason for the push for larger screens on Android is the keyboard, as well as poor use of space (plus, I suspect that a whoooole lot of Android fans are aging geeks of my generation, who find they need a larger screen just to read what?s on it)

Yeah, I will be 61 in a little over a month. However, I also feel that the large size also appeals to gamers who are generally younger than us Baby Boomers.

JonGl

I am a tech user - I use what I need.? iPhone4 was, Galaxy S2 currently is.
Typing this on an iPad2.
Interestingly, I am looking at my S2 and i4 and in portrait and landscape they have exactly the same number of keys in email and text.

I’d be curious to know if Samsung has modified, but honestly, the phones I’ve all seen were probably Android 2.0 or earlier, and possibly one 2.1 (the Moto), but it’s the key shape that was different. iPhone was wider, and, IIRC, more space between as well. I think my Moto-using friend pointed that out to me.

-Jon

LDMartin1959

“...there was the general feeling that we Apple customers were cutting edge ...”

As a new Mac user (and escapee from the PC world after a period of over 20 years), I would say that this is absolutely true.

“...and PC users were, with gracious respect, retards….”

As a new Mac user (and escapee from the PC world after a period of over 20 years), I would say that this is generally true.

“...I.T. managrs took it personally…”

I.T. takes everything personally. Which is why so many I.T. departments are pushing Linux (Billy G and Redmond have offended them) and why in 10-15 years they will be pushing something else, because someone in the Linux community will have offended them.

imonaboat

This could easily be the most biased review I’ve ever seen. Let’s see here, any reason why Android is DOMINATING iPhone in sales? Let me spell that out for you D-O-M-I-N-A-T-I-N-G. OBVIOUSLY Android is doing something correctly if they have such a large market share. Nobody gives two sh**s about the new iOS, because its all OLD news to us Android users. Every bit of it has been in use by an Android for a great deal of time. The ONLY reason why there are so many iPhone users is due to people jumping on the bandwagon and wanting to be like the rest of everyone else and their little brother. Most people are too stupid to even use an Android phone which is reason enough for them not to purchase one.

Pick up an Android phone today, test it out for 30 minutes, get to know the UI, the OS, the animations, and the live wallpapers and tell me you wouldn’t like to have that on your little simplistic iPhone. Customization is key here and Android saw it first. Have fun customizing ONLY the background images.

BB 8900—> iPhone 3G—> Inspire 4G

Three different OS’s before I found which one I was happy with.

LDMartin1959

Most people are too stupid to even use an Android phone which is reason enough for them not to purchase one.

Ignoring your ignorance and arrogance (not to mention your own stupidity) most reports are that Androids have a much higher failure rate that iPhones. Between my kids, my wife and I we have had about half a-dozen Android devices and most of them have had significant issues right out of the box, or developed them over a short period of time. I don’t know of anyone who has an iPhone that has experienced the sort of trouble we have had with Android products.

And no, we are not stupid. I’ve been involved with computers (PC’s) for over 20 years. I started using them when they were still called IBM-compatibles (a term with which you may not be familiar, if you are the typical Android fan) running DOS (another term with which you may not be familiar, if you are the typical Android fan).

As for Android dominating smart phone sales….You want to redo your math. There are…what…probably close to 4-dozen Android smart phone products currently available. How much market share does each one of them have separately? Now, compare that to iPhone sales. The iPhone (which it could be argued is a single phone, albeit available with three different memory configurations) holds nearly 20% of the market. And the best Android can do—with all it’s phones from all it’s makers—is only 50% of the market? You call that dominating?? I call it pathetic.

Nemo

Dear Peter:  Here’s a my citation to Mr. de la Vega’s comment, infra:

“AT&T is seeing an unprecedented uptake of the iPhone 3GS after price cuts and just recently going free on contract, the company’s wireless head Ralph de la Vega said during a call discussing summer results. There was still “tremendous demand” for the now two-year-old phone to the point where inventory was being sold out. It was also the phone of choice for more new customers than any non-iPhone device.”

