Google Cannot Successfully Compete with Apple

| Analysis

Is Google Apple’s competitor? It certainly seems like it when we read about Android’s smartphone market share. Or the new Chromebooks from Google. In reality, Google isn’t competing with Apple at all, and, in fact, never can.

As we all know so very well, Apple is a company that excels in the user experience. Advanced technology is made usable via superb software — the user interface. Because of that linkage between the hardware and software, Apple builds hardware that we want to own. Covet might not be an exaggeration.

Google doesn’t sell hardware, and they don’t sell the user experience. The goal of Google is to make money by giving away free services, like search, that make money on the back end with ads. In essence, we are drawn to Google because their products are free, but we’re left with that lingering, nagging feeling that we’ve given up something valuable, our privacy, location, our likes and dislikes, for free services.

Even though Google’s business model has made them billons, it’s not a business philosophy that’s designed to earn our love, loyalty and respect.

Understanding Human Nature

It’s very hard right now, in many places, to just walk into an Apple retail store and buy an iPad. The adequate supply of components is not yet within Apple’s grasp. But lots of people know one thing: they want an iPad, and nothing else will do.

Compare that to Google’s dubious roll out of the Chromebook - a PC-like notebook that is a solution in search of a problem. The Chromebook doesn’t have local storage. You can’t install your own apps. It’s an Internet appliance designed to force you to live in the cloud, living only in a browser. Period. As Mike Elgan points out very clearly, it isn’t a very desirable device, we give up a lot of control, it doesn’t meet the needs of home users, and there’s no guarantee that Google will support it once they lose interest. It’s just a silly experiment born of too much cash and undisciplined thinking

The CustomerIf we need further proof that Apple is building products that people like rather than technologies that try to seduce us, Horace Dediu has published an analysis that shows the following: in Q1, Apple’s iPhone had five percent of the mobile phone volumes, 20 percent of the revenues and 55 percent of the profits.

People buy iPhones to have that particular product from Apple and its fabulous, fairly secure ecosphere. People buy Android phones for many other reasons, but it’s not related to affection for the hardware or the OS. And as we know, Google has had a hard time working with the carriers to roll out the latest updates — sometimes with security issues that are fairly serious.

Google’s entire business model is sustained by a desire to use advertising to drive revenues behind free services that then allows them to dabble in advanced software technologies that they can then roll out for free, maintaining the cycle. Android may have have a lot of customers, apps, and smartphone market share (spread across many hardware makers), but Apple remains firmly in the business of earning the customer’s money by making hardware we love. That’s a long term, sustainable business.

Apple earns its loyalty and earns its profits in a very special, customer oriented way. Steve Jobs understands people. The dizzying array of software technologies that Google keeps throwing at us (and at the wall to see what sticks) isn’t going to change that and, ultimately, cannot compete for the hearts of customers.

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Comments

hangtown

I would agree with all that, except that I know several Android owners who genuinely do have affection for their phone hardware and software. I’d argue they’ll never know what they are missing, but it doesn’t change the fact that they are happy with what they have.

mhikl

John, you sure sing on tune. No twang in your guitar. Now, must finish article.

Lee Dronick

“Apple is a company that excels in the user experience.”

Shouldn’t that be “Apple is a company that Numbers in the user experience.”

would agree with all that, except that I know several Android owners who genuinely do have affection for their phone hardware and software

Sure, people are attracted to and appreciate things based in large part on their psychological makeup. Of course ofttimes we have to use tools or dress in a fashion as part of our jobs.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

In essence, we are drawn to Google because their products are free, but we?re left with that lingering, nagging feeling that we?ve given up something valuable, our privacy, location, our likes and dislikes, for free services.

In my case, I wanted a phone that worked how I worked. I discovered a phone that could read text messages through my Bluetooth headset and do very useful things entirely hands-free. Almost a year ago.

Oh, and it cost me $600 to get a Nexus One and leave my iPhone with 18 months left on contract in the drawer. Hardly free. Worth ever cent.

