Netflix Apologizes for Android Fragmentation

| News

Greg Peters, from the Netflix development team, has apologized, in the Netflix blog, to his customers for the delay in launching a Netflix app for Android, citing technology fragmentation.

In his explanation, Mr. Peters said, in part,

The hurdle has been the lack of a generic and complete platform security and content protection mechanism available for Android. The same security issues that have led to piracy concerns on the Android platform have made it difficult for us to secure a common Digital Rights Management (DRM) system on these devices. Setting aside the debate around the value of content protection and DRM, they are requirements we must fulfill in order to obtain content from major studios for our subscribers to enjoy. Although we don’t have a common platform security mechanism and DRM, we are able to work with individual handset manufacturers to add content protection to their devices. Unfortunately, this is a much slower approach and leads to a fragmented experience on Android, in which some handsets will have access to Netflix and others won’t.”

There has been a healthy discussion, both pro and con, whether there is significant fragmentation that is possibly detrimental in the Android market. At Apple’s earnings report on October 18, Apple CEO Steve Jobs cited tis kind of fragmentation as a potential problem and why Apple’s iOS has an advantage. Now, in what may be the first public use of the word ‘fragmentation’ by a major Android developer, one of those problems has come to light.

Mr. Peters predicted that selected Android devices would have the Netflix app “early next year.”

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43 Comments Leave Your Own

jfbiii

Yet another example of Apple getting its ass kicked by Android.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

And to think that Intruder accuses me of “advertising” for Android. It is quite humorous that Apple fans are reduced to sticking up for DRM as some kind of killer feature of iOS.

Here’s a hint to Mr. Peters. The market does not care about the DRM situation on the Android platform. You and your content provider partners figure it out. If you can’t figure it out, you’ll be selling to a shrinking percentage of the market that uses the incredibly lovely DRM in the Jesus Phone and on the Jesus Pad. Someone else will figure out how to stream video to this “fragmented” market, and you’ll go the way of Blockbuster.

BurmaYank

Yet another example of Apple getting its ass kicked by Android.

Sad, jfbiii’s desperate wishful pipedreaming ... so wildly off-target.  (or did I misunderstand that jfbiii was actually being sarcastic about “...Apple getting its ass kicked by Android”?)

BurmaYank

“... to Mr. Peters… (and his content provider partners)... If you can?t figure it out, you?ll be selling to a shrinking percentage of the market that uses the incredibly lovely DRM in the Jesus Phone and on the Jesus Pad… and you?ll go the way of Blockbuster

Sad, Brad’s desperate wishful pipedreaming ...

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Sad, Brad?s desperate wishful pipedreaming ...

All facts. Try again.

RonMacGuy

You have an answer for everything, Bosco.  So easy to criticize and discount the article with your “facts” when a very real issue is being addressed.  Can and should Netflix be able to find a workaround?  Sure.  But, the fragmentation is very real, no matter how much you want to discount it.  Will the fragmentation be gone in due time?  Maybe.  But today it is a real issue.  Whether you accept it or not is a different issue.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

RonMacGuy… I assume you have multiple Android handsets from multiple hardware vendors running multiple base versions of Android with multiple OEM skins on them if you’re commenting on how “real” the fragmentation problem is.

Another fact is that you don’t. Because if you did, and you used them, and you have an IQ above about 80, you’d intuitively know that “fragmentation” is a false issue dreamed up by Apple people who can’t understand how something that’s not under strict control of one company or its megalomaniac CEO can possibly have gone from near 0 to kicking the iPhone’s ass 3:2 in market share in less than 13 months.

I’m sorry, but until you can demonstrate that “fragmentation” is a real issue for for real users, you’re bringing up a red herring. I know it makes you feel good as iPhone retreats to the typical market share Apple gets for its proprietary kit. If fragmentation is really an issue, it should make you feel really bad about being on an Apple bandwagon that got lapped by such an obviously stupid strategy of having multiple companies and interests involved!! Like I said, it’s hilarious that Apple fans are embracing DRM to try to make a point about fragmentation. Might as well embrace donuts to make a point about childhood obesity.

mhikl

Getting dirty, Bosco. I remember a gentle reminder from a certain someone.