You are correct in saying that Apple’s two year old iPhone 3GS isn’t outselling all Android phones combined, or at least that is not what Mr. de la Vega said.  However, it will be cold comfort to Google and its Android OEM vassals that the iPhone 3GS, in outselling any non-iPhones, is outselling any of the latest and premium Android phones and any of the cheap, free Android toasters on AT&T’s network.  This means that on AT&T’s network, the days of Android OEM’s strategy of selling cheap Android junk to get market share are over.  It also means that Apple’s two year old iPhone 3GS is beating the best that Android has to offer on AT&T’s network, without even accounting for the sale of the iPhone 4 and the iPhone 4S.  I suspect that we will see the same thing on Sprint and Verizon.  If you are Google and its Android OEM vassals, this devastating stuff. 

And it is even more devastating for Google, because market share, and not its Android OEMs’ profits or lack thereof, is the primary concern.  Market share on orthodox Android phones, that is, not forked Android phones, is how Google distributes its services on Android phones, which are the source of its profits and, thus, are both reason for even doing Android and the source of revenue for subsidizing free Android.  Therefore, that Apple’s two year old iPhone 3GS is out selling any Android phone by itself shows that the entire Android ecosystem is suffering at least a serious, if not devastating, blow. 

And this is before accounting for the runaway sales of the iPhone 4 and the iPhone 4S, where sales of the iPhone 4S are occurring at such a rapid pace that Apple can’t meet demand even though it stockpiled million of iPhone 4Ss before introducing it and is making more as fast as it possibly can.  In fact, Tim Cook, who is a master of operations, could not predict when Apple’s supply of iPhone 4Ss would meet demand.  My guess is that iPhone 4S won’t meet demand until sometime after this holiday season in the first Quarter of next year.  And then, Apple is likely to have a nice Siri enabled, A6 equipped iPad 3 surprise for Google and its Android partners.

But don’t worry, because there is a good chance that Android won’t have to compete with Apple’s iOS devices for very long in 2012, because the courts or other tribunal may well have either enjoined the sale and distribution of Android devices in the United States and elsewhere or entered judgment or sanctioned a settlement that will impose such royalties on Android that the Android OEMs will be flocking to Windows Phone and any other viable alternative mobile OS.

JonGl

the animations, and the live wallpapers and tell me you wouldn?t like to have that on your little simplistic iPhone.

Ah, the toys—the little gewgaws. This desire for toys is a clear indication of the age appeal of the phone, and its users. I understand the post now (as if the arrogant, simplistic tone didn’t already give a clear indication of the level of maturity).

I’m curious, though, what, exactly, is the market share of the Inspire 4G. I wonder how it compares to the 16GB version of the iPhone 4S? This would be an interesting comparison, and one more telling.

-Jon

P.S. And again, I have nothing personal against the Inspire or other Android phones. It’s the attitude behind those who have to justify their purchase by denigrating the iPhone, and ignoring some simple truths (which John has kindly pointed out in this article)

Lee Dronick

Well there is difference between the market share of a particular device and of an operating system so there may very well be more Androids out there than iOS phones. However, we Apple users have been down this road before and it doesn’t matter to us what is the most popular OS. There intangibles to choosing things that are hard to define, maybe us artistic types are just “drawn” to Apple for reasons unfathomable to tech types.

Gotta run some errands with the wife. I am going to try messing with some Android phones while she is shopping for mom jeans.

wilf53

Most people are too stupid to even use an Android phone which is reason enough for them not to purchase one.

What I find amusing is how this also has been an argument among many Windows-users when they want to put Mac-users in place. The funny thing about it, is that they first accuse Mac-users of being arrogant and condescent and the next thing you know is that they accuse people who have problems with Windows - and now Android, obviously - for being too stupid to handle it, assuming that one would need a certain level of technical knowledge to use it.