Another “free” Google product I spend money on is Google Books. I actually read more books in the past three months than in the preceding two years. I can read in the browser on my MBP, in the browser on one of my Win7 netbooks, read right on my N1 phone—ideal for the couch. And it remembers where I left off. Additionally, I can carry books with me that I use as reference. I keep Guy Kawasaki’s Enchantment on my phone because it has some very useful “checklists” and my name in the “beta testers” acknowledgement. Best of all, Google Books doesn’t try to lock me in to Google devices. I appreciate that freedom and Google’s willingness to meet me on my terms.

sflocal

Just about every Android owner I know got their phone because it was “cheap”.  They totally hate their phone and the complexity and instabilities it has.  Just about all of them will be switching to the iPhone when the opportunity arises.

Now, the ones that absolutely love their Android phones overlap in two categories.  Apple haters, and the techo-geek, nerd types that think they know better what’s best for everyone else.  The same folks that worry their job-security is at stake for being the go-to guy to come to when their friends can’t figure out their own phone.

mhikl

John says: People buy Android phones for many other reasons, but it?s not related to affection for the hardware or the OS.  . . ., Google has had a hard time working with the carriers to roll out the latest updates ? sometimes with SECURITY ISSUES . . .

Google reminds me of the Dollar Store. These kinds of stores used to be fun to visit for they provided inexpensive but fairly well made products and the loss of a dollar didn?t amount to much. Now the stuff has become so cheaply made it are practically useless. For a tad more, far better can be bought elsewhere. Those kinds of stores served a purpose and challenged the pricing structure of other enterprises but now retailers have challenged those pricing structures and quality.

Google may be well nigh its prime and its desperate shift from ?open? may spell doom to its fortunes in the land of tablets. Reliability is more important in tablet complexity than in mobile phones, I suspect.

I wonder if most of those who ?love? their Droid phones aren?t actually thinking, futuristically, of their next Droidenstein.

There is hope in any world when one learns to read. Kudos. I suggest ?Never Ending Story?. A little repetitive, but not too taxing.

You nailed it, sflocal.

A thoughtful mini, mid-week Particle Debris, John. Apple shouldn?t find it terribly difficult to play hardball with someone who?s mind is distracted on other schemes and not on the game itself. The point on Human Nature is poignant. Jobs does truly seem to relish the human experience. Google and so many other tech industrialists remind me of a nursing friend who once said, ?It?s a really great job, except for all those sick people.?

Google may be kin to a real estate agent. It doesn?t make the product and its interest wanes once you sign on the dotted line. (My best friend is a realtor and he agrees.)

daemon

Tell me, of these power tools, which one has the best interface?

Now, how do I find that on Apple.com?

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Tell me, of these power tools, which one has the best interface?

In my expert opinion, that would be the Sonya Kraus one. Germany makes more than cars. Who’da thunk?

Lancashire-Witch

n my expert opinion, that would be the Sonya Kraus one.

Strange. I chose “On-line Fitness Coaching from Girlwithnoname”

Her user interface looked well tested; but will she still be there the next time I search for power tools. Who knows?

zewazir

I think the biggest point is that Apple’s first and foremost product is hardware. For all the iTunes store and App store, OS X and iOS, in the end they all add up to one purpose: perks designed to sell Apple branded hardware.

OTOH, Google is in the service business. They sell (give away at the price of selling their client’s souls to ad agencies) services. Services - whether sold or given away - is a completely different market than is hardware. Droid is constantly being compared to iOS, and in that people tend to view it as competition with Apple.  But in reality, Droid is one of Google’s direct products, while iOS is a FEATURE of Apple’s iPhone - not a stand-alone product as Droid is.

In short, trying to compare Google to Apple goes beyond comparing apples to oranges (pun unavoidable), but more like trying to compare apples to bratwurst. You can eat both apples and bratwurst, but there the similarity ends. Apple and Google both have to do with telecommunications and information technology, but that is about the only similarity they share as companies.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Strange. I chose ?On-line Fitness Coaching from Girlwithnoname?

Fragmentation is your friend.

Lee Dronick

Bosco (Brad Hutchings) said:n my expert opinion, that would be the Sonya Kraus one.
Strange. I chose ?On-line Fitness Coaching from Girlwithnoname?

Her user interface looked well tested; but will she still be there the next time I search for power tools. Who knows?

Both of those interfaces are a little too thin for my tastes. Perhaps the one for the pipe threader. It too is thin, but softer. The interface for Kai’s Power Tools is interesting, if not a bit like being on LSD.

