Pink Floyd, EMI Agree to New Distribution Deal

| iTunes

EMI this week patched up their differences with venerable rock band Pink Floyd, announcing a new five-year distribution deal that will keep the group’s music on iTunes in album form and as individual tracks. The contract covers Pink Floyd’s 14 studio and three live albums, and it ends the legal acrimony that arose last year when the band sued EMI.

Last August, the band’s music began disappearing from iTunes and other digital distribution outlets as the previous deal with EMI expired amid a lawsuit filed earlier in the year. Allegations of unpaid royalties were central to the legal claim by Pink Floyd, which also objected to the sale of its songs as individual tracks, arguing that so many of them flow into each other that they shouldn’t be listened to out of context.

However, the band seems to have given in on that point, since consumers can once again purchase Pink Floyd tracks individually. As TIME’s Techland site noted: “Though Pink Floyd might be disappointed, the new agreement allows fans to continue to exercise their right to listen to ‘Money’ instead of having to go through the entire Dark Side of the Moon.”

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Comments

Lee Dronick

Pink Floyd has a point, but even if I am forced to buy the entire album I can arrange tracks to my liking in a playlist.

Nonsuch

I guess Delicate Sound of Thunder is still dead.

Substance

I love Pink Floyd and agree that if anyone can make an argument for the integrity of buying the entire album over individual tracks, it’s them (take note, Metallica).  But their argument wears thin when FM radio has sliced and diced the choice tracks off their albums (well, 3 of them at least) for years. 

And it’s a consumers world.  For years consumers were led by the RIAA in the direction of buying whole albums (that kept going up in price despite technology which made the printing of music ever cheaper) of mostly filler to get their hands on a few good tracks.  The ability to download individual tracks puts the power back in consumers hands and forces artists and their labels to put more emphasis on releasing quality, not quantity.

furbies

I love Pink Floyd and agree that if anyone can make an argument for the integrity of buying the entire album over individual tracks

Pink Floyd has a point, but even if I am forced to buy the entire album I can arrange tracks to my liking in a playlist.

I have just about every Floyd album, and unless I’m imbibing something illegal and want to hear all the versions of “Careful with that axe Eugene”, one after the other with the sub woofer turned up high, I play the albums in track order….

CityGuide

Sorry for the circumspect post, but the idea of “forcing artists” to create music one person deems “quality” seems a little heavy-handed. My folks never appreciated Pink Floyd, and wondered why anyone would choose that as a name instead of something sensible like “Duke Ellington”. wink

cb50dc

why anyone would choose that as a name instead of something sensible like ?Duke Ellington?

And by the way, which one’s Duke? :D

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