New Apple Ad Jabs at Laptop Hunters

| News

 

Apple rolled out two new Get a Mac commercials late on Monday that poke at Microsoft's Laptop Hunters ads. Both ads feature John Hodgman and Justin Long in their familiar roles as PC and Mac.

Apple's new Top of the Line Ad

The Top of the Line commercial also features Patrick Warburton, well known for his roles on Seinfeld and The Tick, as a high-end PC that's happy to point out that viruses and headaches are part of the experience when you buy a Windows laptop. Surprise points out the same types of issues with a new computer buyer that's being misled.

Both commercials are available in QuickTime format at the Apple Web site.

 

Sign Up for the Newsletter

Join the TMO Express Daily Newsletter to get the latest Mac headlines in your e-mail every weekday.

Comments

davebarnes

Both a very funny.
So which ad agency would you rather work at?

Lee Dronick

So which ad agency would you rather work at?

The laptop hunter ads are not bad, but they are not great so of course I would rather work at TBWA.

How about working at the agency that does the .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

MOSiX Man

How about working at the agency that does the Dell lollipop ad?

As much as I hate to admit it, while being really annoying in one sense, the latest Dell ads are very effective in the fact that they grab your attention and are hard to forget (try as I might). They follow the surprisingly effective formula of not really talking much (if at all) about anything specific, but flashing a product or brand name a few times while putting on a catchy, cool, or at least (as in this case) interesting song and dance with memorable imagery.

Did they learn that from Apple? Maybe not, but Apple has definitely put that same formula to good use, especially for selling (Carl Sagan voice) billions and billions of iPods. (Slight exaggeration, I know.)

These ads and may convince some consumers to buy Dell laptops instead of an HP, Acer or other bargain brand laptop. However, I think they are rather unlikely to get anybody who is intending to buy a Mac laptop to change their mind and buy a Dell laptop. (Not that that is necessarily the aim of those ads, mind you.) Apple really has become largely accepted, by most consumers, as <i>the<> high-quality, ‘you get what you pay for’ choice in computers.

At one time, most of the techie people I know (I used to be the only Mac user among all the technical support, in the U.S., for Linksys) that turned their noses up at the idea of buying a Mac, since you could get a similarly spec’ed Window Laptop, for considerably less money, and they could build a Windows PC for a lot less. Now, however, many of those same people recognize the value inherent in a Mac - It just works.

Lee Dronick

As much as I hate to admit it, while being really annoying in one sense, the latest Dell ads are very effective in the fact that they grab your attention and are hard to forget (try as I might).

Yes, it is like trying to get the Free Credit Report.com jingle out of your head. Or the headache inducing HeadOn headache medication commercials.

“They follow the surprisingly effective formula of not really talking much (if at all) about anything specific, but flashing a product or brand name a few times while putting on a catchy, cool, or at least (as in this case) interesting song and dance with memorable imagery.”

Those type of ads do work on a big percentage of the population. Lisa Simpson would have something to say about that. smile

JonGl

I dunno. The “Top of the Line” ad ends on a potentially sour note. The implication that all who buy PCs are compromising their morals. I think this one could back fire…

-)on

OS11

Where is the jab at the Hunter Ads? I’ve never seen it, these are the same ads Apple has been running for years, the Hunter ads have never been touched upon.

My sense is Apple needs to move beyond the “Virus” topic, they’ve done that 15 or more times. They need to go back to Apple included benefits like in iLife or iWork or gosh, the Mac OS!

I think PC tripping over his laptop, it falls from the desk costing him $400 to fix, then Mac, simply pulling out the magnetic cord for free, would do WONDERS for perception that Macs are truly better devices.

The could do “Lit Keys”, “Location Aware Macs” that are in Snow Leopard, a focus on extreme battery life of Mac Laptops, on and on…

Viruses are getting boring Apple… time to show more REAL benefits of owning a Mac.

Lee Dronick

Viruses are getting boring Apple? time to show more REAL benefits of owning a Mac.