I think the biggest point is that Apple?s first and foremost product is hardware. For all the iTunes store and App store, OS X and iOS, in the end they all add up to one purpose: perks designed to sell Apple branded hardware

A lot of truth in that.

Nemo

John, I think that you are right with a caveat.  Free, that is, not charging monetary consideration, is very seductive.  To beat it, Apple must continue to produce top-quality products and services that provide such a superior user’s experience that we are willing to pay at least a fair price for them.  That is much tougher than what Google has to do by offering its stuff without charging money, but Apple has heretofore been up to the challenge. 

The caveat is this, while there is some overlap in the iOS and Android platforms customers, Apple’ iOS and Google’s Android seduce different customers, who are charmed by different things.  Apple iOS customers place a premium on its superior user experience, both in their iOS device and its ecosystem, while Android customers are more charmed by not having to pay money and by the specious freedom that Android promises, though that freedom is proving to be an illusion, as carriers, OEMs, and Google assert greater and greater control over Android.  While iOS customers will have greater loyalty to their devices, a loyalty which will most likely be enhanced by experience with Android, Android customers are likely to stick with Android, unless and until they try and iOS device. 

So I think that Android can compete, but it competes for a different type of customer, a type of customer who will remain loyal at least until that customer comes to see the value in Apple’s iOS products, either because of a positive experience with an iOS device or because of a disappointing experience with Android.  It is Apple’s job to win as many Android users as possible by making certain that as many Android users as possible get to experience the full benefits of its iOS devices.

archimedes

Apple earns its loyalty and earns its profits in a very special, customer oriented way. Steve Jobs understands people. The dizzying array of software technologies that Google keeps throwing at us (and at the wall to see what sticks) isn?t going to change that and, ultimately, cannot compete for the hearts of customers.

Microsoft never competed for the hearts of customers - people generally don’t love Windows or their Windows PCs. Microsoft competed for the *wallets* of customers - by making inexpensive and widely available, if mediocre, technology which did most of the stuff that Apple did, just not as well. That strategy was incredibly successful.

Android is a much better imitation of iOS than Windows was of Mac OS. As a result, Google *is* competing for the hearts as well as the wallets of customers, not to mention developers.

Because the iPhone has only been available on AT&T (and now Verizon) in the U.S., the market was left wide open for Android devices. Even if Apple adds Sprint and T-Mobile (not to mention MetroPCS and Boost and Cricket and Virgin and ...)  the iPhone is going to continue to face serious competition from Android devices which are widely available in the carriers’ ubiquitous shops as well as Best Buy, etc..

Apple’s in a much better retail position with the iPad, but Google is still doing its darnedest to compete, for example giving out Samsung Galaxy 10.1 tablets to Google I/O attendees. Quite literally, Google put an Android tablet in the hands of every developer at the conference. Google is absolutely trying to get Android developers to develop apps for Android tablets as well as phones.

It’s also not just Google which is competing on the Android side; Apple partner Samsung is taking some of its best technology and building it into Android devices; Amazon, a company which people do love, has its own Android app store which is part of amazon.com, and is probably going to roll out its own Android-enabled Kindle at some point.

You can bet that Steve Jobs absolutely knows that Google (note to mention Samsung, Amazon, etc.) and Android are competing with Apple and iOS.

Garion

“Google cannot compete succesfully with Apple”.
Really?
Some might say they already do.

pav

Oh!...that was fun…just come across this article and reading all those “google evil will take your soul vs iGod device”...and couldn’t stop wondering until I did not scroll up and noticed name of this website :D….phew…for second I thought world became bonkers

Ross Edwards

?Apple is a company that excels in the user experience.?

Shouldn?t that be ?Apple is a company that Numbers in the user experience.?

I love you, man.

Lee Dronick

Thanks Ross, I am glad that you got it.

mhikl

Nemo says: To beat it, Apple must continue to produce top-quality products and services that provide such a superior user?s experience that we are willing to pay at least a fair price for them.

I think Apple competes with itself more than anything else. However, how you phrased it adds nuance from another angle that makes a lot of sense.

Garion, I thought Apple competed with Google too but reading on the TMO, John’s efforts especially and some of his links have shown me otherwise. I’m not even sure Google completes with anyone other than doing what it can to enhance shucking dollars from adverts and links.

