LSD Researcher Hit Up Jobs for Money

| News

Albert Hoffman, best known for his research into the drug LSD, apparently asked Apple CEO Steve Jobs for money to fund research in psychedelic drugs in 2007. The request was for cash to help finance proposed work by Swiss psychiatrist Peter Gaser, according to the Huffington Post.

In the letter to Mr. Jobs, Mr. Hoffman asked for help in turning his changing his "problem child into a wonderchild."

Mr. Hoffman likely tapped Jobs for money knowing that the popular CEO had experimented with LSD when he was younger and assumed he found a sympathetic ear.

The letter led to a half-hour conversation where the two discussed LSD and the funding request, but Mr. Jobs never offered up a contribution. Presumably Mr. Jobs no longer felt the need to turn on, tune in and drop out.

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19 Comments Leave Your Own

Dean Lewis

In other news, a Jehovah’s Witness came to Jobs’ door the other day and they talked for about half an hour, but Jobs did not convert. And the lady in the checkout aisle at the grocery store did not convince Jobs to buy hamburger.

Dave Hamilton

Though Mr. Lewis’ comment is funny, it’s far from accurate.  The difference between the Jehovah’s Witness and LSD researcher is that it’s been widely reported that Steve Jobs took hallucinogens at points during his life and reports say he’s cited the experiences as positive. I don’t know that anyone’s ever heard Mr. Jobs talk positively about having been a Jehovah’s Witness… or a carnivore. And I believe he’s only actually ever been one of those.

Jim Cummings

Many of us no longer use psychedelics regularly or at all, yet value their role in our youth (and by extension in the lives we now live), and support the development of psychological research that uses psychedelics as one (carefully applied) tool toward fostering mental health.  It sounds to me as if Jobs offered Hoffman (the chemist who accidentally discovered LSD in the 40s, and termed it his “problem child”) the respect he deserved as a serious, thoughtful proponent of responsible use and research in psychedelics.  The personal computer revolution, and Macs in particular, are one of the many positive outcomes of the social and personal experimentation, risk-taking, and personal exploration of the 60s and 70s.  For more on the current modest resurgence of research by psychologists, see http://maps.org

Lee Dronick

I would say that every substance that has a bad reputation has good side to it if used properly and for the appropriate purpose. Deadly poisons can have a medicinal value or can be used to murder someone.

Dean Lewis

Just as a side note, I thought it was more interesting that nothing happened (he didn’t give money) and that was reported as news by Huffington Post, thus why I took the nothing happened route. wink

Plus, I have an account here and read TMO every day, so I got to comment here instead of HuffPo—even though HuffPo really deserved a wink…

Dave Hamilton

Point taken, Dean! grin

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Maybe Hoffman shouldn’t have asked for cash? Steve Jobs probably only carries a couple of Benjamins on his person. He might have been able to write a check or get him an iTunes gift card.

brett_x

He might have been able to write a check or get him an iTunes gift card.

Or maybe give him access to the latest unreleased iTunes Visualizer plug in?

Lee Dronick

Or maybe give him access to the latest unreleased iTunes Visualizer plug in?

Too dangerous, that plugin is a form of blipvert

iJack

The Silly Season is upon us.

Sigh.

geoduck

I would say that every substance that has a bad reputation has good side to it if used properly and for the appropriate purpose. Deadly poisons can have a medicinal value or can be used to murder someone.

As Wernher von Braun put it “Science does not have a moral dimension. It is like a knife. If you give it to a surgeon or a murderer, each will use it differently.”

iJack

The 1970’s + California + drugs, and you’re surprised? 
Or was that lighthearted sarcasm?

Lee Dronick

The 1970?s + California + drugs, and you?re surprised??
Or was that lighthearted sarcasm?

That was probably spam, note the link to a nursing “Jobs” site.

Should we report it as spam as we do with the “Very interesting, thanks.” posts that have been cropping up?

iJack

Well, since you have brought it to our attention, I am guessing Jeff will notice, so let him decide.  I thought the comment by “Alicia” was worth a response, if only for a chuckle.

Alicia

Guys, I was reading the follow ups on my comment. I am not spamming and it was a genuine comment on an interesting news. The moderators are free to remove the comment if they think that its an inappropriate. Cheers smile

Dave Hamilton

Indeed, Alicia’s comment was “targeted” spam, and has been flagged and disabled. Funny, though. wink

Dave Hamilton

Thanks, Alicia—The “Nursing Jobs” link in there seemed completely irrelevant and spammy, which is why it was removed. Happy to have you here at TMO and look forward to your continued comments, too.  Thanks!

Lee Dronick

Well, since you have brought it to our attention, I am guessing Jeff will notice, so let him decide.? I thought the comment by ?Alicia? was worth a response, if only for a chuckle.

“Nursing Jobs 4 Me” If Alicia was registered I would have considered it a good joke, a good pun, and you know how much I enjoy those. However, we seem to be seeing a lot spam comments from unregistered users, and it often happens when the story is several weeks old. I didn’t click on the link, I just saw the UR when I moused over it.

Lee Dronick

Alicia, get registered here, this is an informative and fun website, unsubstantiated spam accusations not withstanding.

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