Greenpeace Praises Apple for Doing “The Right Thing” in Leaving Chamber

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Greenpeace released a statement this week praising Apple for doing "the right thing" in leaving the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in protest of that group's opposition to proposed regulations and legislation intended to address greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental issues. The environmental group then called on Apple's technology peers to follow suit.

"Apple has stormed out of the biggest lobby group in the United States," Greenpeace said in a statement. "At issue is the US Chamber of Commerce's use of funds to oppose climate change legislation. Apple has done the right thing, and IBM and Microsoft should think different [sic] too."

The group added, "Now is the time for IBM and Microsoft to speak out against the position of the Chamber -- or do what Apple did, and leave."

Greenpeace hasn't always been Apple's biggest fans in the environmental movement. In December of 2006, the group protested outside Apple's Fifth Ave Cube Apple Store in New York City, charging that Apple wasn't properly handling e-waste. In January of 2007, the group again protested, this time outside of Macworld Conference & Expo.

While some accused Greenpeace of unfairly targeting Apple in order to leverage the Mac and iPod maker's (this was prior to and when the iPhone was introduced) popularity in order to bring more attention to their cause.

Whether or not that was true, and whether or not the protests had an effect on the corporation, Apple has since taken a more aggressive stance in its own environmental policies, eliminating toxic PVC and BFR chemicals from its MacBook and iPod lines, and touting the greenness of its product lines.

More recently, as noted above, the company quit the U.S. Chamber of Commerce in protest of the group's environmental approach, an aggressive move that seems to have won the favor of Greenpeace, whether or not that's what Apple was seeking.

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Comments

Bryan Chaffin

Clearly the “think different” line references Apple’s old “Think Different” campaign, but its usage here was sloppy. Not sure why it annoys me, but the bad grammar would be excusable had Greenpeace capitalized it and put quotes around it. Otherwise, using think differently would have still made the point, and had the bonus of grammatically correct.

My apologies for letting my pedantry show.

In the meanwhile, I doubt anyone in Cupertino was coveting Greenpeace’s approval, but I agree that Apple did the right thing in quitting the Chamber for this reason.

geoduck

I’m sorry, but this is like getting an ‘attaboy’ from the village idiot. They may be technically right but

frankly my dear I don’t give a damn.

palenoue

For the last time, “Think Different” is _not_ bad grammar!

Would you tell someone to “Think redly” instead of “Think Red?”  Or “Think fastly” instead of “Think fast?”

For all the people out there who are sick and tired of grammar nazis, use this as the acid test.  If they whine about “Think Different” being bad grammar then they are merely posers who use superficial guidelines to elevate their sad, pathetic little egos above the unschooled masses, and as such should be ignored in all matters concerning language and its use.

geoduck

If they whine about ?Think Different? being bad grammar then they are merely posers who use superficial guidelines to elevate their sad, pathetic little egos above the unschooled masses, and as such should be ignored in all matters concerning language and its use.

You know of course that’s a run-on sentence….

Bryan Chaffin

“Think Different” as an advertising campaign is, indeed, not poor grammar. One is being asked to think about the concept of “different.”

Being the pedant I already acknowledged myself to be, I will point out that I did not complain about Apple’s use of “Think Different.”

The sentence: “Apple has done the right thing, and IBM and Microsoft should think different too.”

However, should be properly written: Apple has done the right thing, and IBM and Microsoft should think differently, too.”

In short, my comments about Greenpeace’s weak attempt to co-opt Apple’s own advertising slogan stand quite well.

It’s always interesting how poor writers like to rant about “grammar nazis,” while those of us who care about American English like to look down our noses at those who flout proper grammar rules.

I’m happy to be in my camp, palenoue. I was compelled to embrace my pedantry long ago.

Also, “fastly” isn’t a word, making your comparison…embarrassing. “Fast,” however, is an adverb, making “Think Fast” both grammatically correct and a compelling expression.

None of which is meant to suggest that I think I am infallible in the grammar department. Far from it; I make mistakes, and I try to learn from those mistakes, all the time. I also like to make typos, though I strive to catch them, and appreciate the notes from readers when I don’t!

Bryan Chaffin

You know of course that?s a run-on sentence?.

HA! Pedants of the world unite!

You crack me up, Geoduck. smile :D

palenoue

You know of course that?s a run-on sentence?.

I built up a full head of steam and couldn’t stop in time.

Besides, I give people a lot of slack because they’re posting quick thoughts in an informal forum, not composing obscure literary papers for other literary types to critique.

“You argue about the poor structure of the sentence yet overlook the purpose of the phrase “Look out runaway carriage!”“

Lee Dronick

?You argue about the poor structure of the sentence yet overlook the purpose of the phrase ?Look out runaway carriage!??

Why would a runaway carriage want to look out? smile

ctopher

If you don’t look out the runaway carriage, you won’t know where you’re going.

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