Now bragging rights to be the big guy in the shower, that works into the formula somewhat. Boys will be boys and with Ballmer head of M$, Google’s job seems much easier. With Jobs, I suspect there’s a lot of envy smitten with respect.

Terrin

You are undoubtedly correct. I don’t get it though. Most Android phones have very poor build quality. The Nexus One and G2, both by HTC, are made out of cheap plastics. They feel cheap in your hand.

Motorola’s phones also suffer the same problem. Moreover, Motorola doesn’t know how to design power connectors. Out of the three Motorola phones in my household over the years, all three died before the contract date ended. It usually is because the power adapter cracks the cheaply made case.

Say what you will about Apple’s OS, but the iPhone is seems to be way better made then many if not most of the Android phones out there.

I would agree with all that, except that I know several Android owners who genuinely do have affection for their phone hardware and software. I?d argue they?ll never know what they are missing, but it doesn?t change the fact that they are happy with what they have.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

You are undoubtedly correct. I don?t get it though. Most Android phones have very poor build quality. The Nexus One and G2, both by HTC, are made out of cheap plastics. They feel cheap in your hand.

You have obviously never held a Nexus One in your hand. You can read a review here that discusses the construction and feel. Here’s a pull quote:

The Google Nexus one feels like a solid phone. Unlike the iPhone 3G and 3GS, the surface in the back doesn?t feel slippery. Instead, it?s very soft, warm and not prone at all to fingerprints. I question the brown-ish color choice (lesson not learned from the G1?), which I personally don?t like, but you?ll decide for yourself. Other than that, the design is very nice and quite minimalist, and I bet that most people will find it pleasing to look at and to hold.

In my experience, it has a much better feel than the iPhone 3GS. I have my aluminum band across the back engraved with “Brad Hutchings. Dog walker and plumber.” It’s a very classy looking and feeling phone.

akcarver

?Apple is a company that excels in the user experience.?

Shouldn?t that be ?Apple is a company that Numbers in the user experience.?

It’s nice to know we can count on you for some great comedy, Flashman.

Peter

in Q1, Apple?s iPhone had five percent of the mobile phone volumes, 20 percent of the revenues and 55 percent of the profits.

I always dislike this sort of argument.

The first problem—at least where Google is involved—is that Google makes $0 selling Android.  Where Google makes it’s money is through advertising, where eyeballs matter.  So having a bunch of inexpensive phones is actually good for Google.  Yet we don’t see that sort of comparison—how much money is Google making from those ads that show up in Google (and others’) Apps versus how much money Apple makes selling the phones?

The second problem, as a consumer, is I don’t see what difference how much money Apple makes off of my purchase influences my purchasing decision in any way.  So Apple made more money than anyone else selling cellphones.  Does this make me want to buy an Apple iPhone more than an Android phone?  Or does this help cement the belief that Apple gear is “too expensive”?

Don’t get me wrong—whenever someone trots out the old “Apple is doomed” meme, these numbers are worthwhile.  While Apple may never get better than 10% of the cellphone market (cellphone not smartphone), they’ve shown that they can have a pretty good business with those kinds of numbers.

RonMacGuy

You have obviously never held a Nexus One in your hand.

I’m confused.  Is this the phone that someone recently referred to as “Google?s short lived Nexus One Android device” or is it what I would (to coin a borrowed phrase) call the “declining and mostly irrelevant Nexus One”?

grin

This is when BNB starts to ignore me again…

Dave

Yet another Apple circle-jerk - do Apple fan-people never tire of congratulating themselves on buying something that is good but expensive? Big deal guys - now get over yourselves. As any fool knows, Apple have a consistently loyal user-base, but it never quite takes over, as a software platform that works on an inexpensive diversity of hardware is ultimately much more compelling in the marketplace. Please explain to everyone the success of MS Windows over Apple’s software (just for the sake of ritual humiliation), and then work out for yourselves why Android will be not just in phones but all kinds of devices by this time next year. Whereas iOS will not. Period.

Duggo

Ummm? Apple’s revenue from the iPhone alone is larger than Google’s entire business. In fact, it’s almost twice as large.

Sort of ends a lot of these silly arguments.

RonMacGuy

So Dave, let’s address some of your concerns:

“Something good but expensive” - List price on iPhone is same as most comparable android phones, except they have to basically give discounts on android phones in order to compete with each other.  iPad is as cost competitive as just about any other “competitor” (not that there are any real competitors out there yet, but that’s another story).