Now, we are talking about consumer products here and not products aimed at and meant for professionals. I would say that if a consumer product requires a high level of technical insight to be used properly, it has failed.

I cannot say whether Android-phones have failed, since I never have used one, but I am quite happy with the fact that my iPhone doesn’t require any geekery on my behalf to work:D That’s what I expect from a phone. And no, I do not feel any desperate need to tweek it and fiddle with it, no more than I feel such an urge regarding my car. I want it to start when I turn the ignition and to function safely and take me where I want to go.

If the way it does so, is in a smooth and well-functioning fashion I am happy and content. Simple as that.

If Android-owners feel that way, that is good. That is how I feel as an iPhone-owner:)

Nemo

And for all this crap about diplay’s size, Apple has carefully considered what is the optimal size display for a smartphone.  (John Gruber at Daring Fireball has written persuasively on this, though I could not immediately locate the citation.)  In making that determination, Apple could have made a smartphone with a display that is 4.3 to 4.6 inches.  After all, there is no patent on screen size, at least not in this context, and Apple certainly has the ability to make a larger display for the iPhone and has the ability to make different iPhones with different size displays.  And yet Steve Jobs and/or Tim Cook stuck with the 3.5” screen on the iPhone 4S.  And the reasons for that are dispositive:  (1) the iPhone’s technology of expanding letters as your finger hovers over them effectively increases the display’s size for the purpose of typing to the maximum practical screen size, and does so more effectively than actually increasing the screen’s size; (2) The iPhone’s zoom technology expands the ability to view content and elements on a smartphone’s displays to the maximum practical size of display and does so more effectively than actually increasing the size of the display; and (3) Increasing the display’s size, while providing very little practical benefit that can’t be more effectively obtained by the technologies described, supra, loses all of the benefits of the iPhone’s 3.5 inch display, such as, inter alia, how well it fits in the hand, one thumb reach for most people to any part of the display, easily, if not inconspicuously, fitting into pockets, purses, cases, etc.

So because Apple designs for the best user’s experience, rather than for dumb product differentiation (See my intial comment, supra.) or short-term, quick sales that ultimately leave the consumer disappointed, Apple is for now sticking with the 3.5 inch display on all of its iPhones.  However, if the future indicates that consumers prefer a larger displays or, more importantly, if comes to past that a large display will provide a better user’s experience, given all of the considerations and tradeoffs of gains and losses and advantages and disadvantages, Apple will make an iPhone with a larger display, and will do so quickly enough so that a larger displays won’t confer any competitive advantage to Android or other smartphones. 

After all, everyone at Apple, especially the executives in its c-suite, which includes Jony Ive, use the latest production iPhones as their personal smartphone, and the execs and design team also comparatively use not only Android phones with larger displays but prototype iPhones with larger displays that Jony Ive designed for his team, other Apple execs, and until lately Steve Jobs to use and compare with the iPhone’s instant 3.5 inch screen.  And the conclusion has been that the iPhone’s 3.5 inch display is optimal given all of the other tradeoffs and design considerations.

Tomorrow is another day with new design considerations that may prove that a larger display provides a better user’s experience.  If that day dawns, Apple will put a larger display on its iPhone, but the size of that display will be determined by the need to provide the best user’s experience, not by dumb product differentiation or comments from the peanut gallery.

imonaboat

Ignoring your ignorance and arrogance (not to mention your own stupidity) most reports are that Androids have a much higher failure rate that iPhones. Between my kids, my wife and I we have had about half a-dozen Android devices and most of them have had significant issues right out of the box, or developed them over a short period of time. I don?t know of anyone who has an iPhone that has experienced the sort of trouble we have had with Android products.

And no, we are not stupid. I?ve been involved with computers (PC?s) for over 20 years. I started using them when they were still called IBM-compatibles (a term with which you may not be familiar, if you are the typical Android fan) running DOS (another term with which you may not be familiar, if you are the typical Android fan).