I read on an RSS feed that Snow Leopard will include some antivirus protection. See this at Intego

alaskaboy

Speaking of service:  Yesterday morning I had a problem with the Mail application.  I called AppleCare (waited about 3 minutes for them to answer) knowing I was out of my AppleCare service contract and was nicely told that.  The tech said they’d spend “a minute” with me despite that.  I quickly explained what was wrong and was told they’d send info to me on the problem.  She also gave me a quick fix.  All this in about a minute.  I quickly fixed the problem and am very satisfied.  Now that’s the type of service I like.  How long would I have had to wait for an answer from any of the PC manufactures, Microsoft, and 3rd Party, etc— that’s right, I’d still be holding today 24 hours later.  Nuf said.

daemon

Speaking of service:  Yesterday morning I had a problem with the Mail application.  I called AppleCare (waited about 3 minutes for them to answer) knowing I was out of my AppleCare service contract and was nicely told that.  The tech said they?d spend ?a minute? with me despite that.  I quickly explained what was wrong and was told they?d send info to me on the problem.  She also gave me a quick fix.  All this in about a minute.  I quickly fixed the problem and am very satisfied.  Now that?s the type of service I like.  How long would I have had to wait for an answer from any of the PC manufactures, Microsoft, and 3rd Party, etc? that?s right, I?d still be holding today 24 hours later.  Nuf said.

Um… 1. What was the problem. 2. Every manufacturer offers help to people who buy their products (when was the last time you called Toshiba or Asus - I’m guessing never) even when they’re outside warranty.

Alaskaboy

I guess the problem was my sign-in had got ‘corrupted’ (my term) while I was leaving Europe after 2 weeks (Hungary thru Germany over the Arctic route).  Anyway, it worked well there - just put in password and hooked up to there DSLA.  The tech’s help was ‘right on.’  I’m really at a loss on the Mac repair end of things as it’s rare an adverse event occurs.  From what my PC owning friends say, they’re got lots of experience in fixing the problems.

In my work, I use PCs frequently at various companies (mining, oil & gas and a few smaller companies).  These days, due to the frequency of PC breakdowns, each of companies have their own IT ‘repair’ guys in-house.  Even the smaller companies have a list of outside techs to call.  Those guys sure love PCs, something about ‘job assurance.’  We just call them and they get there as soon as possible, which isn’t ASAP because they’ve generally got so many calls ahead of me. 

And you’re right, I don’t call ‘the computer companies’, not anymore anyway.  Our time is to valuable to spend sitting there on the phone listening to elevator music while you wait for a tech who is hard to understand and is 6-8 time zones away.  Anyway, that was my experience when I was calling several years ago.  From what you’re inferring, those are ‘the old days.’  Now, I guess, the PCs rarely need repair or the techs answer in a couple of minutes.  They’re also probably glad to help you with you’re nearly 4 year old machine like mine without any charge.

Have a good one ...

daemon

I?m really at a loss on the Mac

As evidenced by your complete inability to explain what your “problem” was, and what the “right on” solution was from Apple.

AlaskaBoy

Exactly ... the Mac techs are so smart, that with even minimal description of a problem, they can recommend a fix ... as opposed to a office visit by a PC tech.  I love it.  Thanks for the added comment.

daemon

Exactly ... the Mac techs are so smart, that with even minimal description of a problem, they can recommend a fix ... as opposed to a office visit by a PC tech.  I love it.  Thanks for the added comment.

So what was the problem and solution?

AlaskaBoy

Sorry, I didn’t initially recognize that you were asking a question:  “... and what the ?right on? solution was from Apple.”

The problem:  I could not send or receive email though all everything else was seemingly working properly.  Other than that, I did’t know.

The Tech said to go to File then Preferences.
Then Account(s).
Then highlight all the Account(s) in the left column.
Then delete the Account(s) by clicking on the Minus (-) at the bottom left.
Then click on the Plus (+) and set up a new account.
This was easily done because all the info was there except my Password. 
Once I inserted the PW and hit the Return Key, I could see the Mail program come alive and was starting to download e-mail.  Mail had to re-download all 941 emails into their respective mailboxes.  I went for coffee.

Mac = Facta, non verba   (“deeds, not words”)

Like I said, I drive a vehicle, I change the oil every 2500 miles to insure good care, and other than that, I don’t know how to fix these complicated machines.

Log-in to comment