“Apple have a consistently loyal user-base” - I would say, a consistently growing user-base.  You can’t argue the continued quarter-by-quarter record sales/volume growth that has been going on for several years.  This is not the Apple of old - More and more people are moving to Apple.  Even today, 1 in every 4 smartphones sold is Apple.  A flat user base cannot sustain that kind of sales.

“the success of MS Windows over Apple?s software” - Well, let’s see, Apple is bigger now in market capitalization, sales revenue, and profit.  I guess it all depends on how you define “success”.

“why Android will be not just in phones but all kinds of devices by this time next year” - Huh?  Other than phones and tablets, what else are you referring to?  I guess we can just make stuff up to support our claims.

The “this time next year” reference reminds me of BNB - I wonder if he uses “Dave” as an alias…  Probably not, as BNB can at least write without all the bad grammar…

Dave

RonMacGuy - Dave is my name. Nicely anonymous I admit but still, it is my name smile

Before continuing, I must make the point: Apple make excellent software and hardware. The point I’m making here is how Android will win out, despite this fact.

Android devices (like PCs and laptops before them) will drive each other’s prices down through competition - as has already happened. Apple ‘superiority’ pretty much always guarantees they do not quite enter the fray. They’d lose too much snob value.

It’s true that Apple’s user-base has grown. I was making the point that Apple’s user-base is loyal, not like the fickle people who go out and buy PCs, Android phones, even (heaven forbid!) ordinary cell phones, economical cars etc (i.e. the rest/majority of us). Let’s take the example of Mac laptops. Thoroughly excellent products, they are three times the price of something that would suffice for many people. So people who buy Acers do not suddenly flock to buy Macbooks.

MS may be on the wane now, true. But for two decades Windows based PCs and laptops have completely dwarfed Mac hardware sales. Show me the large corporation which makes their entire workforce use Macs. So indeed, it does depend on how we define “success”. You could argue that, given the obvious superiority of Apple’s products, they have historically and spectacularly failed to break MS’s dominance.

As to more devices than phones or tablets (is your world really that small?) I admit to blatant speculation, but based in the real, happening world.

I suggest you try Googling “Android in cars”, “Android in TVs”, “Android and Arduino”. Maybe you can think of more?

It’s an open platform, where Apple’s is closed.

A word: before engaging in pedantry, check your facts. Don’t make blind assumptions, least of all about the person you are addressing. I may not be a grammar-maven (thought that would be obvious!), but does anyone have a problem understanding me? Who is BNB? I’m only here because this page irritatingly turned up in a Google search on the problems with unencrypted tokens used by some apps on older versions of Android.

mhikl

Dave, you like facts. Here are some facts.

1. Check out Apple stock vs Google stock over the past 6 months, year, and from Google’s beginnings. Apple wins.?

2. Check out iPhone profits vs Android manufacturers? profits. Apple sells fewer phones but takes the majority (i.e. more than 50%) of all smart phone profits. Android makers are barely scraping by and have to survive on volume.?

3. Check out computer sales over the past number of years (five or more). Apple has been in growth mode and others are in decline. Apple used to have 2% computer sales in the US; now it is 10%. Apple now sells 5% of computers world wide. The gap has been slowly narrowing for some time now.?

4. Check out profits on computers sold. Apple sells 90ish% of all computers at the high end of the computer market. That is where the profits (as in huge) are made. Apple takes a lot of loot to the bank while “others” are barely getting by. Acer, for example, is in terrible decline and trouble. CEO got the boot for this reason, if I remember correctly.?

5. Check out tablet sales. Apple has not lost percentage sales over its year (and counting) producing the iPad series. Apple’s iPad sells 98+% of all tablets purchased (those just sitting idle in stores in disarray are not in the count). The tablets of the competitors are unfinished products and hurried to market. Not a wise stratagem.

6. Check out tablet profits. Apple makes 40ish% off each tablet its sells. Walmart et all make $15ish from each iPad they sell relying on third party add ons to make any real change. From Moto, Samsung etc Walmart et all get their hefty 40ish% cut from the retail sale of products which is money out of Moto, Samsung et cetera’s pockets. Sadly, this makes it very difficult for the tablet makers to garner suitable profits to assist with development.