To be rude, Bosco, rumour has it, the Republicans want you bad, bad, bad. “Side track & avoid real issue” is a skill favoured in desperate quarters.

Regarding the hurdle, Nelson says “ha, ha”.

And jfbiii, you had me goin’ for a while. I withdraw my curses on you and your offspring.

jfbiii

Ah, but it’s not Apple fans embracing DRM, just as we didn’t with music. It’s content creators that continue to do so. And now, after watching Apple break the back of the labels with iTunes, studios are reluctant to allow the same thing to happen with video content. iTunes is hampered not by Steve Jobs’s megalomania so much as it is by its market penetration.

If Netflix (or anyone, for that matter) can’t figure DRM out with its content partners (who don’t care who sells their stuff so long as it retains DRM) then that content won’t be available on the amazing iOS clone that replicates everything except Apple’s profits for phone OEM’s.

As for Android going from zero to 3:2 in 13 months, that’s dead easy: Apple isn’t targeting the 60% of the market that can’t generate a 30% margin on a phone they care to slap their name on. Plenty of other people are willing to sell the kinds of smart phones that appeal to that segment of the market, even if it means making much less profit per device. Because that’s still a LOT of money, small percentage or not. Additionally, in the U.S., Android benefits from AT&T lock-in. In more ways than just the fact that it doesn’t have to compete with the iPhone on every carrier. Not that Google is taking advantage and helping to reduce carriers to the dumb pipes they should be.

I think I’ll count Netflix as a demonstration of fragmentation.

RonMacGuy

Wow, no kidding.  He gets all over me for being a bit too sarcastic with one of his posts, and he hits me with an IQ insult.  I trust Bosco will apologize as sincerely as I did a few weeks ago.

Well, I assure you my IQ is above 80, and yet I can still apply common sense to the situation, as a lot of people obviously are here.  And Bosco, I would expect more of you then the lame market share response here.  Wow, that is just so sad.  How many different versions of Android are out there?  On how many phones?  Plus an incompatible-for-tablet version they are rushing to market?  And yet you argue against fragmentation?  Spin your stories and your facts, Bosco.  You are not fooling anyone.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Awfully sensitive. I did not say that you had a low IQ. I did say that if you had at least the IQ of someone capable of potty training, fragmentation as you call it would not be an issue for you. I say that based on experience with multiple handsets from multiple manufacturers running multiple Android versions and multiple skins. I can tell the way you talk about fragmentation (kinda like a 1950s Protestant mom discussing Catholic girls) that you have no experience to base your thoughts.

The facts are that iPhone market share continues to decline. And iPad market share is beginning to decline. See the story about analysts worried Apple won’t make it’s predicted numbers in Q4. I have a theory about why that happens. It’s that good enough will beat very good if it’s more available. But I don’t even think that applies here. On the phone side, Android is better, and those who have used both iPhone and Android extensively generally agree on that. iPhone might be better if you’re a hipster. But factoring in everything about the platforms, Android is better for 1.5x as many people and growing. There’s no spin, no stories, just facts in the data.

mhikl

Logic, RonMacGuy. Envyboys obfuscate, they can’t logicate. But they sure are slick tricksters when inanely and anally obfuscating a way out of their briar patch of befuddlement and envyment.

RonMacGuy

Not that sensitive, really.  You humor me, Bosco, even in your passive aggressive ways.  So based on your genius level intelligence and your experience with all things Android you are smarter and more correct than a guy from the Netflix development team?  Smarter than Steve Jobs?  So, the Netflix development team is wrong?  There is absolutely no fragmentation issue at all for someone who has above average intelligence?  Give me a break.

