Skyfire for iPhone Too Popular for App Store

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Skyfire, the app that lets iPhone users watch Flash videos, proved so popular when it launched on Thursday that the developers had to pull it from the store after only five hours. The company pulled Skyfire because their Flash to HTML5 conversion servers were overwhelmed with the volume from users that had just downloaded the app.

“The user experience was performing well for the first few hours, but as the surge continued, the peak load on our servers and bandwidth caused the video experience to degrade,” the company said.

Skyfire for the iPhone

Skyfire lets iPhone users view Flash video by intercepting the Flash content they want to watch, re-encoding it for HTML5, then sending it on to the viewer. Once the Skyfire Labs servers couldn’t keep up with user demand, the company pulled their app from Apple’s App Store.

For users that didn’t get a chance to download Skyfire before it was pulled, you’ll get your chance later. “We are working really hard to increase capacity and will be accepting new purchases from the App Store as soon as we can support it,” the company said.

Skyfire is priced at US$2.99 and will eventually be available at the App Store again.

Comments

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Hilarious. Apple customers want to see Flash video on the web so badly, they’ll pay for an expensive server-side kludge because Apple won’t let their devices just transcode the video.

Lee Dronick

I wonder what was the capacity of their servers.

MacKeeper_fan_Mod

Oh, shit. What did they inserted in this program? Maybe when you start it, several hot girls come out your monitor or you get a pack of beer? Ok, I should know the truth, so I have to get this program and see for myself, what’s wrong.

John Dingler, artist,

10 hrs. of battery charge is down to 5, eh? *S*

Lee Dronick

Hey Jeff, about the headline. It reads like downloading Skyfire was a problem for the App Store. Maybe something along the line of

Flash Slows Skyfire’s Servers Down to a Crawl

Nemo

What’s hilarious is that Skyfire transcodes Flash to HTML 5 technologies.  Of course, that will only be necessary until websites have finished their transition to HTML5, which is proceeding apace.

Nemo

And here’s another of the legion of online evidence supporting Apple’s decision to eliminate Flash.  Apparently, Flash reduces the duration of battery life on the new 11” MacBook Air by 33%, from 6:02 hrs. to 4 hrs, and that is on full fledged computer with huge batteries, so you know what Flash does to battery life on mobile devices, even Apple’s mobile devices, which have greater battery life than Android anything.  See http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews/2010/11/the-future-of-notebooks-ars-reviews-the-11-macbook-air.ars/3

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Nemo, benchmarks without reproducible steps, data, and context are worthless. In fact, they are worse than that, because someone like you who has no ability to dive in and figure out what they did and comparatively what it means just turn around and trumpet it as “evidence”. They do, however, provide a little bit of context in the next paragraph:

If you play lots of video, games, or run CPU-intensive tasks like video encoding, expect to have to find a power outlet well within four hours.

To someone who knows a little bit about CPU-intensive tasks like graphics and animation as well as the APIs Apple has (or has not provided) to offload animation onto more efficient graphics hardware, the whole thing reads like “yeah, no shit”.

Nemo

If you play lots of video, games, or run CPU-intensive tasks like video encoding, expect to have to find a power outlet well within four hours.

That was expect four hours without Flash when doing CPU intensive tasks.  Add Flash to those tasks, and you take away 33% of your four hours for whopping 2.68 hours.  For me, that means Flash would have lopped off the last ten or fifteen minutes of my recent viewing of Hamlet on a MacBook Air.  Precious, the denouement of Hamlet would have had to wait until I was on the ground and could get to a wall socket.

Hamlet or Flash?  To Flash or not to Flash?  That is the question.  And the answer is to end that sea of trouble that is Flash by banishing it to that country from whose bourn no traveler returns.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

That was expect four hours without Flash when doing CPU intensive tasks.? Add Flash to those tasks, and you take away 33% of your four hours for whopping 2.68 hours.?

Lawyer math, complete with figures rounded to 1/100 hour. Nuff said.

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