As for Android dominating smart phone sales?.You want to redo your math. There are?what?probably close to 4-dozen Android smart phone products currently available. How much market share does each one of them have separately? Now, compare that to iPhone sales. The iPhone (which it could be argued is a single phone, albeit available with three different memory configurations) holds nearly 20% of the market. And the best Android can do?with all it?s phones from all it?s makers?is only 50% of the market? You call that dominating?? I call it pathetic.

Actually, reading your comment only supports my argument even more, but without knowing exactly what you were doing to your device, nor knowing which device you had, nor knowing ANY other details about it, I guess I’m obligated to give this one to you. And fyi, my iPhone 3G was insanely slow ever since I left 3.3.1. My problem? Not in the slightest. If Apple knew how slow the 3G would get after the updates, then they should have just left them out. It’s not that difficult to see that one.

You know, I could start talking here and say I develop apps for BB, Android, and iOS, but we’re all on the internet, who’s going to believe me?

We’re talking about Android vs. Apple. Android. Apple. Look at the title. I’m certainly not referring to one Android product in general. Like I said, this article (and what I said in my above post) is Android is dominating Apple. Quick Google search here: http://www.dailytech.com/Android+Market+Share+Reaches+56+Percent+RIMs+Microsofts+Cut+in+Half/article22852.htm

Give me a more recent market share and show me where Apple is fronting Android and I’ll call you an honest man.

imonaboat

Ah, the toys?the little gewgaws. This desire for toys is a clear indication of the age appeal of the phone, and its users. I understand the post now (as if the arrogant, simplistic tone didn?t already give a clear indication of the level of maturity).

I?m curious, though, what, exactly, is the market share of the Inspire 4G. I wonder how it compares to the 16GB version of the iPhone 4S? This would be an interesting comparison, and one more telling.

-Jon

P.S. And again, I have nothing personal against the Inspire or other Android phones. It?s the attitude behind those who have to justify their purchase by denigrating the iPhone, and ignoring some simple truths (which John has kindly pointed out in this article)

I ALMOST ignored your post due to your own ignorance.

I was comparing ANDROID to APPLE. Get the facts straight Mr. Jumpy. And LOL without me even posting which Android device I have, you would have never even known. I’ve dealt with and fixed hundreds of iPhones and iPod Touches screens, digitizers, and a couple other things. I’ve only ever had to fix Android software before and the occasional battery.

Here’s proof where Android is dominating the market share:
http://www.dailytech.com/Android+Market+Share+Reaches+56+Percent+RIMs+Microsofts+Cut+in+Half/article22852.htm

imonaboat

What I find amusing is how this also has been an argument among many Windows-users when they want to put Mac-users in place. The funny thing about it, is that they first accuse Mac-users of being arrogant and condescent and the next thing you know is that they accuse people who have problems with Windows - and now Android, obviously - for being too stupid to handle it, assuming that one would need a certain level of technical knowledge to use it.

Now, we are talking about consumer products here and not products aimed at and meant for professionals. I would say that if a consumer product requires a high level of technical insight to be used properly, it has failed.

I cannot say whether Android-phones have failed, since I never have used one, but I am quite happy with the fact that my iPhone doesn?t require any geekery on my behalf to work:D That?s what I expect from a phone. And no, I do not feel any desperate need to tweek it and fiddle with it, no more than I feel such an urge regarding my car. I want it to start when I turn the ignition and to function safely and take me where I want to go.

If the way it does so, is in a smooth and well-functioning fashion I am happy and content. Simple as that.

If Android-owners feel that way, that is good. That is how I feel as an iPhone-owner:)

You succeeded in telling me you were too lazy to figure out a more feature-rich product? It’s the problem people have with going from one OS to another. They constantly focus on how much harder its going to be rather than at least trying it out. Besides, in ICS most functions are more simplified anyways. No reason now for people like you to not try out the product. My Android gets the job done. My iPhone didn’t even come close.

wilf53

My Android gets the job done. My iPhone didn?t even come close.