I can’t argue with someone who can’t admit they are ever wrong.  More iPhones are sold each quarter than the previous quarter.  What you quote as iPhone failings (and iPad for that matter) is just the nature of a competitive environment.  Yes, stories from analysts that they are worried about Apple not making their numbers - the same analysts that are amazed each quarter at how much Apple beats their forecast.  iPad market share is 95% - so now that a competitor is FINALLY getting into the marketplace you sit on your high horse and say how iPad is now in trouble because of Android.  Again I say, give me a break.  95% market share is unsustainable as competitors begin to enter the market.  You are a technological genius but not very business intelligent, in my opinion.  You credit the technology of Android as the reason for Apple decline without understanding basic economic theory.

I remember you years ago talking about how Apple would fail in a down economy.  Yet they continued to grow during a multi-year recession with premium-priced products making huge margins.  Yet you never really accepted you were wrong.  So what you call facts now really aren’t facts.  But keep arguing against the world.  That’s what Bosco is good at!!

RonMacGuy

Hey Bosco, look at the 5:25 MacObserver Apple Stock Watch - there’s an analyst that expects record Mac sales.  “Year over year Mac unit growth of 22% to 28%”.  So, help me to understand.  Is this a fact?  You quote so many “facts” I want to make sure I understand.

LOL.

RonMacGuy

Logic, RonMacGuy. Envyboys obfuscate, they can?t logicate. But they sure are slick tricksters when inanely and anally obfuscating a way out of their briar patch of befuddlement and envyment.

But mhikl, Bosco is SOOOOOO smart!!  I know this because he tells me so!!  Doesn’t that make him right?!?!?

grin

mhikl

I dunno about smart, RonMacGuy. You’ve got a double digit IQ. I’ve only got a single digit one, near the top end, though; one of those round curly ones. Here’s my favourite bedtime song. Bosco should be able to read and sing along, even if he has trouble interpreting its facts.

Row row row your boat
Madly ‘gainst the stream,
Envily, envily, envily, envily,
Reality’s but a dream.

This is more fun than Judge Judy.

RonMacGuy

LMAO.  mhikl, I like your style.  Us dummies should stick together.  Or is it “we” dummies?  I always get those two confused.

Funny how 7 major releases of Android platform in less than two years doesn’t qualify as fragmentation, but what do I know?

BurmaYank

John M’s link was right on

mhikl

Agreed, RonMacGuy,

The caps are on; the gloves are off.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

I remember you years ago talking about how Apple would fail in a down economy.

Your memory is horrible. I wouldn’t have made that point 18 months ago. Any more facts you’d like to make up?

nealg

And to think that Intruder accuses me of ?advertising? for Android. It is quite humorous that Apple fans are reduced to sticking up for DRM as some kind of killer feature of iOS.

Here?s a hint to Mr. Peters. The market does not care about the DRM situation on the Android platform. You and your content provider partners figure it out. If you can?t figure it out, you?ll be selling to a shrinking percentage of the market that uses the incredibly lovely DRM in the Jesus Phone and on the Jesus Pad. Someone else will figure out how to stream video to this ?fragmented? market, and you?ll go the way of Blockbuster.

Bosco,

You are a great barometer of spinning whatever news comes out in the worst way for Apple and its customers.

First, no one is sticking up for DRM. You are making the straw man argument here. DRM is the fact on the ground that everybody has to deal with. Not just Apple but Google, MSFT and Netflix. Without DRM, I would think that would make content delivery much easier.

Second, with you being a developer, which case would you rather develop applications for, all other things being equal(which we know is not necessarily the case)? Where you need to code for 1 device with 1 OS that sells a million copies and need only 1 application or a device where they sell 2 million copies but there are 20 different devices with multiple Oses?

It would seem that the best bang for your buck would be to develop for the 1 OS/device since that should be where the greatest profit is, all other things being equal. That is not saying that it isn’t worthwhile to develop for the other platform but the logistics, manpower and therefore profit situation will be more challenging.

