Google Adds Push Notification for Gmail to iPhone

| News

Google announced Tuesday the addition of Push notification for Gmail users on their iPhones, iPod touches, or Windows mobile devices through Google Sync. That means that users will no longer have to check for new messages on these devices, but rather that Google's servers will push them out directly, if the user so chooses.

"Using Google Sync," the company said in a blog post, "you can now get your Gmail messages pushed directly to your phone. Having an over-the-air, always-on connection means that your inbox is up to date, no matter where you are or what you're doing. Sync works with your phone's native e-mail application so there's no additional software needed."

Google also said that new configuration options will allow users to choose whether or not to sync Contacts, Calendar, or Gmail, or any combination of the three.

You can find more information on Google Sync at Google's Web site.

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Comments

Dave Hamilton

To add some details here: the iPhone still doesn’t support Push Notification for IMAP mail servers. The way Google works around this is by effectively acting as an Exchange Server clone. You setup Google as you would an Exchange server, and then push functions the same as it would if you were connected to a corporate server. A few caveats:

1) The iPhone will only connect to one Exchange server. This means if you’ve got multiple Gmail accounts, only one will work as push on the phone (the rest need to be normal IMAP). Also, if you’re already connected to your corporate Exchange server, you can’t add a Gmail push account.

2) Push for Exchange servers only works over Wi-Fi if the screen is on. Otherwise, you need to be connected to an EDGE or 3G network (mostly this affects iPod touch users). Reason being: WiFi does not stay connected when the device is (for lack of a better term) asleep.

-Dave

Tiger

Dave,

Thanks for the head’s up. All sound like they are means by which to conserve already precarious battery life.

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