CNET Dubs iPhone the Worst Phone in the World

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It's OK to call Apple's iPhone the best phone ever, but not in the CNET UK offices. Instead, they dubbed the iPhone the worst phone ever, but also said it's the best mobile Web device and media player.

The complaints the CNET UK crew have with the iPhone all relate to the device's phone features. Poor call audio quality, dropped calls, failure to ring for incoming calls, heat issues, and battery life all make the complaint list.

These are the same issues that have cropped up ever since the first iPhone hit the streets in 2007, and while some can be addressed with software updates, others require changes to Apple's design. Apple can't, for example, offer a user replaceable battery without significantly changing the iPhone's design.

Despite the complaints, the iPhone is still seen as best in class for mobile Web surfing, and no one has been able to match the iPhone's touch interface, or the success of the App Store. It's also in the pockets of half of CNET UK's editorial team.

"If the iPhone is inaudible, unconnected, on fire and out of battery, why is the thing so popular?" CNET's Flora Graham asks. "The fact is, although the iPhone is the worst phone in the world, it's the best handheld computer there is."

Comments

Jeff Gamet

People have been complaining about the iPhone’s features even before it was released. Despite its shortcomings, the iPhone is still leaps and bounds beyond its competitors. Still, it would be nice to have longer battery life…

D9

I agree. Articles like CNET’s seem to be meaningless head-banging against an absolute wall of truth…the iPhone is a huge success despite some’s perceived deficiencies.

Josh

sounds like CNet’s UK page is short on ad revenue and has decided to click-bait Apple/iPhone fan’s. 

1. Make outragious claim that is demonstrably not true
2. Watch people run to your site so that they can crow about how assinine your claims are
3. Profit off of Google Ad words

Wait a little while, then rinse and repeat.

I have an iPhone and it may not be the best “Phone” (why you would want to treat the separate features of a single, integrated device individually if not to create an artificial situation for critisizm is beyond me), but it is far better than several of the “Feature Phones” I’ve used in the past.  How about my old motorola in which the replacable battery kept becoming disconnected from the leads, unexpectedly shutting my phone off?  I’d take fully enclosed battery over one that randomly turns my phone off any day.  Besides what percentage of the cell phone using market actually replaces the battery on their phone ever?

Lee Dronick

CNET seems to like outrageous headlines, it brings numerous page views and partisan comments.

geoduck

Millions (and increasing) of happy iPhone owners would disagree.

John Elberling

i call BS on the endless whining about “no swapable/replaceable battery.”

with many good and varied versions of external powerpacks available there is simply no reason to need an “extra” battery. if you have to carry something extra what is the difference?

and no one should want to open up their phone at all anyway. stuff can get inside - dirt, dust, moisture, sand ... and things can get broken.

the original iPhones are now over two years old and so far there is no wave of end of life batteries. if the they make if four years, that too is a non issue.

i think geeks get some kind of fetish thrill from opening up their hardware, and so the iPhone frustrates them! but everyone else wants it to just work.

Lee Dronick

with many good and varied versions of external powerpacks available there is simply no reason to need an ?extra? battery. if you have to carry something extra what is the difference?

Considering the bombing raid Droid commercial they should do something with soldiers wearing crossed bandoleers full of user replaceable batteries “charging” across no man’s land.

Nostradamus

Why do people not get it? Non-user-replaceable batteries are batteries that are kept out of the waste stream. User-replaceable batteries are very often tossed in the trash, where they become toxic time-bombs. I do not see why personal convenience trumps ecological common sense, but then who am I to suggest that people act responsibly?

daemon

Why do people not get it? Non-user-replaceable batteries are batteries that are kept out of the waste stream. User-replaceable batteries are very often tossed in the trash, where they become toxic time-bombs. I do not see why personal convenience trumps ecological common sense, but then who am I to suggest that people act responsibly?

Ecological common sense? Yes, let’s ignore the reusability of user-replaceable batteries and the thousands of recycling programs and just assume that they’ll all be tossed into a landfill.

jragosta

““If the iPhone is inaudible, unconnected, on fire and out of battery, why is the thing so popular?”” CNET’s Flora Graham asks.

Answer:
Because Flora Graham doesn’t know what she’s talking about and CNET doesn’t know enough to hire decent editors.

Inaudible - wrong. Certainly not the best phone on the market, but definitely not the worse. And absolutely not ‘inaudible’.

Unconnected - huh? The iPhone is widely recognized as the most widely connected phone in the world. iPhone users use the Internet vastly more than other phone users.

On fire - Truly delusional. Sure, there may be a couple that caught fire (although at least some of the reported cases clearly involved damaged phones). But given the millions of units sold (or is it tens of millions?) the number is extremely small.

Out of battery - Nonsense. My iPhone battery has NEVER gone dead. Sure, I usually charge it every night whether it needs it or not, but I’ve never failed to get through a day (or more) with adequate power. If you need more, it’s easier and safer to carry an external backup battery than an internal replacement, anyway.