No need to make anything more out of it than this. This is an advantage for the Apple platform. Are there advantages for the Android platform? Sure. But that is not what the Netflix statement was talking about.

Neal

FlipFriddle

Why is Netflix apologizing for something out of their control? The fact here is that Netflix can’t get a player working for Android and they can for iOS products.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Second, with you being a developer, which case would you rather develop applications for, all other things being equal(which we know is not necessarily the case)? Where you need to code for 1 device with 1 OS that sells a million copies and need only 1 application or a device where they sell 2 million copies but there are 20 different devices with multiple Oses?

I can tell you’re not a professional software developer and have no training in the field by that question. When Steve Jobs made that exact point citing a chart published by the TweetDeck team, those guys came back and said he was full of crap and completely misinterpreting what they were saying. In fact, they have a couple guys working not full time on TweetDeck for Android, and manage to cover a plethora of devices, OS versions, and skins just fine.

And for what it’s worth, I’d be most happy developing with one source base for all the devices, Android and iOS. It’s how I work on the desktop, and the process has an apparently unintuitive advantage of exposing bugs on one platform cheaply that would be more expensive to track down on the other(s).

The right thing for the Netflix developers to do is to go to the OHA, perhaps join if they haven’t, and make sure the OHA knows the issue. That engages Google and the handset makers to ensure that secure GUIDs (what Netflix is missing) are in the devices. BTW, on a Mac, that secure GUID is your primary ethernet card’s MAC address. Real complicated stuff.

mhikl

Your memory is horrible. I wouldn?t have made that point 18 months ago. Any more facts you?d like to make up?

Now go to BurmaYanks link

Sad, Brad?s desperate wishful pipedreaming ...

I was too lazy to read the article, at first. But it says it all (about his obfuscation tactics ). In short it says . . .

? simple denial - deny the reality of the unpleasant fact altogether
? minimisation - admit the fact but deny its seriousness (a combination of denial and rationalisation), or
? projection - admit both the fact and seriousness but deny responsibility.

My twelve year old brother sees through the trickster’s means, and “mean” is meant.

Neal, I missed your post. I would further add a third description.

? ...(insult, attack and harangue anyone and any issue in defiant and by all aggressive means.)

nealg

When Steve Jobs made that exact point citing a chart published by the TweetDeck team, those guys came back and said he was full of crap and completely misinterpreting what they were saying.

Bosco,

You are right, I am not a software developer but I am not sure what that has to do with my point. But my point was that one device/os, other things being equal, is less expensive to develop for than multiple os/devices. Therefore, from that standpoint, it should be easier to develop for iOs than for Android. That is all that Netflix is saying.  You seem to agree with this in your second paragraph.

I also think you did not see some of the same things that I read about the Twitter stuff you mentioned. From memory, what Jobs referenced was what was up on a blog from Twitter people and they did say that Android was a pain to develop for given the number of different configuration and devices. The interesting thing would be to know how many people and how much time it took to develop Apps for iOs vs Android and the costs involved. I would guess that it would take significantly less resources to develop for iOs devices vs Android devices. All the other denials was Twitter people trying to be politically correct and not offend anyone, IMO.

Neal

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Good grief Neal. The TweetDeck (Jobs called it TwitterDeck) crew put up a pie chart of all the devices and versions that were using the newest version. Some in the press called it “fragmentation”. Some called it diversity to celebrate. Jobs got up and said it was a problem. He was rebuked by the TweetDeck developers the same day.

But my point was that one device/os, other things being equal, is less expensive to develop for than multiple os/devices. Therefore, from that standpoint, it should be easier to develop for iOs than for Android.

Your “point” seems like a “common sense” conclusion. And it is, in the same vein that my 88-year old grandmother thinking she is safer flying because there are D-students grabbing crotches and breasts left and right in the name of security is making a “common sense” conclusion. Basically, both are bullshit, and if you were an experience developer who has to get stuff done to eat, you’d know it. And BTW, for Android, you typically develop in Java, while for iOS, it’s Objective-C. One advantage of Java over C dialects is that you can “crash” by dereferencing null or bogus pointers. That alone skews the lifecycle development economics in favor of Android considerably.

nealg

Good grief Neal.