Well, then you should be as content as I am, shouldn’t you? smile My iPhone gets the job done. Maybe an Android is more feature-rich but I am not missing anything in my blissful ignorance:)

As for market share, that is an old song, already sung by many. Let us see it this way, if one producer which manufactures one phone has that much of a market share, compared to Android which is installed on a myriad of phones, manufactured by many companies, I wouldn’t say it is that bad for that one company:)

I guess they laugh all the way to the bank while the others count their market share:D

Market share or market cap, that seems to be the question…

JonGl

I was comparing ANDROID to APPLE. Get the facts straight Mr. Jumpy.

OH!!! I am so sorry! I didn’t realize how ignorant and jumpy I was being, by presuming that you didn’t want to compare a whole ecosystem of several manufacturers and dozens and dozens of models of phones to one manufacturer and one (at the most three) model of phone! I am so ignorant and stupid to not realize that you _wanted_ to do this! I hang my head in shame, and humbly bow out of this conversation recognizing your superior attitude, er intellect…

-Jon

imonaboat

OH!!! I am so sorry! I didn?t realize how ignorant and jumpy I was being, by presuming that you didn?t want to compare a whole ecosystem of several manufacturers and dozens and dozens of models of phones to one manufacturer and one (at the most three) model of phone! I am so ignorant and stupid to not realize that you _wanted_ to do this! I hang my head in shame, and humbly bow out of this conversation recognizing your superior attitude, er intellect?

-Jon

So sarcasm is your way of upholding your side of this argument? Like I said before, this entire ARTICLE is comparing Android (the OS) to Apple (the OS). It’s a cheap way for the editor/writer to get easy views because he focuses on Apple alone.

I am not biased. I may have sounded horribly biased in my recent posts, but it’s not the case. iOs does a shockingly good job with simplifying their OS and UI so practically anybody can pick it up and use it. The most current iOS devices are ALL extremely snappy and nice to use/hold in the hands. By saying Android is only playing catch-up though to Apple is a huge lie and everybody knows it. About the ONLY thing I see currently that differentiates them is Siri (which is a very neat tool even though it is only in its Beta).

mrmwebmax

+

Let?s see here, any reason why Android is DOMINATING iPhone in sales? Let me spell that out for you D-O-M-I-N-A-T-I-N-G. OBVIOUSLY Android is doing something correctly if they have such a large market share. Nobody gives two sh**s about the new iOS, because its all OLD news to us Android users. Every bit of it has been in use by an Android for a great deal of time. The ONLY reason why there are so many iPhone users is due to people jumping on the bandwagon and wanting to be like the rest of everyone else and their little brother. Most people are too stupid to even use an Android phone which is reason enough for them not to purchase one.

The logic simply astounds the mind:

“The ONLY reason why there are so many iPhone users is due to people jumping on the bandwagon and wanting to be like the rest of everyone else and their little brother.”

So, let’s see: There are “so many iPhone users” because they “want to be like the rest of everyone else”? That means “everyone” is an iPhone user? But didn’t you begin your tantrum by asserting:

“Let?s see here, any reason why Android is DOMINATING iPhone in sales? Let me spell that out for you D-O-M-I-N-A-T-I-N-G.”

And then, you also say:

“Most people are too stupid to even use an Android phone which is reason enough for them not to purchase one.”

So, by your own argument:

a) Most people are too stupid to use an Android phone, which is why most people don’t purchase them.

b) There are so many iPhone users because they want to be like everyone else…meaning everyone else is also an iPhone user.

c) Android is DOMINATING iPhone in sales.

First off, nothing says cool, rational argument like the liberal use of the CAPS LOCK KEY. Second, you spend so much time contradicting yourself, it’s obvious you don’t so much have a clue as a desire to come into an Apple-centric website and be a typical Android troll. Might I suggest a new site for you to frequent?

