Flash Player Missing from New MacBook Air

| News

Apple may have included flash in the form of RAM storage on the new MacBook Air, but the company chose to skip Flash Player for Safari. While Apple isn’t exactly enamored with Adobe’s media playback platform, it hasn’t gone so far as to stop new MacBook Air buyers from installing Flash Player themselves.

There’s no word on why Apple chose to leave Flash Player out of the new laptop’s factory software installation, which will no doubt lead to speculation that the company is beginning to distance itself even more from the current Internet media playback standard.

The new MacBook Air: Flash-free. Sort of.

Flash isn’t supported on Apple’s iOS devices which include the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Instead, Apple is pushing HTML5 and CSS3 for online multimedia content.

The new MacBook Air was introduced on Wednesday during a special media event on the Apple campus. The revamped laptop weighs in under three pounds, dumps an internal hard drive in favor of flash RAM, and offers instant on and up to 30 days of standby time between battery recharges.

Adobe hasn’t commented on Apple’s choice to not include Flash Player with the default OS installation on the MacBook Air.

[Thanks to Engadget for the heads up.]

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Comments

Lee Dronick

Possibly so Apple doesn’t ship MacBook Airs with outdated Flash players. Just speculating.

FlipFriddle

Has it ever come on any system? Apple doesn’t typically include 3rd party software. I seem to remember always having to install it, but maybe I’m mistaken.

Lee Dronick

Has it ever come on any system? Apple doesn?t typically include 3rd party software. I seem to remember always having to install it, but maybe I?m mistaken.

Good question and having had bought two new MacBook Pros this year I don’t remember having had to install Flash or not. However, I would have to look at the dirty plates in the sink to remember what I had for breakfast this morning.

vasic

Ever since Safari came out (2003), it came bundled with Flash. This is the first time it doesn’t.

Now, if Apple also made changes to Safari so that it displays blank box where Flash should be, rather than the ‘missing plug-in’ Lego brick icon, the mission to make MBA behave like an iPad would be complete, and the users would (correctly) believe that something is wrong with the web site they’re visiting. And they would (likely) move on elsewhere. No eyeballs (or click-trhougs) for Flash-infested content!

So now, the only way for developers of Flash content to circumvent the limitation is by wrapping their Flash stuff into an app for iOS, or as self-contained application for the Mac. Hopefully, many will do that, leaving browser with clean, fast and efficient (not to mention power-conserving) content.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Well, the first thing any Mac user should do is install Chrome. The latest Flash is always included. And with Chrome to Phone, it works great with your Android phone.

palenoue

Personally I’m glad they don’t include Flash.  There are a number of web pages I visit every day that stall, hang, misbehave and crash due to flash ads.  Unfortunately there are two web sites that require flash to see the content I want.  I wish there was a way I could easily turn off flash entirely, then option it to be on for just those few pages that need it.

Lee Dronick

I wish there was a way I could easily turn off flash entirely, then option it to be on for just those few pages that need it.

There is, sort of, Click To Flash. It keeps the Flash file from loading and puts a placeholder image in its place. If you want to see that Flash content then just click on the placeholder image. Click To Flash is also available as a Safari extension

Lee Dronick

And with Chrome to Phone, it works great with your Android phone.

Great wordplay there Bosco smile

Ethan

Actually the first thing a dev does is use this:

http://www.gskinner.com/blog/archives/2010/04/return_of_the_b.html

to bring back the blue lego so the user knows that they don’t have a plugin installed that the site requires. Then the user can decide for themselves what to do and Big brother can just accept their choice. Very simple.

Ethan

“Hopefully, many will do that, leaving browser with clean, fast and efficient (not to mention power-conserving) content.”

http://www.themaninblue.com/writing/perspective/2010/03/22/

In reality canvas/svg animation is about the same as flash player performance. Same for video decoding IF you have a mac that Apple blessed Flash player to access the gpu directly (recent nvidia macs basically). A lot of the video decoding issues for the flash player has been lack of direct gpu access-so they had to do everything in software.

So the idea that no flash means “clean, fast and efficient” and having flash means dirty, slow, and inefficient is silly. There are samples of badly written canvas code that will take your cpu to it’s knees.

graxspoo

Oct 20 2010: The day that the user’s ability to install whatever they want on their Mac was put on notice.

Apple is bent on turning the Mac into a big iPhone with a keyboard. Pretty soon you will be barred from installing anything except through the App Store.

zeh

Really? I always had to install flash on my newly macs…weird..

MacKeeper_fan_Mod

I think flash needs to go bye-bye
Why would anyone need to rely on one particular company to view web contents?

Why would web site companies and/or developers risk some viewers not able to view their site because it is limited to ONE COMPANY, adobe. Wouldn’t it make perfect sense to make it work with an OPEN standard?

Look at Youtube, it works just fine, everywhere, always!

ethan

“Look at Youtube, it works just fine, everywhere, always!”

All content on the web does not fall into text or video. In my field we need to deploy training that runs the gamut from screen to screen. And we need to not waste hours on multi-platform, multi-browser tweaks so we can keep costs competitive. SVG support is not there in corporate browsers, canvas performance is average and 3d specs are really young. The tooling to use those specs in an efficient way are a joke compared to the tools in place for flash: adobe’s, flash develop, FDT are light years ahead for multimedia development. So for us the open standards DO NOT meet our needs or our client’s.

The web is a big place and one tool or tech does not meet all needs for all types of content.

You talk about youtube html5 player working everywhere. So html5 capable browsers are everywhere now? Huh. News to one of my clients who just upgraded to IE7 last month.

Lee Dronick

See this story on Computerworld. Apple has told them that Flash will not come preinstalled on all new Macs, nut just the MacBook Air

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