When it comes to success, dollars seem to be the traditional metre stick of measure. While Apple is now making the dollars meeting the traditional measure, quality is the trump card that keeps Apple’s faithful fans interested. It also brings in new clients. There is a lot less interest in specs anymore. What works and how well it works in this busy world of ours counts for a lot of Apple’s success. Good enough is good for fewer and fewer as these statistics seem to suggest.

Regarding the Open and Close debate, it seems Google is now going for what it calls, Choice. Apple goes for ease of usability so maybe Choice and Ease of Use are the two sides of the coin and each has value for differing needs.

Dave, assumptions have made about your and others’ grammar or spelling which seems unnecessary for we all can make errors in our hurry. It’s a huge world and we are better served learning from the widest gathering of sentient beings, regardless their writing styles. For some, English may not be their first language. For others, the opportunities of a good education may not have been afforded them. For others, editing skills are not as acute. I am a terrible speller and usually have my computer speak back my words which helps with some word problems that I and spelling checkers might miss. I have later cringed when later re-reading some of my sentences. Keep posting as you have made some valid points.

Regarding blind assumptions: reminders to be aware and be mindful are always good to note.

RonMacGuy

Dave, I will apologize for the grammar comment.  But, I get a bit worked up with comments like “Apple circle-jerk” and your other “Apple fan-people” generalizations and other implied insults in your post.  You really came flying in as a typical anti-Apple troll here and frankly I wasn’t expecting you to stick around that long, to be honest.  But I am sorry for my insult.  I enjoy a good debate and look forward to other peoples’ views here, but can we cut the crap about circle jerks and Apple fans congratulating themselves and getting over ourselves?  I am an Apple fan, but not blindly.  I also use Windows a lot both at work and home, as a lot of Apple fans do.  Just please cut the troll-like garbage that you spewed out first.  Thanks.

I am still working, but will take a look at yours and mhikl’s posts tonight.  Take care.

RonMacGuy

Dave, one quick response to your “open vs. closed” argument.

First of all, your open argument for android will definitely hurt in the enterprise arena - reference the MacObserver writeup from May 13th entitled “Microsoft Exchange Host: iPhone/iPad Crushing Android in Enterprise”

Also, here are a few android “current events” that I found recently and posted in a different MacO article a few days ago.

Latest news on android:  android 2.3 has been released for 5 months now but has only been installed on 4% of android devices.  If android is so “open” why can’t 96% of android devices actually get the latest version of their OS after 5 months after release?  Seems kind of closed to me…  And, not much of a “Choice” as mhikl referenced.

And from appolicious.com: ?Yesterday, the functionality to rent movies on Honeycomb tablets and desktop computers was introduced with a promise to bring the mobile devices running 2.2+ up to speed within the next couple weeks. This has been available through iTunes for so long that I don?t even consider it a feature.?

And, although available for months on iPhones/iPads, Netflix is now FINALLY available for android! But wait, it is available on just 5 handsets (the Samsung Nexus S, and the HTC Incredible, Nexus One, Evo 4G and G2) and Netflix is ?feverishly working on adding more devices to that list, but as of now the rest of the android nation ? including tablet users ? will just have to wait.? (quote from yahoo news).

So Dave, you talk so proudly of what android is going to do in the car (OMG, that is almost as scary as Microsoft running your car!! LOL) or on your TV (have you heard of Apple TV? - I think iOS beat android there…) or whatever the hell ‘Arduino’ is, all by “this time next year”, I ask you - how many “not so open” versions of android will still be in use this time next year, and what small fraction of them will actually work in your car/TV/arduino?  Meanwhile, look at penetration of the “closed” iPad into enterprise, hospitals, musicians, government (Obama), television (news anchors, actors, etc.), artists, schools and universities, small doctors offices, and on and on and on.  I tell you, NOTHING android does “this time next year” will touch what iPad has done “in the past year” - see the difference?

OK, not so quick of a response, but no one ventured into my office at work, so I just kept going!!  grin  Bring on the lively discussion!!

paikinho

Bosco
Oh, and it cost me $600 to get a Nexus One and leave my iPhone with 18 months left on contract in the drawer. Hardly free. Worth ever cent.
————-
Hey could I have your iPhone. I will stick it on my bike and use it as my cycle computer.  Mine old specialized cycle computer from ‘92 broke last week.

