QuickBooks 2012 to Focus on Users, not Windows Parity

| Product News

Intuit unveiled QuickBooks 2012 for the Mac on Wednesday with plans to ship the business accounting app later this month. Instead of working to bring the Mac version’s features in line with the Windows version, Intuit instead decided to focus on what it sees as core needs of its users.

QuickBooks 2012QuickBooks 2012 targets user needs, not Windows feature parity

“Most of our [Mac] users are service businesses and small businesses,” QuickBooks for Mac group product manager Pranay Kapadia told The Mac Observer. “So we’re giving them the features they’ve been telling us they want.”

The new version of QuickBooks includes a new setup assistant and a setup service for new users where a real person walks them through setting up accounts.

The Interface has beed redesigned, too, for easier and quicker access to common tasks. The new version also includes a new Customer Info panel that shows important details at a glance such as outstanding bills, recent payments and recent orders.

Intuit redesigned the Invoicing system so users can finally preview invoices in-app, and added progressive invoicing that tracks partial payments and handles incremental billing.

A new app-wide search system that includes filters and support for saving customer searches.

QuickBooks Customer HistoryQuickBooks 2012 shows customer activity in a single view

Intuit also worked to improve efficiency by adding contextual menu support, one-button saving, trackpad gesture support for navigation, and by cutting down on the number of mouse clicks needed to perform common tasks.

The 2012 version improved electronic bank record support by adding the ability to rename imported bank activity entries, and adding support for auto-linking specific entries to clients or other accounts by name.

According to Mr. Kapadia, QuickBooks 2012 includes over 50 new features and enhancements, many of which aren’t available in the Windows version of the application.

QuickBooks 2012 will ship on September 26 and will be priced at US$229.95 for a single user license, $439.95 for two users, and $599.95 for three users. Additional user licenses will cost $209.95 each.

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Comments

jfbiii

But it?s a little too late she?s a little too gone
She?s a little too right I?m a little too wrong
Now would be a good time to change

davebarnes

@jfbiii,
I wanted to flag your comment as APPROPRIATE, but I could not.
Too late is correct.

skipaq

This company just is not into it as far as Mac customers. Both their business and personal products are sub par compared to others.

The logic for this new product is based on self fulfilled circular thinking. Put out crippled Mac business software which leads to adoption by mostly some “service businesses and small businesses” which tells us to put out more crippled Mac business software.

I owned a small business for 16 years up until 2008. We had from 6 to 13 employees. Quickbooks was not even an option as it lacked many things other programs offered. We used CheckMark’s MultiLedger and Payroll.

brett_x

It does seem a little too late, or a lot even. But there aren’t any real alternatives to people who run a business. Or are there?

geoduck

Yesterday I saw an ad for Quicken Loans.

My immediate reaction was “So that’s what they’ve been doing rather than fixing their @*!&$$?{ software.”

lhallberg

based on self fulfilled circular thinking

Exactly.

Most of our [Mac] users are service businesses and small businesses…

Maybe because your Mac product sucks?

we?re giving them the features they?ve been telling us they want…

Really?  ... Really? How about what the potential customer wants?

Idgets!

William Lynes

Hello,
I wanted to clarify some of the data cited in this article to address this comment:

The logic for this new product is based on self fulfilled circular thinking. Put out crippled Mac business software which leads to adoption by mostly some ?service businesses and small businesses? which tells us to put out more crippled Mac business software.

The piece of data we cite showing that Mac small businesses are much more likely to sell services exclusively compared to Windows based business is looking at Mac small businesses overall, not just QuickBooks for Mac users. Similarly, although the data we shared on number of employees was based on our current user base, we have survey data for the overall Mac small business population showing significantly more sole proprietors and more home-based businesses (loosely correlated with business size).

I think that clearly supports our case that focusing on the needs of a majority of Mac small businesses out there will result in a product that is different from the Windows versions.

Best,
Will
Product Manager
QuickBooks for Mac

William Lynes

Hello,
I wanted to clarify some of the data cited in this article to address this comment:

The logic for this new product is based on self fulfilled circular thinking. Put out crippled Mac business software which leads to adoption by mostly some ?service businesses and small businesses? which tells us to put out more crippled Mac business software.

The piece of data we cite showing that Mac small businesses are much more likely to sell services exclusively compared to Windows based business is looking at Mac small businesses overall, not just QuickBooks for Mac users. Similarly, although the data we shared on number of employees was based on our current user base, we have survey data for the overall Mac small business population showing significantly more sole proprietors and more home-based businesses (loosely correlated with business size).

Although we’ve never promised to be everything to everybody, we’re working hard to improve QuickBooks for Mac to better meet the needs of a majority Mac small businesses.

Best,
Will
Product Manager
QuickBooks for Mac

skipaq

William, I appreciate your response and acknowledge the data you are using is based on a broader sample than my post suggested. However, I do not believe that changes much about the cause of this data.

At the time, I made decision to stick with Mac OS in my business. Your product did not meet my needs on that platform. The number of small business owners who used Windows in my market by far surpassed Mac OS. Many of these did so because Quickbooks on Windows did meet many of those needs. My accountant used Quickbooks on Windows. Probably still does.

I don’t know all the factors that went into Intuit’s decision to not keep their Mac offerings up with their Windows offerings. I do know this much. That decision has contributed to the current state of Intuit product on the Mac platform. This could have been different. More important for your consideration is the future of the Mac platform and Intuit’s place on it.

I would strongly suggest that you and the rest of Intuit’s management team look to expand that presence rather than cater to the portion of the Mac OS market that you have. That goes for the Quicken division as well.

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