iSuppli: iPad 2’s Thinness Part Battery, Display, Case

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Apple achieved a 33% reducing in the iPad 2 thickness by targeting several different components and aspects of the devices structure, according to a report from IHS iSupply released Wednesday. Apple changed the battery subsystem, the way the display is assembled, and the touch overlay itself to make the iPad 2 8.8mm thick, down from the 13.4mm of the original iPad.

The biggest change, according to iSupply, is in the batter subsystem, where Apple went from a two-cell battery to a three-cell battery. Doing so allowed Apple to eliminate an injection-molded frame used to support the old battery, and the change resulted in a battery subsytem that is a mere 2.5mm thick, a 59% decrease from what would otherwise seem a tiny 6.1mm in the original iPad.

As noted in iFixIt’s teardown (and other teardowns published on the Internet), Apple also changed the way the display subsystem is assembled. Rather than using tabs, Apple now holds the display’s glass to the body of the iPad 2 with the help of a strong adhesive. This allowed Apple to entirely eliminate a stamped sheet metal frame from the iPad 2, which eliminated another .5mm when compared to the original iPad.

In addition, Apple is using a new touch screen overlay that is a stunning 25% thinner than the original iPad, taking this overlay from 0.8mm to 0.6mm. One more area was identified in the report: Apple reduced the amount of space between the case and the battery subsystem from 1.6mm to 1.3mm, a 19% decrease.

Apple hasn’t named the glass used in the device, but iSupply speculated that its a product from Asahi Glass Co. of Japan called Dragontail Glass. Asahi announced the new material at the same time the iPad 2 was announced, forming the foundation of iSupply’s speculation. The firm said that physical tests it performed on the glass in the iPad 2 found that it is more flexible than its predecessor, and said that this should increase its durability.

All of these improvements are small in real terms, yet huge in percentage terms, and they all add up to make the new iPad 2 thinner than the iPad, and thinner than any of the device’s competition. They are also a clear demonstration of how Apple looks at every single aspect of its products’ designs.

Comments

Lee Dronick

Batter? That may a tech term with which I am not familiar, but did you mean to use battery?

Chris Miller

Yeah, I think the lightness comes from them putting less starch in the iPad batter this time (and probably a little less baking soda too, so it would rise less in the oven).

VaughnSC

Everyones know you can make batter thinner with more water, but only SJ had the vision to apply it here. Clearly this new iPad stands “at the intersection of the Baking Arts and Technology.” (Or, ma be Br an has a bad ’ ’ ke .) raspberry

mhikl

Ah, the old nip ‘n tuck trick. Vanity rules in the world of Apple.

And you slow readers and yer reading specs, leave Bryan alone. An artist’s error often leads to innovation. Didn’t Twain say, to paraphrase badly, something about genius and restrictive spelling? Sounds like quibbles from some ol’ pharts.

Lee Dronick

And you slow readers and yer reading specs, leave Bryan alone. An artist?s error often leads to innovation. Didn?t Twain say, to paraphrase badly, something about genius and restrictive spelling? Sounds like quibbles from some ol? pharts.

Hey I had to search because I thought that it might have been a relatively new tech term.

Honestly as much of a gourmand as I am when I saw “batter” I did not think of cooking, but the slope at the base of castle wall or the sloped abutment under a bridge. But true enough I am bespectacled old fart.

mhikl

I’m just a wee bit jealous. I rarely catch these little errors, more often in my own posts. I bet you guys who are quick to see typing errors are good at scrabble. The game drives me nuts.

Lee Dronick

I?m just a wee bit jealous. I rarely catch these little errors, more often in my own posts. I bet you guys who are quick to see typing errors are good at scrabble. The game drives me nuts.

I think that is easier to see someone else’s typos. When I don’t have someone to edit my copy I do a few things to help myself.

1. Scan it backwards from the end, you can often spot typos that way.

2. I also may copy and paste it into a different editor, get fresh look at it.

3. Of course having spell check turned on helps, but watch out for the homophones.

I started out in this racket working in the school print shop. It was an Industrial Arts class, but we learned by providing forms, letterheads, business cards and other printed materials for the small school district. We could do our own projects as well and my father got a lot custom stuff for his work. Of course back then I was setting movable type in a composing stick. I learned to read words that were inverse, it is easier to make changes to it before it is in the chase/frame.

As to batter, we may have very well Shakepeared a new word. Batter- A wide thin battery. As in batter on a griddle.

mhikl

Sir Harry,
#1. Brilliant. Just tried it on a short story I wrote yesterday. Found 2 typos. And it was fun. Told wife and she told me to get a life.
#2. Will try, but I find time is a good part of the arsenal.
#3. Spell check, always. Those darn homophones, I’m a bit homophonobic.

How about Apple’s iPad is batter than eXoom. (Now that would be an adjective, I think.)

VaughnSC

@mhikl

+1 “Homophonobic” FTW!

Regarding having an eye for typos: I’m a developer; compilers are fussier than most editors and yet somewhat obtuse when it comes to explaining which jar of ointment the fly is in.

mhikl

VaughnSC, there are typos and then there is artistry. Sometimes the art is good. Sometimes the fly resinates.

Sadly, you are correct regarding many editors. It’s a sticky business. Have you read Eats, Shoots & Leaves, by Lynne Truss? A preliminary washroom break before reading is a must.

Lee Dronick

VaughnSC, there are typos and then there is artistry. Sometimes the art is good. Sometimes the fly resinates.

Sadly, you are correct regarding many editors. It?s a sticky business. Have you read Eats, Shoots & Leaves, by Lynne Truss? A preliminary washroom break before reading is a must.

There isn’t any poetic license in code. When I moved from GoLive to DreamWeaver I forced myself to work mostly in the code view in a large part to help exercise my brain’s left side. When writing copy I can play with words.

Lynne’s book is excellent. I also recommend Robin William’s The Mac is Not a Typewriter

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