Zrotpar

Just about every Android owner I know got their phone because it was ?cheap?.  They totally hate their phone and the complexity and instabilities it has.  Just about all of them will be switching to the iPhone when the opportunity arises.

You appear not to know all that many Android owners.  My phone was not “cheap” (unless $200 is what you call “cheap”), and every Android phone owner I know is quite happy with their phone.  My phone is also quite simple and stable; I’ve experienced only 3 easily-reset crashes in over a year!  I frequently suggest apps and features to newbies who love discovering the previously unknown abilities of androids, like being able to dictate text messages, for example.  Or having text2speech read them to you over a bluetooth earpiece.  It’s an absolutely wonderful device.

I also take every opportunity I can to good-naturedly tease the iPhone owners I work with, and they’ve since come to respect the fact that my phone can do anything theirs can, as well as some things theirs cannot.  It’s been months since a fanboy bragged about his iPhone to me.

I freely admit that the iPhone is a cool gadget - one of the best.  The same can be said for the iPad and the iPods.  I don’t own any of the above for two reasons; Apple retains far too much control over the devices they “sell” for me to be comfortable, and they simply refuse to work and play well with others.

No flash video, no native mp3 capability, no FM in the iPods, all inputs have to run through itunes, etc.  Why the restrictions?  “Because we’re APPLE, and we say so!”

Sorry, that’s not good enough for me, and with the variety of devices out there now that are just as good if not better, I don’t have to be envious of Apple capabilities any more.  My device is better.

Zrotpar

Apple earns its loyalty and earns its profits in a very special, customer oriented way. Steve Jobs understands people.

Yep.  And those he doesn’t understand, he tracks using an unencrypted file on their iPhones that keeps a record of everywhere they’ve been in the last year…without telling them, of course.

Come on people, be honest here.  Did you feel betrayed by that revelation?  Perhaps you should pull off the “Apple” blinders for a bit…

akcarver

No flash video, no native mp3 capability, no FM in the iPods, all inputs have to run through itunes, etc.? Why the restrictions?? ?Because we?re APPLE, and we say so!?

Why would I want FM in my iPod? I have MY music with me, why would I want to listen to someone else?s choices? And as for mp3 capability, you’re full of crap. Every iPod EVER can play mp3s.

Zrotpar

Why would I want FM in my iPod? I have MY music with me, why would I want to listen to someone else?s choices? And as for mp3 capability, you?re full of crap. Every iPod EVER can play mp3s.

“Why would I want FM in my iPod”?!  Are you seriously asking that question? Have you been drinking THAT much of the Apple Kool-aid?  Your music - where you learn about YOUR music from, or do you now only listen to music that came out BEFORE you got your iPod?

I said “no native mp3 capability”, which is a fact.  IPods only play mp3s AFTER they have been run through iTunes - there’s that control issue again.  How could you not know that?!  After the recent revelation that Apple tracks your iPhone location even with GPS disabled and stores that information for months, only the MOST gullible individuals would believe that iTunes doesn’t do the same thing with files you put on your iPod.  You cannot simply sideload an mp3 into an iPod and have it play; something nearly ANY other mp3 player can do.

Perhaps you don’t mind, but I don’t want Apple monitoring my music/photo/video preferences via iTunes - and I’ll take my mp3 players WITH FM playing capability, thank you very much.  When I hear something new I like, I can go buy it.  It seems like you’ve already heard and collected ALL the music you’ll ever hear.

Zrotpar

I?m confused.  Is this the phone that someone recently referred to as ?Google?s short lived Nexus One Android device? or is it what I would (to coin a borrowed phrase) call the ?declining and mostly irrelevant Nexus One??

I’m not sure who said that, but it’s obvious they didn’t know what they were talking about.

The Nexus One was the best piece of hardware extant when it went on sale, and it’s still one of the best.  All it lacks when compared to the MOST recent phones available is a forward facing camera and 4G - the latter of which has yet to appear on any Apple product over a year after Sprint released the EVO.  BEFORE the iPhone 4 (not 4G) too.

The Nexus also still does a host of useful things that no Apple product to date can do - nor is there “an app for that”.  That Google couldn’t market it properly won’t change any of that. 

