Steve Jobs in E-mail to Fan: “Life is Fragile”

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In another e-mail reply from Steve Jobs to a fan, the Apple CEO offered a simple comment: “Life is fragile.” BusinessInsider published the exchange between Mr. Jobs and a young man named James who was thanking him for his recent efforts to promote an organ donation-related bill in California.

James told Mr. Jobs that he had lost his girlfriend in April of 2008 to melanoma, a cancer that “spread rapidly to her liver.” She died two days after this was discovered, making organ donations something important to the young man. James and his girlfriend both being from Cupertino, he called Mr. Jobs a “home town hero,” and he thanked him for his work in promoting organ donations.

Mr. Jobs sent him a reply of:

Your most welcome, James. I’m sorry about your girlfriend. Life is fragile.

Steve

Sent from my iPad

Steve Jobs has been replying to a number of e-mails from fans and Apple customers, many of which have made news in recent months, in part because they represented a change in behavior from Mr. Jobs, who was not known for directly replying to many such e-mails.

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Comments

Khaled

Well said

woode

Indeed.

Terrin

I wonder if the so called Apple fans ask Mr. Jobs if he minds that they post his personal replies.

I think it lame people share with the world what essentially seem like private replies.

Al

What’s sad to me is that the chief CEO of a MAJOR corporation, who has given us fantastic products, doesn’t know correct grammar, as in “Your most welcome?” (should be You’re).

Chris Miller

To pick up on Al’s comment:

So many people get homonyms confused these days that I’m rather nonplussed that spell check utilities haven’t yet been fine tuned to detect these potential confusables (a short list, when you think about it) and automatically provide a pop-up with the alternatives plus a short reminder of what each means.

E.g.:

its = of it
it’s = it is

your = of you
you’re = you are

there =  that place
their = of them
they’re =  they are

...and so on.

Terrin

When you have a billion dollars in the bank, you really don’t have to worry about grammar. When other CEOs were off to school learning grammar, Jobs was traveling to India, starting Apple Computers, Pixar, and Next. I’ll give Jobs a pass.

What?s sad to me is that the chief CEO of a MAJOR corporation, who has given us fantastic products, doesn?t know correct grammar, as in ?Your most welcome?? (should be You?re).

mrmwebmax

+

What?s sad to me is that the chief CEO of a MAJOR corporation, who has given us fantastic products, doesn?t know correct grammar, as in ?Your most welcome?? (should be You?re).

What’s most pathetic to me is that:

1) A beloved person is dead
2) Steve Jobs sent a heartfelt reply
...and
3) You find fun in pointing out grammar errors.

How many emaisl do you think Steve must answer now? I’d say the sentiment behind this one was far more important than the grammar. Grow up.

timhood

I’ve got to think that Mr. Jobs gets literally tens of thousands of e-mails per day. It’s well known (and expected) that he has assistants filter through the e-mail and only forward on the e-mail he truly must see.

It would be reasonable to expect that he has also given his assistants authority to reply in his name to certain e-mails (those which are not of corporate business or otherwise require his attention). In other words, e-mails such as these. This happens with other CEO’s, congressmen, senators and the president. Why would we think this is any different? Think about how much time it would take just to read any number of e-mails each day, let alone pick and choose which to reply.

While this particular e-mail may be more worthy of a reply than most, other replies that have been made public were to less notable e-mails. I suggest that it is one of his assistants who lacks the grammar skills.

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