RIM Posts Video Comparing Playbook & iPad Browser

| Analysis

Research In Motion has posted a video on YouTube comparing the iPad’s Web browser to the browser on RIM’s not-yet-released BlackBerry Playbook tablet. The company shows both devices side by side and has them visit the same Web sites to compare rendering speed and accuracy. Not surprisingly, the examples used show Playbook as the clear winner in both measures.

As the Playbook isn’t yet shipping, it’s impossible to do independent tests, and Apple fans will no doubt point out that RIM is comparing a not-yet-shipping device to a device that has been on the market for seven months. By the time Playbook does ship, a 2nd generation iPad is likely to be on the way or perhaps even already released.

On the other hand, supporters of RIM (or anything that’s not Apple) are likely to counter that even if a 2nd generation iPad is faster, it still won’t support Flash, one of the cornerstones of RIM’s defense of its still-not-available Playbook. RIM’s CEO has worked hard to make the case that Flash is the shiznit, and the most important part of offering a proper Web browsing experience.

In addition, Apple fans will no doubt immediately see how iPads’s larger display looks better and is easier to type on (a subjective issue, in any event), whilst Playbook fans (and Apple haters) will see that the smaller 7” form factor makes Playbook more portable.

The reality is that any time a company like Apple, RIM, Google, Microsoft (etc.) shows us comparisons like these, they have been carefully screened ahead of time to demonstrate the results that company wishes us to see.

In the end, rendering speeds aren’t going to sell devices (no matter who’s in front at any particular point in time), and the market has already ruled that the lack of Flash support isn’t keeping people from buying iPhones, iPads, and iPod touches; which means that this video’s appeal is mainly to nerds like us (and you) who want to argue about the importance of esoteric crap that the rest of the world doesn’t care about.

With that ostentatious introduction, we present RIM’s video:

Comments

dlstarr7

Notice the iPads screen is more brilliant and shows better blacks.

But I want to see a typing test between the two keyboards.  The iPads larger keyboard would kick the Playbooks ass.

other side

The iPads larger keyboard would kick the Playbooks ass.

Of course it would.  Apples and oranges (and pun intended).

The Playbook is more of a competitor of the iPhone, not the iPad.

Kevin

Wow, a product so new its not shipping yet has a slight speed advantage over a product introduced 8 months earlier, I’m shocked.

aardman

The most glaring difference is that the iPad’s screen is far larger and thus better.  I think this video has the opposite effect from what was intended.  Major backfire for RIM.

John Molloy

Notice they didn’t say how long the battery life is? It’s pretty easy to take a more recent processor and over-clock it for bragging rights. Especially in a video. Much harder to deliver the goods in the flesh. Notice that they didn’t show it scrolling pages or zooming on the text. Which are issues on devices other that the iPad, especially running Flash.

There were some other videos later this week - one on engadget where they managed to corner Jim Balsillie and he showed off his demo unit in a hotel corridor. Still no mention of battery life though.

This seems like some kind of spoiler campaign from RIM, taking a page out of Microsoft’s old playbook and are attempting to get the public to not purchase a product they can actually walk into a store and buy by waving a carrot of vaporware in front of them. This is a slow media campaign from RIMM which is meant to work as a spoiler against all iOS devices. I think we’ve all had enough experience with people telling us to ignore what we can buy and wait long enough for them to come up with a solution…

On another topic altogether. Facetime. Yay. We now actually have videophones. One down. Now where’s that flying car I was promised?

geoduck

RIM?s CEO has worked hard to make the case that Flash is the shiznit,

Shiznit? Really?
Somehow I rather doubt he’s using that exact terminology. It is boring, staid, corporate, old RIM after all.

studentx

My iPad4 is twice as thin with 48 battery life and quad-core processor. Unfortunately you can’t buy it yet.

studentx

Shiznit? Really?
Somehow I rather doubt he?s using that exact terminology. It is boring, staid, corporate, old RIM after all.

I think he meant “hot-diggitty-dog” or “Shazam”

ibuck

Is it just me, or is he hitting the enter button on the Playbook before the iPad in every instance? I don’t know if that affects the performance on their wifi network.

That said, if Playbook is actually faster, and has comparable battery life, it could be a good thing. Sometimes Apple needs to be pushed to make their products better.

I wonder which will hit the market sooner: Playbook or iPad 2.0?

geoduck

I wonder which will hit the market sooner: Playbook or iPad 2.0?

I know which one will hit MY HOUSE first.

wab95

Wow, a product so new its not shipping yet has a slight speed advantage over a product introduced 8 months earlier, I?m shocked.

Nice pick up, Kevin.

Comparing a new device to what Apple has already delivered means that RIM is in catch-up mode. They have no idea what iPad 2.0 will be like, other than substantially better than 1.0; they just hope you haven’t thought that far ahead.

This seems like some kind of spoiler campaign from RIM, taking a page out of Microsoft?s old playbook and are attempting to get the public to not purchase a product they can actually walk into a store and buy by waving a carrot of vaporware

Agreed. And the backfire can be even worse when the delivered product falls far short of Apple’s next big thing, which will come out during the lifetime of Playbook 1.0. MS’s Vista should remain an object lesson for marketing departments everywhere about the dangers of peddling vapourware in the face of products on the shelf. Hell hath no fury like expectations scorned.

As much flak as Apple attracts from being silent on products in development, or making only cryptic references to products that may or may not be in production (recall Tim Cook’s comments regarding netbooks prior to the iPad release), their approach has the merit of dashing only such expectations as the public and pundits themselves have created.

Log-in to comment