Google will learn from that experience, and it will do just fine competing with iOS.

akcarver

akcarver said:Why would I want FM in my iPod? I have MY music with me, why would I want to listen to someone else?s choices? And as for mp3 capability, you?re full of crap. Every iPod EVER can play mp3s.
?Why would I want FM in my iPod??!? Are you seriously asking that question? Have you been drinking THAT much of the Apple Kool-aid?? Your music - where you learn about YOUR music from, or do you now only listen to music that came out BEFORE you got your iPod?

I find new music through my work as a merchandiser for a major reseller of music, and by watching shows where bands perform, like Jay Leno, David Letterman, and so on. Or I can get referrals from friends, who?ve told me about a lot of great music I wouldn?t have heard of otherwise, because the band isn’t high on a particular label?s priority list for promotion. And there’s a lot of crap on the radio I DON?T want to listen to, like almost all rap, anything from Lady Gag Gag, Christine Aguilera, The Lonely Island, and so much more. I?m more of a classic rock kind of guy, but I like newer bands like Mumford & Sons, Adele, The Tragically Hip, Iron & Wine, Feist, and so on. I also listen to the radio, but I don’t need that functionality on my iPod. I already have a radio in my car, and next to my bed, and through my cable tv service. I have enough radios, I don’t need another radio.

BTW, there?s NO evidence whatsoever that Apple collected that tracking data in any purposeful way. Just because the data is on your iPod or kept in a backup file on your computer, that doesn’t mean it was ever sent to Apple.

akcarver
akcarver

BTW, there is at least one iPod, the nano, that has FM. There have been others in the past, and there will be others in the future. It’s just not something I want in my iPod. I’m glad Apple offers a variety of models so I don’t have to pay for a feature I don’t want or need.

And I don’t care that I have to use iTunes to load my music. It’s a convenient feature having everything in one place. If you don’t like it, you don’t have to buy an iPod.

RonMacGuy

The Nexus One was the best piece of hardware extant when it went on sale, and it?s still one of the best.?

I love how the techies stand by their junk even when the rest of the known population had no interest in it.  Funny.

From “Wired” Jan 2010 - “About 20,000 Nexus Ones were sold in the first week, compared to 250,000 for the Motorola Droid and 1.6 million for Apple?s iPhone 3G S, estimates Flurry, an analytics company that tracks the usage of developer applications on iPhone and Android platform.  The shockingly low number, if true, means the Motorola Droid outsold the Nexus One more than 12 times and the iPhone 3G S had 80 times the sales of the Nexus One in its first week.”

RonMacGuy

After the recent revelation that Apple tracks your iPhone location even with GPS disabled and stores that information for months, only the MOST gullible individuals would believe that iTunes doesn?t do the same thing with files you put on your iPod.

Give me a break.  Are you actually “gullible” enough to think that Google doesn’t do the same thing?  The music you listen to, the places you’ve been to, the websites you’ve visited, the advertisements you’ve read (yes, they can track how long you’ve looked at an ad before closing it).  Big question is, why would Apple care?  I can see Google actually doing something with their data given their huge reliance on advertising to make money.  Steve Jobs and Apple don’t really care what Zrotpar does.  Zrotpar hates Apple with a passion and doesn’t buy Apple products.  Apple focuses on product design and usability.  When they do well, more of their products sell.  Pretty good cost model.  For Google, the more crap advertising they get you to look at and do something with, the more money they make.  Pretty low-life business model if you ask me.  Kind of like the lawyers following ambulances to hand their business cards to injured people.  Google should try innovating instead of copying and finding ways to take money from people to justify their existence and instead of developing smart phone OSes for the express purpose of finding ways to get advertising in front of your noses at all points in time!!

Intruder

IPods only play mp3s AFTER they have been run through iTunes - there?s that control issue again.

Nice rectal extraction there.

I have loaded MP3s onto iPods without “running them through iTunes.”
iTunes does absolutely NOTHING to the MP3. It is merely a tool for loading the iPod. There are other tools that can mount an iPod and you can add music with them and they will play just fine.

Stop making things up.

joze

Are you actually ?gullible? enough to think that Google doesn?t do the same thing?

No. But Google is nice enough to put a big box on the screen that ask if they can collect info from me. To which I respond yes or no.

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