SAN JOSE, CA?With funding from dozens of news outlets and media companies, the groundbreaking Outkube.com launched this week, providing an online destination where pandering and incendiary content is used to lure moronic Internet commenters away from all other websites.

The site has so far proved extremely popular with the worst **** human beings imaginable.

According to sources, Outkube boasts thousands of articles and forums carefully crafted to draw in dim-witted web users and effectively quarantine obtuse, uninformed comments on topics such as gay rights, Ryan Gosling, the threat of Sharia law in the U.S., health care reform, whether Kobe is better than LeBron, Jewish control of the government and media, the New York Jets, the Second Amendment, and professional wrestler John Cena. [MRM note: Android vs. iOS should almost certainly be next.]

Most stories on the site are reportedly preloaded with several witless and profanity-laden comments specially designed to incite retaliatory remarks.

“Outkube provides an immensely valuable public service,” said YouTube CEO Salar Kamangar, one of the decoy website’s founders and principal investors. “With its unparalleled expanse of sensational content and lack of filters or character limits on postings, Outkube attracts the broadest possible spectrum of jabbering halfwits?from paranoid reactionaries to know-it-all **** to racists to plain old ****.”

“Now you can read an article or enjoy multimedia on your favorite websites without having to endure the revolting, barely coherent comments these troglodytes used to leave at the bottom of every page,” Kamangar continued. “At long last, a new era has dawned for the Internet.”

Officials at Outkube explained the site relies on a set of fine-tuned algorithms to produce and continuously refresh its content. Using up-to-the-minute sports scores, trending search terms, TV viewing statistics, and key phrases from the latest scaremongering political e-mail forwards [MRM note: smartphone handset releases and OS updates are surely next], the formulas churn out the divisive social commentary and mindless celebrity gossip upon which web-surfing morons thrive.

In addition, sources confirmed that each day Outkube’s software produces dozens of new pop-culture rankings, such as “The 10 Most Underrated Bands” or “The 15 Best Sci-Fi Movies Of All Time” [MRM note: bet this is a favorite one with the Android crowd], which have been shown to occupy some of the Internet’s most obnoxious commenters indefinitely, freeing the remainder of the web for actual rational discourse….

Read all about it here. And feel free to visit it. Often.

imonaboat

The logic simply astounds the mind:

Well then, you should have been able to separate iPhone *users* and iPhone *sales*. Either way, I don’t need to argue back on this. I’m pretty sure the Android market share already does that for me. 56% is a very large number vs 28% for iOS. You people sound so scared to accept where Android is going. And the funny thing is, nobody expected it to happen like this.

mrmwebmax

+

Well then, you should have been able to separate iPhone *users* and iPhone *sales*.

So let me get this straight: You’re suggesting that there are more iPhone users than there are of iPhone sales? Meaning what? That for every iPhone sold there are multiple users for it, kind of like a smartphone carpool?

Perhaps its the other way around: For every single Android user, there are many Android phones sold? Now that would explain Android market share as well, because—by your exceedingly flawless logic—no one uses Android because it’s too hard to use, and everyone uses iPhone because they want to be like everyone else, yet Android has the most market share.

Hmnn…this does make sense. Each iPhone iteration is a solid upgrade from the previous model, spaced apart by a year or more. As an iPhione user, each time I buy a new iPhone I know I’ve got the latest-and-greatest iOS phone for at least a year.

But look at you poor Android users!

If I’m a Droid Bionic owner, I have to be pretty peeved.
The Bionic was supposed to be positioned as Verizon Wireless’ flagship 4G LTE smartphone—the first with a dual-core processor—when it launched in early September. But its reign barely lasted a month, and following several recent announcements, it may not even rank as the third-best Android phone in Verizon’s lineup by November.
The speed in which new Android devices are hitting the market speaks to the strength of Google’s mobile platform. But it also leads to a lot of headaches for consumers who can be overwhelmed by the sheer number of options emerging every day. It’s like the Best Buy commercial parodying the next great device coming out moments after you buy it, only it’s playing out in real life.

