Photograph of Apple’s New Fifth Ave. Apple Cube

| News

Apple unveiled its new Fifth Ave. Apple Store entrance, which is also sometimes called the Cube, on Friday. We covered that news earlier, but since then our own Chuck La Tournous was able to get a photograph of the amazing new structure, which we present below.

The new version is essentially the same size as the old entrance, but rather than using 90 panels of glass to construct the structure, Apple came up with a way use just 15 panels—and, as you can see in the photo below, it is a remarkable effect.

Apple's New Fifth Ave. Apple Store Cube

Apple’s new Fifth Ave. Apple Store Cube
Photo by Chuck La Tournous
(Click the image for a larger version)

Sign Up for the Newsletter

Join the TMO Express Daily Newsletter to get the latest Mac headlines in your e-mail every weekday.

7 Comments Leave Your Own

John Martellaro

Chuck - what serendipity. Lovers kissing amidst the love for Apple. Wow.

Bryan Chaffin

I had missed that, John. Too cool. smile

mrmwebmax

+

OMG that’s stunning. “The Cube” now has the same minimalist aesthetic as Apple’s actual products. Question: Just how much does Apple really know about glass fabrication? Glass cubes, glass staircases, a proposed new HQ with not a single straight piece of glass…wonder if they could spin off a division and actually market their glass expertise to others???

iJack

Lovers kissing amidst the love for Apple. Wow.

I’d be willing to bet you’d see that every 10 minutes outside a Paris Apple Store.  Cube or no cube, and serendipity would have nothing to do with it.

iJack

Just how much does Apple really know about glass fabrication?

There is nothing really new here, and what there is I’ll wager Apple didn’t invent it.  There are structures and part-structures like this dotted all over America and Europe.  I remember some town hall in England in the late 60’ ??early 70’s that was quite similar, and more that a couple of early IMB research centers with the same aesthetic.

Bryan Chaffin

Walter Isaacson’s Steve Jobs biography said that Apple was quite involved with the German company making the panels for this store and the stores in China. They’ll be making the panels for the spaceship HQ, too.

Apple went so far as to build the factory (in China) where they are made once it was determined that the company’s existing facilities couldn’t handle the job. The book didn’t specify who owned what when it came to that factory.

As for it being “nothing new,” Occam’s Razor suggests otherwise. If these panels had been available when this store was built, Apple would have used them.

iJack

As for it being ?nothing new,? Occam?s Razor suggests otherwise. If these panels had been available when this store was built, Apple would have used them.

For starters, I said nothing really new,” a distinction you overlooked.  It was also a response to mrmgraphics rather breathless comment,  ”?wonder if they could spin off a division and actually market their glass expertise to others??? “  Large structural glass panels bolted to glass columns or glass beams has been around for a decades as a system.  The same is true of glass staircases.

Did they manufacture panels longer or stronger than had been made before?  Possibly.  But if so, not by much.  Your statement, “once it was determined that the company?s existing facilities couldn?t handle the job,” holds the key; it was a manufacturing problem overcome, not a new invention.

An analogy might be the difference between Leopard and Snow Leopard, though I suspect an advance not even that great.

Occam?s Razor is a principle that recommends selecting from among different hypotheses, the one that makes the fewest new assumptions.  Since I know the technology predates the Fifth Avenue cube by many years, it is safe for me to assume there is nothing really new here.

Log-in to comment