Liquipel: Waterproof iPhones Without a Case

| Product News

Las Vegas — Liquipel is hoping to cut down on headaches from water damaged iPhones with its self-named coating that protects your combo iPod and smartphone by preventing moisture from contacting the device’s sensitive electronic components. The coating doesn’t require a case, and keeps your iPhone dry even if it’s completely submerged in water.

Liquipel saves your iPhone from water damageLiquipel saves your iPhone from water damage

The company calls Liquipel “nano sided armor,” and as long as you aren’t deep sea diving, the coating works as advertised. Liquipel showed off its handiwork at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas by pouring water over treated iPhones, which continued to work while the water beaded up and ran off their bodies.

The Liquipel protective barrier covers the outside of your iPhone as well as the electronics tucked inside. Once applied, it makes a permanent barrier that keeps water out.

Water beads up and runs off Liquipel-coated paperWater beads up and runs off Liquipel-coated paper

The company applies the coating for you, so you’ll have to ship your iPhone to them. Liquipel says it offers one-day turn around to help cut down on time without your phone.

The Liquipel application process costs US$59 plus shipping, and the company can water proof other smartphones, too.

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5 Comments Leave Your Own

iVoid

But will Apple void the warranty just for applying this?

Jeff Gamet

The coating is applied as a micro-mist sort of thing, so it probably doesn’t trip the moisture sensors. I’m betting it doesn’t void the warranty, but I’ll see if I can get an official statement from Apple.

BurmaYank

I’m fascinated by how it can apparently seal even the electrical contact surfaces in the ports for USB cord, the SIMcard and the headphone jack so as to prevent accidental water across those surfaces from causing shortcircuits there, and yet, somehow, that waterproof seal on those contact surfaces won’t also interfere with normal electrical signal transmissions/currents between those surfaces and the USB cable, SIMcard or headphone jack.

Snrub

Pure water is a poor conductor. Now the crap in the water is a different story. I’d wager that their test tank pictured there is pure water. Tap water will conduct some because of the minerals and other chemicals in it.

Lee Dronick

I?m fascinated by how it can apparently seal even the electrical contact surfaces in the ports for USB cord, the SIMcard and the headphone jack so as to prevent accidental water across those surfaces from causing shortcircuits there, and yet, somehow, that waterproof seal on those contact surfaces won?t also interfere with normal electrical signal transmissions/currents between those surfaces and the USB cable, SIMcard or headphone jack.

And not wear off by plugging cables in and removing them.

Pure water is a poor conductor. Now the crap in the water is a different story. I?d wager that their test tank pictured there is pure water. Tap water will conduct some because of the minerals and other chemicals in it.

Old timers hear may recall the story about my iPhone 3G swirling down the toilet. It fell out of my shirt pocket while I was cleaning the toilet, I grabbed it though I doubt it that it could negotiate the trap. Fortunately the water was clean, I was giving it a second flush, but yeah even tap water has minerals. As an old “Salt” I can tell you about the importance of distilled water in ship’s boilers.

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