No wonder there are so few Android users (because it’s too hard to use and everyone wants to be like everyone else and everyone else uses an iPhone—your words, not mine), yet so many Android sales! Why, you’ve got to upgrade every month or so! Yikes, that gets pricey, doesn’t it? But it does explain why there are so many iPhone users, so few Android users, so many Android sales, and why you Android users feel the overwhelming need to come into Apple-centric websites and claim your smartphone platform’s vast superiority. No doubt because you’ve spent so much money on new phones every month or so

You poor guys. I feel for you.

imonaboat

You poor guys. I feel for you.

Lol you are so salty over this great iPhone/Android debate. I’ve said what I need to say and I’m not taking back anything I said. I only chimed in on this article due to the vast number of biased reviews: from people who have *only* used iOS. This has seriously been so enjoyable to me hearing everybody’s opinions—immensely flawed at that.

The Grownup in the Room

Grow up kid, your ‘Droid toy is just that.

Nemo

There has been a lot of talk here about smartphone dominance and market share, so I think that I will bring some facts to the discussion.

Apple’s iPhone has earned 67% of all profits for the entire cell phone industry.  That is not just for smartphones but for the entire cell phone industry.

Apple’s share of the smartphone market is just shy of 20% at about 19%.

Apple earns 28% of revenues for the entire cell phone industry, not just smartphones.

Source:  http://www.asymco.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Screen-Shot-2011-08-11-at-8-11-10.14.00-PM.png

There isn’t an individual maker of Android phones that comes any where near Apple in terms of revenue.  The profits of the entire collection of Android makers combined sum to just about a little less than half of Apple’s profits for its iPhone. 

And now that the carriers are offering a pretty good smartphone, the iPhone 3GS, free on contract and the iPhone 4 for a mere $99.00, the days of the Android makers racking up market share with free and cheap Android phones are over.  So with the iPhone 3GS and iPhone 4 attacking the previous unchallenged low end and the iPhone 4S sweeping all before it on the high end, in addition to dominating revenues and profits, Apple’s already good market share numbers will begin to rise.  How high shall they go?

Lee Dronick

Thank you Nemo.

Garion

The iPhone 4 is a good ereader, but with a 5-inch screen it would be a great ereader.

There’s an iPad for that. Much better e-reader than any 5” device.

Rhonin

Sometimes your phone choice has little to do with the OS.
Current phone: Samsung Galaxy S2
My requirements:
- 4G
- 4”+ screen
That left me with Android and Win7.
Due to the hardware limitations on iOS, I skipped them, no matter good the OS might be.

Nemo

Dear Rhonin:  Jony Ive and Tim Cook accept that there is a small subset of folks for whom, notwithstanding the facts of the its iPhone/iPad hardware/and iOS/iTunes Stores platform—for they are indeed a unified platform—that have eccentric requirements such as yours that take them outside of the user’s experience envelope that Apple can satisfy.  I myself, because of Apple’s censorship of its App Store, am on the on the extreme limit of Apple’s iPhone/iPad hardware/and iOS/iTunes Stores platform.  Those, such as you, who are beyond the limit of Apple’s iPhone/iPad hardware/and iOS/iTunes Stores platform must take their custom elsewhere, to places such as the Android or Windows Phone OSs.  Enjoy your choice and goodluck.  If Apple censorship of the its App Store moves any further outsided the bounds of censoring civil and decent content, I may be forced to join you or forced to abandon smart platforms—because of personally unacceptable Android, Windows, and Amazon privacy policies—altogether.

Nemo.

skipaq

Nemo: I don’t have a problem with Apple’s censorship. The only question that would concern me would be the censorship of something I absolutely needed. Censorship is practiced openly or discreetly by just about everyone and every organization including public and government. I grew up near Boston when the term “Banned in Boston” was still a reality.