Bosco,

Just trying to have an amicable discussion. This is from the TweetDeck blog talking about the fragmentation

http://blog.tweetdeck.com/android-ecosystem

Fragmentation is an issue, even though they say it isn’t in this interview. just try taking off your anti apple glasses on what the developer is saying here and read between the lines

http://www.theandroidforum.com/blog/developer-interview-series-tweetdeck-for-androidae?s-max-howell-posted-by-stephen-tenerowicz-in-appsgames-news/

From the sound of things, it sounds like there is good and bad in both worlds. Each OS has its own challenges.

Sorry, but I am not getting your common sense argument, I guess, because I am not a developer. From my point of view, walks like a duck, talks like a duck must be a duck(decided not to use the cheech and chong version). I guess we will agree to disagree.

Neal

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Neal,

Try to wrap your head around it this way. At the end of the blog post which supplies the chart Steve Jobs used to rail against “fragmentation”, they say:

We were really shocked to see the number of custom roms, crazy phones and general level of customization/hackalicious nature of Android. From our perspective it’s pretty cool to have our app work on such a wide variety of devices and Android OS variations.

They’re the ones who see all this diversity and develop a very popular app (TweetDeck) for it. And they don’t see it as a problem, because it’s not, stuff just works if you program to the Android API levels. They see diversity as something to celebrate. They’re the developers you are so concerned about and who you have asked “common sense” economic preference questions about, and who gave you an answer that does not support the Jobs/Gruber thesis of “fragmentation” being a terrible (or even slightly bad) thing.

I actually think it’s funny that Apple fans latch onto “fragmentation” as an argument against Android. (A) It’s not working, “scoreboard b*tches” as the kids say. And (B) it’s not actually an issue that hurts the platform. Well anyway, believe what you like. All this fragmentation will just propel Android to a 4:1 advantage over iPhone in smartphone sales a year from now, and probably see the same 3:2 ratio on tablets that we now see on phones.

-Brad

gslusher

See the story about analysts worried Apple won?t make it?s predicted numbers in Q4.

First, it’s “its,” not “it’s.”

Second, those are not Apple’s predicted numbers. Apple never releases predictions of specific product sales. Apple does “predict”—or, rather, “give guidance” on overall revenue, earnings, and margins. The guidance from Apple is usually conservative, though this last analyst call, Apple’s guidance seemed to be less conservative.

What you may be referring to are predictions by various analysts. Many of those are pure WAGs, based on as such “hard data” as counting people walking out of Apple stores with iPad boxes. Most of the pros have been soundly beaten by the amateurs, including several who post on the Apple Finance Board here on TMO, plus Andy Zacky and Turley Muller.

For example, we saw several articles lamenting that iPad sales had “disappointed,” even though they were actually quite good—more than the iPhone in its similar quarter after launch. Actual iPad sales were a bit lower than the analysts WAGs, not Apple’s predictions. (We have no idea what Apple’s internal expectations were. I would guess that Apple had expected much LOWER sales; otherwise, they wouldn’t have had the supply problems they did.)

Is there an effect of missing even the analysts’ WAGs? Of course. Some institutions believe the estimates, even from analysts who have been consistently far off, and base their investment decisions on those (or similar) estimates. (What individual investors like me believe is pretty much irrelevant; AAPL’s price is driven mostly by institutions like hedge funds, in part because relatively few shares are actively traded.)

