President Obama, Tim Cook Named in $20B NSA Privacy Lawsuit

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Apple CEO Tim Cook, along with President Barak Obama, U.S. Attorney Genreal Eric Holder, NSA Director Keith Alexander, and the CEOs of several other companies have all been named in a US$20 billion class action lawsuit over privacy violations related to the PRISM domestic surveillance program. The lawsuit was filed by Larry Klayman who clearly isn't pleased with reports that the National Security Agency has allegedly been collecting information from several technology-related companies, and is calling the lawsuit part of a move to stop government tyranny.

Apple & CEO Tim Cook named in privacy class action lawsuitApple & CEO Tim Cook named in privacy class action lawsuit

Mr. Klayman said in a statement,

This and the Verizon class action will serve to unify all political and social persuasions in our great nation to wage a second American revolution, one that is peaceful and legal – but pursued with great resolve and force. Government dishonesty and tyranny against the people have reached historic proportions during the last three administrations in particular, and the time has come for We the People to rise up and reclaim control of our nation. If not, the government will control us and this will mark the end of individual liberties. The American people can thus use these class actions to 'man the barricades of freedom' against the establishment government despots and their corporate enablers who seek to enslave them through coercive abuses of their privacy. This Orwellian power grab can only be intended to blackmail the masses into submission in order that these modern day greedy tyrants achieve their corrupt ends.

His lawsuit also named Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Skype, YouTube, Apple, PalTalk, AOL, and Yahoo! for allegedly giving customer data to the NSA voluntarily.

This is Mr. Klayman's second lawsuit related to NSA privacy issues. He also filed a class action lawsuit against Verizon for giving the NSA customer activity records under a court order.

Reports claiming Apple, along with several other companies, where giving the NSA direct access to their servers surfaced earlier in June. Apple spokesperson Steve Dowling denied Apple was participating in the PRISM program, stating, "We have never heard of PRISM. We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer data must get a court order."

Google and Facebook issued denials, too. Google said in part, "From time to time, people allege that we have created a government 'back door' into our systems, but Google does not have a 'back door' for the government to access private user data."

Mr. Klayman, who founded Judicial Watch and Freedom Watch, filed his class action lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Washington DC. Apple hasn't commented on the lawsuit.

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Comments

furbies

Does Mr. Larry Klayman also wear a tin foil hat ?

Lee Dronick

How was he harmed?

Lee Dronick

Do a web search on this guy.

skipaq

I am not at all happy with the data collection going on by the NSA. One more government agency running amuck like the DOJ and IRS does not instill confidence that this administration has a clue about what is going on.

I am not really comfortable with the method used by the whistleblower nor his truthfulness. It just seems like no one is in charge.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

The thing I love about Apple is how tone-deaf they are to the entire narrative. Did anyone else catch the announcement Monday of a service that would tell you what apps people in close proximity to you are using? Actually, it is a great idea and would probably be a fun service to use. But put Apple in the middle of it, and it’s a guaranteed privacy disaster, as Apple is too big to say no to the government.

bbbo

This will go nowhere.
You can file a lawsuit against a ham sandwich. Just pay the filing fee.

mhikl

‘man the barricades of freedom’, ‘establishment government despots’, ‘their corporate enablers’,  ‘enslave them through coercive abuses of their privacy’, ‘Orwellian power grab’, ‘blackmail the masses into submission’, ‘greedy tyrants achieve their corrupt ends’.

Orwell’s book, 1984, is even more poignant today than when it was published in 1948, three years after the end of the Second World War. Orwell obviously understood the path government could take and government has gained exponential cunning in the sixty years since that war; yet as for the tools of the common man against tyranny, not so much has changed, few new tools have arisen, and the power of many old ones has suffered decay from nefarious assaults under the guise of the common good. The Internet may or may not assist against the assault. Only time will tell how the different intentioned agendas for its use fare. Just as the actions of great persons of their times–such as Copernicus, Galileo and Semmelweis–had to wait just measure by the times that followed, only the understanding of future generations will have the understanding of hindsight.

We must never sit casually assured in the sense that a government could never incarnate the Orwellian nightmare. It has happened today in North Korea where ignorance is bliss. North Korea is not alone. History has shown that some of the most highly civilized peoples have committed the gravest crimes against their own citizens and nation, when a few years earlier or later the same would come to find such actions appalling. Taken for-granted, freedoms we hold dear may not be so dearly held by the generations to come. Ignorance can provide a true state of perceived bliss.

Messrs. Klayman and Snowden will be judged by history, and history is eventually the gravest judge; unless Orwell’s nightmare is made true and the evidence is eviscerated.

Lancashire-Witch

The EU doesn’t seem pleased about all this-
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-22872884

Lee Dronick

Don’t think for a moment that the USA is alone in this activity.

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-Issues/2013/0612/Snooping-states-NSA-not-alone-in-spying-on-citizens?pt=tAD2SCT8P7

iJack

What’s wrong with you guys? A class-action suit is a legitimate way to find out exactly what’s going on, and Americans have been using it for decades. You’re not paying for it, so why the bitching and sniping? You don’t seem to mind the government (and I use that term loosely) doing exactly what it wants.

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