Certainly, if something is censored from any app store that you must have; then it would make sense to go elsewhere.

Nemo

John:  Do forgive this departure off topic.  And I shall not renew the earlier debates over Apple’s censorship.  I think that we exhausted that topic.  But I will say this and no more:

Dear shipaq:  Against the city of Boston or the State of Massachusetts, I can go to the courts to remedy their censorship of speech based on the content of that speech.  Indeed, the First Amendment requires government’s acceptance of speech that I don’t think Apple should have to accept.  But where speech meets standards of civility and decency prevailing in Western democracies and a forum becomes an important public sphere, as has Apple’s App Store, what I need is access to all civil and decent discourse so that I can hear and decide matters for myself. 

As much as I admire and respect Tim Cook, I am not ready for him to have his sole discretion over what apps, which are engaged in civil and decent discourse, may communicate to me and others, because I falter myself that I and the majority of my fellow citizens are sufficient in character and intelligence and, having attained our majority, have the right to hear decent and civil content in the public sphere for ourselves, and respond to what we hear as we see fit within the bounds of morality and law.

skipaq

Nemo: When it comes to things like censorship I am a pragmatist. I didn’t make an argument for or against it. Your answer was not needed nor does it really deal with what I said which is that I would only look elsewhere if something I really needed was censored. It is just an observable fact that censorship is everywhere in our society. That is not a moral or legal statement.

By the way, I don’t put confidence in Tim Cook for what I hear, read or use any more than I did Steve Jobs. I think there are already signs that things will be looser under Cook. Your confidence in the courts is something I don’t share. How many legal challenges over how many years were made against the official censor in Boston? Some remedies don’t come during your lifetime and others never come through the courts.

Majority thinking or character is no guarantor of ultimate morality, law or good unless there is an underlying moral goodness of that majority. I know that this strays from the technology issues; but your original statement wasn’t about technology. You have a right to your opinion; even as I felt it needful to respectfully oppose it.

Rhonin

A thing on Apple, or rather iOS censorship, if you place an iPad2, an Android tablet (I used a Transformer) and a pc on ie side by side, you will find there Re a number of entries that do not show on the iPad.
Whether this is due to intended censorship or the lack of functionality like flash, you don’t get the whole Internet in a iDevice.

Lee Dronick

A thing on Apple, or rather iOS censorship, if you place an iPad2, an Android tablet (I used a Transformer) and a pc on ie side by side, you will find there Re a number of entries that do not show on the iPad.
Whether this is due to intended censorship or the lack of functionality like flash, you don?t get the whole Internet in a iDevice.

I see it the other way. Flash websites don’t get the whole internet viewership. Their loss not mine.

Rhonin

I see it the other way. Flash websites don?t get the whole internet viewership. Their loss not mine.

When I have to resort to an app to see missing pieces of the Internet, something tells me that the design is wrong.  If an app even exists.
For those who don’t know and assume it is not there, I call that designed censorship.
On the other side, if I am required to use an app to see, that censors me from other options that may negatively affect my opinion.
Either way, I want all of it.

Lee Dronick

When I have to resort to an app to see missing pieces of the Internet, something tells me that the design is wrong.? If an app even exists.

Yes, it sucks that we have to use apps such as browsers and plugins to see Flash.

Gareth Harris

Somehow this reminds of days of yore, over a half century ago, when I strutted around high school with my slide rule / sword hanging off my belt. I was hot shit. Mine was the biggest. BUT sic transit gloria mundi.

[PS: Actually I still have that Pickett slide rule - and manual, but not the belt holster]

Lee Dronick

Actually I still have that Pickett slide rule - and manual, but not the belt holster

I have quite a few that were my father’s, including a large one still in the leather holster.

skipaq

I still have mine in it’s green leather holster wink

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