HTC Ready to Take On Apple in Patent Suit

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Mobile phone maker HTC publicly announced that it is ready to “fully defend itself” over allegations that it has infringed on iPhone-related patents owned by Apple. The company found itself on the wrong end of a lawsuit with Apple at the beginning of March for accusations that it was infringing on 20 different patents the Mac and iPhone maker owns.

Apple also filed a complaint against HTC with the International Trade Commission.

“HTC disagrees with Apple’s actions and will fully defend itself,” said HTC CEO Peter Chou.

“We can sit by and watch competitors steal our patented inventions, or we can do something about it. We’ve decided to do something about it,” Apple CEO Steve Jobs said. “We think competition is healthy, but competitors should create their own original technology, not steal ours.”

HTC, however, contends that it hasn’t stolen anything from Apple. “HTC strongly advocates intellectual property protection and will continue to respect other innovators and their technologies as we have always done,” Mr. Chou said.

HTC makes several smartphone models, including some that use Google’s Android platform such as the Nexus One. Google’s Android platform shares some similarities to the iPhone OS, and there has been speculation that Android’s multi-touch support is one of the areas Apple plans to target in court.

Apple executives have previously said that the company will use whatever means necessary to defend its intellectual property. HTC hasn’t said what it has planned for its defense.

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Comments

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

HTC’s full statement is instructive. It’s positive and classy. Contrast with Apple’s statement as quoted above. Perhaps that’s just one of the problems of entrusting a college dropout to be CEO of a major corporation. Or a guy, who, according to Wikipedia, called his LSD experiences “one of the two or three most important things [he had] done in [his] life.” Sound familiar?

Patent lawsuits are ultimately about taking choices away from customers, i.e. making it likely that a customer who would have brought (“infringing”) product A will be forced (by courts restricting availability) to buy product B instead. It used to be that people bought iPhones because they really loved the product. I know that’s why I bought 2 of them, despite having to switch a large multi-state family plan to AT&T and losing the out of California numbers in the process.

Tiger

Einstein was a dropout and Dali was a drug addict.

What’s your point, that somebody CAN"T be successful because of those two things? I think in this case the evidence is overwhelming that he was the exception, not the rule. The company is ranks 4th and he personally ranks 137th as richest. Granted, wealth is not the only measure of success, character, fortitude and philanthropy are also such measures.

I guess your debate here must be about character, because he’s survived pancreatic cancer and, although private about it, is known to be very forthcoming philanthropically.

And hey, Einstein and Dali were odd characters too… grin

Andrew

While I disagree with the way Apple acts in defending it’s patents… it’s pretty sad to chalk it up to the CEOs lack of degree or past experience with psychedelic drugs.

Smith

Jobs is hardly Einstein or Dali.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Dropping lots of acid doesn’t *magically* disqualify Steve Jobs or anyone to be CEO of any company. Saying the same thing about his acid dropping experience as he now says about his new flagship product offers tremendous insight into his character. Decide for yourself if it’s good or bad.

Dropping out of college does not *magically* disqualify Steve Jobs or anyone to be CEO of any company. But it does sorta suggest an unrefined Whiskey Tango factor that materializes far too often.

“We can sit by and watch other campers steal our Pabst Blue Ribbon, or we can do something about it. We?ve decided to do something about it.” (John McClane, he is not.)

?We think drinking beers is healthy, but other campers should buy their own Old Milwaukee, not steal ours.?

Lee Dronick

Jobs is hardly Einstein or Dali.

He is hardly one of Joh Fredersen’s worker drones either and has accomplished more in his life than most people ever will.

Tiger

It’s a great day for beer references.

Is it Friday yet???

Terrin

Patent lawsuits are not always about taking choice away from customers. Apple undeniably contributed a great deal to the smartphone arena. It undoubtedly spent a ton of money doing so. The US Constitution gives it a limited right to be a monopolist in terms of it’s efforts. It simply isn’t fair that another company can benefit from all the money and effort of another company before the company bringing the true innovations to market has a chance to pay off it’s investments and reap the awards of it’s efforts. Failure to give a company that chance, removes the incentive to invest in such innovation. That truly could deprive customers of choice. The smart phone market was stagnant before Apple came along. Customers now have plenty of choice now even removing multi-touch. Further, carriers are far more competitive in terms of pricing.

Further, I fail to see how HTC is supposed to be anything but classy. Any crook busted for shop lifting would give a similar statement. The difference is most people would crucify the shoplifter before a trial. Here many are all advocating on HTC’s behalf.

It is also worth noting that Apple hardly ever sues on it’s patents. Like anybody who thinks they have been aggrieved, Apple deserves it’s day in Court.

HTC?s full statement is instructive. It?s positive and classy. Contrast with Apple?s statement as quoted above. Perhaps that?s just one of the problems of entrusting a college dropout to be CEO of a major corporation. Or a guy, who, according to Wikipedia, called his LSD experiences ?one of the two or three most important things [he had] done in [his] life.? Sound familiar?

Patent lawsuits are ultimately about taking choices away from customers, i.e. making it likely that a customer who would have brought (?infringing?) product A will be forced (by courts restricting availability) to buy product B instead. It used to be that people bought iPhones because they really loved the product. I know that?s why I bought 2 of them, despite having to switch a large multi-state family plan to AT&T and losing the out of California numbers in the process.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Puh-lease Terrin. Of course it’s 100% about taking choice away from customers. Why spend the money on lawyers suing for patent infringement if success would not lead to greater marketshare? Does Apple do this for the public good? Does Apple risk having patents invalidated just on principle? Does Apple incur the wrath of a sizable chunk of technical influencers because it wants credit in the public mind for its alleged inventions? If Apple’s intentions are anything but preserving marketshare, it deserves to be sued by its shareholders.

And “slide to unlock”... That is “invention”? Seriously? Motel 6 had it on their doors when their rooms were actually $6.

snowm@n

Apple has a right to fight for what they created because they did make and design a phone that is better then any other in my view and to insure that people don’t start taking advantage of them and start ripping off designs that is not thurs from apple and other companies. they have rights just like any other person has a rights. the only difference is that neither of us created iphone or anything that made it so we don’t know what work they put into designing such a great product. as we all know if not we would never have bought Iphone or Macs that’s my view of it all and that’s my right.

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