I really wish that these ‘news’ sites would stick to facts instead of inane editorializing.

wilf53

I have been using mobile phones since 1996 and of various brands. The last one I had before I finally bought the iPhone 3GS, was a Nokia N82. I also use hearing aids so I think I am one who really needs good audio quality in a mobile phone and that has really been a problem.
Not with the iPhone. It is without any doubt the best phone I have ever owned or used when it comes to audio.
There might be better mobile phones out there, but I haven?t had the chance to use them or own them. The Nokias, the Ericssons, Sony Ericssons, Alcatel (some cheap French), Siemens and Samsung phones I have had, were all poorer than the iPhone. The Siemens wasn?t too bad, though.
It is a pleasure for me to use the iPhone as a phone and that hasn?t happened to me before. I trust my own experience much more than some trolling CNET-editor in the UK.
And dropped calls? The only times I have experienced dropped calls on any mobile phone is when someone has entered a tunnel or been out in the wilderness.

ericmurphy

Virtually all of these complaints are actually complaints about the quality of AT&T’s network. Arguably, battery life is one of the complaints which can be laid at AT&T’s feet. If I am in an area with decent cellphone reception, I can easily get through the day having used much less than half the battery charge. If I’m in an area with crap cellphone service, I can exhaust the battery in less than twelve hours without even making any phone calls.

bousozoku

Virtually all of these complaints are actually complaints about the quality of AT&T?s network. Arguably, battery life is one of the complaints which can be laid at AT&T?s feet. If I am in an area with decent cellphone reception, I can easily get through the day having used much less than half the battery charge. If I?m in an area with crap cellphone service, I can exhaust the battery in less than twelve hours without even making any phone calls.

Yet, people in England are not likely on AT&T’s network.

iPhone seems to be fine in non-phone circumstances, but just isn’t a good phone for the price, regardless of other capabilities.  It’s fine to say that it’s on the internet more than any other phone, but when you call, what do you get?

yrrab

I suggest if the CNET UK office knows sooo much more than everyone else.

Why don’t they build their own phone that out performs the Iphone….Oh! I know—-

Because they CAN’T—-All they can do is bitch & whine like the little girls they are!!!—-They should just stick to saving the world from global warming hahahahahah—or Some other Myth that is as ridiculous—-

Jason

Why do people not get it? Non-user-replaceable batteries are batteries that are kept out of the waste stream. User-replaceable batteries are very often tossed in the trash, where they become toxic time-bombs. I do not see why personal convenience trumps ecological common sense, but then who am I to suggest that people act responsibly?

Nonsensical.  Batteries fail regardless of who gets to replace them.  To think that each and every single user will toss the battery into the trash and that each and every store that replaces a battery will recycle them and thus minimize toxic time bombs is absurd.

Dreadnought

“Poor call audio quality, dropped calls, failure to ring for incoming calls, heat issues, and battery life all make the complaint list.”

I feel like it’s 2007 all over again. 

1 - Poor call audio quality - this is the first I’ve heard of this problem.  I have never had a problem with the audio, and none of the dozens of iPhone users I know have this problem

2 - Failure to ring for incoming calls?  What?  Maybe Ms. Graham has turned the mute switch on. 

3 - Heat - That is a real issue, but it’s not one that no other smartphone hasn’t experienced.  Apple promptly addressed the high heat problem some of the 3G phones started to experience with the 3.0 firmware update.

4 - Battery life - The iPhone, with all of its bells and whistles gets better battery life than any other phone I’ve ever owned (going back to the original Motorola brick circa 1996).  A big differentiator that no one ever metions is how mindlessly easy it is to charge.  Got a USB port and an iPod cable, and you can charge right off of your computer.  During a 22+ hour trip I recently took, I forgot to bring the right adapter for the seat power (Air France doesn’t use the standard plug), but recharging the phone was no problem.  I changed the settings on my netbook to stay awake when the lid was down (so it would still power the USB port), and my iPhone was like a little vampire, sucking power off of the netbook’s battery.

Do any of the Android phones come with USB power cords?

Ernesto

iPhone is most def going down little by little.  Android is going to be taking over the world of mobile phones.  I do agree that the iPhone is one of the best phones to have, but I do think that it is not the BEST.  I have a G1 and have plenty of friends who have iPhones, different gens at that, and give Android enough time and iPhone will not be at the top. The restrictions they put on their customers is too much, even iPhone devs have switched over to Android Market. With only a couple of months and 1 phone they took over 20 percent of the market and now they have wut like 8 to 10 models running android at least and a bunch of other ones and A LOT of companies jumping onboard…...I dont know wut that means to y’all but those are facts and iPhone with some time WILL start decreasing fan base.

Adam

Fuck the iphone it sucks buy windows mobile or android

Steven

Do any of the Android phones come with USB power cords?

My G1 came with one bro. Also had copy and paste since day one.

Nice try

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