So, if Apple misses the analysts’ predictions, the price of AAPL will fall—it often does after an earnings call, even when Apple announces a blowout quarter. (There’s an adage to “buy the rumor, sell the news” that, unfortunately, is often correct.) However, the price of AAPL appears to be pretty much irrelevant to Apple’s management—even though they all own a lot of AAPL stock. They don’t seem to make decisions in order to boost the stock price or mollify stockholders, as Microsoft has done recently. Instead, they focus on the company and customers, then employees and suppliers, more than stockholders. In the long run, that’s sound practice, even for stockholders, many of which (e.g., hedge funds) have very limited time horizons.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

First, it?s ?its,? not ?it?s.?

You’re right. I apologize to all on the board for this typo. My point though, is not about the price of AAPL, but that iPad market share of tablet space will sink and quickly. What you guys call “fragmentation” will in fact be the key driver. Steve thinks a 7” tablet form factor is a DOA size. In reality, it’s a great size for many tablet applications. Look at the Kindle or Nook. The latter is an Android 2.1 powered tablet, BTW.

Fragmentation, as you all mockingly refer to it, lets the market experiment with all sorts of configurations (each of which, ignoring license issues, *magically* works with most of the software in the ecosystem). It lets one manufacturer make the perfect device for me and another make the perfect device for you. And if I change my mind about what the perfect device is, well, you saw the TweetDeck chart!

?Viva la fragmentation!

Modena

Anyone who dismisses Netflix’ challenge does not understand what they are talking about.

DRM is device and OS dependent. The device manufacturers use different components and also configure Android differently. This means a full testing regimen and custom code for every device that they want to offer their service on.

That does not come cheap or easily. When Apple finally releases an iPhone for Verizon, I’m expecting that Apple will surpass 50% of the smartphone market in the US.

For app developers, this will reduce their efforts to support only a few platforms which will have the effect of choosing the winners and losers in the market.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

I have a question for all of the IANASDs (“I am not a software developer"s)  weighing in on DRM here… Apple iTunes uses DRM for motion pictures. How does Apple deliver iTunes for Windows and support 5 basic OS versions (XP, Vista 32-bit, 7 32-bit, Vista 64-bit, 7 64-bit) on literally thousands of devices? By all of you’re logic, that should be impossible, or at least *magical*.

Now reread Modena’s comment and decide who doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

Modena

I didn’t say it was impossible - I said it doesn’t come cheap or easy.

You have to QA each device and implementation of the software. Apple has a lab with all kinds of systems running various OS’s with different patches to ensure their products work on all of those platforms. Even then, Apple owns Fairplay so they can build-in cross platform support in their code to make managing and testing it easier.

Netflix does not own any DRM solution so they are always implementing a third party solution to protect content. Netflix also has to be prepared to support all of those variations after you release the product. This means education, training, and test systems.

That’s not only a technological challenge, it is a resource challenge, it is a budget challenge. I work for a software developer and have to deal with QA, release cycles, product management, and support every single day.

At the end of the day, you end up making business decisions to support only a limited set of devices and a limited set of OS’s.

That’s reality.

RonMacGuy

Bosco, I must say that I used to have some level of respect for you.  But I have grown tired of your stubbornness on fragmentation and both your direct as well passive aggressive insults.  You have lost my respect.  I wish you well in life, but will no longer argue with you.  You pick and choose what you feel are weaknesses in everyone’s response, spew your so-called facts and reject everything else.  So many valid arguments are ignored while you continue to attempt to sway everyone to your way of thinking, even when you are so obviously wrong.  So sad, as I really enjoyed the way you used to post.  But lately you are so bitter you just leave a bad taste in everyone’s mouths.  I hope others follow suit and stop catering to your garbage.  So long!!

mhikl

Yes!

It only takes one to start an army.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Why is it always so personal with you RonMacGuy? Seriously, the last thing I’m concerned about, just after whether President Obama is eating enough fiber, is whether you, RonMacGuy, have any respect for me. Considering how hopelessly uninformed you are about how Android works, for example, I’d consider it a badge of honor if I cared. But I don’t.

