Bono on Jobs: He’s Generous, but Private

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The New York Times recently called out former Apple CEO Steve Jobs for what was possibly a lack of philanthropy. U2 leader Bono, however, disagreed and let the paper know what he thought of its assessment.

Bono from U2Bono says Steve Jobs is generous, but private
Image courtesy Steve Kalinsky

In his letter to the NYT, Bono stated:

As a founder of (Product)RED, I’d like to point out that Apple’s contribution to our fight against AIDS in Africa has been invaluable. Through the sale of (RED) products, Apple has been (RED)’s largest contributor to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria — giving tens of millions of dollars that have transformed the lives of more than two million Africans through H.I.V. testing, treatment and counseling. This is serious and significant. And Apple’s involvement has encouraged other companies to step up.

The NYT noted that Mr. Jobs isn’t a member of Giving Pledge, a charity started by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett, and that there aren’t any public records of charitable donations in his name. The article also notes that Mr. Jobs may well be making anonymous donations, and mentioned that a recent US$150 million donation to the cancer center at the University of California might have come from Apple’s former leader.

“I’m proud to know him; he’s a poetic fellow, an artist and a businessman. Just because he’s been extremely busy, that doesn’t mean that he and his wife, Laurene, have not been thinking about these things,” Bono added. “You don’t have to be a friend of his to know what a private person he is or that he doesn’t do things by halves.”

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20 Comments Leave Your Own

geoduck

I have felt that charity isn’t charity when it’s done for a tax deduction or so people will say nice things about you. For this reason I donate anonymously and don’t claim it on my taxes. Sounds like SJ is of like mind.

Lee Dronick

The other thing is that if you give publicly to one charity they may sell your name and contact info to other charities who may overload you with requests. If you have a reputation for being a miserly then you can quietly do charitable work.

The last time that I ordered checks I had them not print my phone number.

geoduck

The last time that I ordered checks I had them not print my phone number.

Years ago when I worked in retail I saw a fair number of checks with name, address, phone, and drivers licence/SSN on them.
<shudder>

mactoid

Years ago when I worked in retail I saw a fair number of checks with name, address, phone, and drivers licence/SSN on them.

I’m old enough to remember when people used to have their phone number AND their drivers license numbers pre-printed on checks!!!

<<double shudder>>

Lee Dronick

Still on the check tangent.  These days I rarely use them for retail purchases. Mostly I use them for magazine subscriptions, school fund drives, political donations, and charities. In the shops I mostly use cash or the ATM card. Yeah there was time when merchants wanted a phone number on the check so that they could call “if there was the problem.”

dhp

Still on the check tangent.? These days I rarely use them for retail purchases.

The last time I wrote a check it had been a year since the previous one. However, checks may be coming back if banks start charging for debit card use as Wells Fargo and others I testing in some markets. It’s ridiculous; surely it’s cheaper to process a card transaction than a printed check.

estern53

The only odd thing about this is that Apple sold a product to donate the money. they did not reach into their bank account to give it to BONO. Apple will give to charity as long as they don’t lose money. its still kind of sad state affairs when extremely large corporations sit on tons of money while people continue to lose jobs and the poverty level increases.

mhikl

It’s a foreign concept to western culture but giving in the East is a spontaneous offering and no thank you is given in return and not expected. Such would interfere with karma.

In the West, charity is to be made public by most and hailed out as generosity.*

Many North American native cultures follow the gifting of the East, but compared to western charity, their’s may take up most of their fortune, be that what it may.

In the West we measure the gift by its absolute value in monetary measure. In the East, the virtue is of the heart.

* Such was not always the case and is still not the accepted practice in some western cultures.

dbarnard1

I have felt that charity isn?t charity when it?s done for a tax deduction or so people will say nice things about you. For this reason I donate anonymously and don?t claim it on my taxes. Sounds like SJ is of like mind.

A noble sentiment, but just because you get a tax deduction for it doesn’t mean it’s not giving. It just allows your gift to go farther. Let’s say you were being taxed at 30% and you have $1,000 that you can keep or donate. If you keep it, you keep $700 and $300 goes to Uncle Sam as income tax. If you donate it, you’re giving away $700 but allowing the charity to receive an extra $300 that would otherwise go to Uncle Sam. speaking for myself, I’d prefer to be the one deciding how those dollars get spent, not Congress.