Oh, by the way, you still have not given a concrete example of why “fragmentation” (a word describing multiple devices, multiple vendors, multiple OS versions) is actually a problem. You just say it obviously is. I’ve pointed out a developer who Steve Jobs cited who said it’s not, and that they ship their very high profile Android app with the part-time work of two employees.

mhikl

blah, blah, blah, blah, blah!

RonMacGuy

No Bosco, the Netflix development team says it is.  You simply disagree with them.  I simply agree with them (and many others who talk about it) that fragmentation is causing them grief.  Likewise, you offer no actual concrete examples of why fragmentation is not a problem.  How can Netflix have issues with something that is not a problem?  This entire discussion is tied to this line:  “Now, in what may be the first public use of the word ?fragmentation? by a major Android developer, one of those problems has come to light.”  So what makes you better or smarter than a major Android developer?  Please answer that!!

Whoops, I got sucked in again!!  Oh, and I don’t care that you don’t care!!  LOL.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

How is this a problem for users? Will Netflix throw up their hands and concede the motion picture streaming market on the dominant handset platform to another company? They have plenty of incentive in users times monthly fees to solve this low level problem or work with Microsoft (their DRM provider) to solve the problem. The Netflix developers are whining. And they’re doing it over a “feature” that benefits nobody (including the motion picture owners it pretends to protect) and has been soundly rejected in the music business.

And actually, I did offer a concrete example of diversity being something to celebrate and not causing any issues at all for one of the most popular apps on the platform. An example that Steve Jobs misused in an investor conference call and for which he was immediately rebuked.

Oh, and what if this diversity on the Android platform results in less stringent DRM or a discussion of whether it’s actually necessary? Do Apple fans then become shills en mass for the TV networks?

nealg

I actually think it?s funny that Apple fans latch onto ?fragmentation? as an argument against Android. (A) It?s not working, ?scoreboard b*tches? as the kids say. And (B) it?s not actually an issue that hurts the platform. Well anyway, believe what you like. All this fragmentation will just propel Android to a 4:1 advantage over iPhone in smartphone sales a year from now, and probably see the same 3:2 ratio on tablets that we now see on phones.

Bosco,

How about this

http://www.appleinsider.com/articles/10/11/19/angry_birds_maker_apologizes_for_android_fragmentation_issues.html

From 2developers now, Netflix and Angry Birds. You can argue against fragmentation all you want, but for some developers and programs, it is an issue.

Neal

Neal

RonMacGuy

How is this a problem for users?

Are you really that ignorant?  It is obviously a problem for users if developers can’t quickly and easily develop apps that work across multiple android platforms.  It is obviously a problem when users have an unlimited Netflix account for their home but can’t run the software on their android phone.  You talk in other articles that android is superior since it doesn’t have the constraints that iOS puts in place with its censoring and control, yet major developers are struggling to write code that works across the many versions of android out there, delaying when android users can get their apps.  Is it not an issue when you can get Netflix on a Wii but not on android?  Give me a break.  And this is obviously a big enough issue that doesn’t take days or weeks to address.  “Mr. Peters predicted that selected Android devices would have the Netflix app ?early next year.?  So, months away, and not for all versions of android.  Sounds significant to me if I am paying $10 a month and can’t access my movies.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Neal: How about this then? Yes, there are phones running Android with low performing hardware. That’s a feature, not a bug. It makes Android accessible to more people. It makes many of the silly Android tablets reach the price points previously occupied by digital photo frames and in time will probably give them Android Marketplace access. Where is your iOS powered photo frame? Where is your 7” iOS powered ebook reader?

Even the Angry Birds “problem” is no worse than what PC software developers faced with 1024x600 netbooks. It’s an opportunity. And it has no centralized gatekeeper getting in the way of market experiments.

nealg

Bosco,

The argument you were making was that fragmentation is not an issue for developers. Not that diversity is a feature. There are plusses and minuses with this degree of diversity. But when 2 major developers come out in the same week and say fragmentation is an issue for them, it would seem this part of the discussion is not worth arguing about anymore, at least for me IMO.

Neal

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