In that sense, by not claiming it as a tax deduction you’re shortchanging the charity and sending the message that you think the government knows how to spend your money better than you do.

mhikl

Would not expecting tax write offs be a sort of charity offering to your own country?

Taxes pay for schools, roads and in most western nations, healthcare. Different countries view taxes differently. Probably with good reason.

I am in geoduck’s camp. The tax write off thing seems wrong. Partly it’s the karma thing, and I see and admire the results of taxation in the quality of my city, the roads through the foothills and mountains, our school system and great health care equal to all. I do question that corporations get far too large tax breaks, but can’t expect perfection.

Panhandlers, the Salvation army at Xmas time and kids’ sports are my charities of interest.

Neil Anderson

What are checks? smile

JDSoCal

Screw the lefty NY Times. Who says billionaires have to give all their money away when they die? They pay enough taxes during life. Apple’s done more for job creation, tax payments, and private wealth creation than any charity ever did.

Lee Dronick

Screw the lefty NY Times. Who says billionaires have to give all their money away when they die? They pay enough taxes during life. Apple?s done more for job creation, tax payments, and private wealth creation than any charity ever did.

Charities don’t do those things, they Mathew 25:36

Oh and dead people don’t pay taxes, their heirs may pay taxes on what is inherited.

mhikl

Mathew 25:36

“Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me.”

The Bible on the Poor or, Why God is a liberal (Bible talk: http://www.zompist.com/meetthepoor.html)

The Bible contains more than 300 verses on the poor, social justice, and God’s deep concern for both. This page contains a wide sample of them, and some reflections. It’s aimed at anyone who takes the Bible seriously.

I have heard that such examples are not used much in some Christian places of worship. Though not being of a faith based religion, I’m sure there is some good reason.

And this one is Buddhist in nature:

Mt. 5:42. Give to him who asks of you, and do not turn away from him who wants to borrow from you.

JDSoCal

?Naked, and ye clothed me: I was sick, and ye visited me: I was in prison, and ye came unto me.?

Not sure what’s up with all the God stuff, but the typical tithe in the Bible is 10%. I doubt God anticipated that Americans would pay upwards of 50% of their incomes (fed and state and FICA and sales and property) to the government, largely for income redistribution to the “poor.”

And conservatives tend to give more than liberals of both their time and money to charity.

http://www.amazon.com/Who-Really-Cares-Compassionate-Conservatism/dp/0465008232

JDSoCal

Oh and dead people don?t pay taxes, their heirs may pay taxes on what is inherited.

Spoken like a true liberal thief.

Lee Dronick

I am not a Liberal, I am a Progressive much like Teddy Rooselvelt. Also I am not a thief, calling me that was slanderous.

mhikl

Spoken like a true liberal thief.

Not nice. Not the way of the right, right?

You sound like an intelligent sort, JDSC. Check this out.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-14764357
Your nation is in terrible shape. Maybe this will offer some reason as to why.

I hope you would not be in favour of unleashing the beast and taking the ride.

dhp

And conservatives tend to give more than liberals of both their time and money to charity.

...while supporting policies that make sure the poor stay poor and the rich get richer. Progressives work for structural changes in order to lessen the divide between rich and poor in the first place.

mhikl

Progressives

Progressives I am slow of mind at times, dhp. I just got it.

So Liberal is sullied. Get a new name. Progressive. I like it! It’s sort of been done before, though, and for a similar reason.

In my country, the name The Conservative Party of Canada wasn’t doing so well against the Liberal Party so they joined with another party called The Progressive Party of Canada and became, The Progressive Conservative Party of Canada. That party is now defunct and is back to being The Conservative Party of Canada run by some Republican-like wannabes.

Never thought positively about progressive since the name Liberal is not derided up north and progressive was associated with conservative. But I like the name now.

How long before it is derided enough to lose favour, eh? But in the mean time, progressive fits the bill.

What’s in a name? A lot it seems. A rose may not lose its sweetness, but its name could be sullied if the powers that be chose it to be so. We’ll see.

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