Steve Jobs & iPad Make The Cover of This Week’s Time Magazine

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Steve Jobs and the iPad are the subject of the cover story of this week’s Time magazine, including a remarkable photo of Mr. Jobs looking healthier than he’s appeared in the last couple of years. The story itself is part look at author Stephen Fry’s own obsession with Apple products, part mini-history of Apple, part look at Apple’s design philosophy, and part look at the iPad itself.

One passage in particular offers a poignant look at Mr. Jobs that will be nodded at by Apple enthusiats and derided and dismissed by the Apple haters in the world.

“I have met five British Prime Ministers, two American Presidents, Nelson Mandela, Michael Jackson and the Queen,” wrote Mr. Fry. “My hour with Steve Jobs certainly made me more nervous than any of those encounters. I know what you are thinking, but it’s the truth. I do believe Jobs to be a truly great figure, one of the small group of innovators who have changed the world. He exists somewhere between showman, perfectionist overseer, visionary, enthusiast and opportunist, and his insistence upon design, detail, finish, quality, ease of use and reliability are a huge part of Apple’s success.”

You can find this week’s Time magazine on the newstand or on the App Store (US$4.99 for the app).

Time Magazine Time Magazine Cover

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Comments

fortuna1

$5 for one issue?
This is not going to fly…

Thomas

There’s no doubting the superior technology of apple products, and no competitor can beat the cool factor of apple’s design. The only problem I have with Apple products - and it’s a big problem for me - is how incredibly ungreen they are. With built-in obsolescence ensuring we all replace our apple products every two or three years, the sealed design of the ipod so batteries can’t be replaced, and that’s before we start looking at manufacturing materials and processes. It’s a tech-industry problem for sure, but as market leaders, I’d like to see Apple leading on this front too. In 50 years, virtually every apple component, every single item, will still exist somewhere, as discarded leftovers in basements and offices or in a landfill somewhere. Frightening thought. So it’s ironic that Steve Jobs is on the Time cover below a Special Environment issue banner.

Bosco (Brad Hutchings)

Thomas, you almost make me want to buy an iPad. Almost.

Lee Dronick

The sealed design of the ipod so batteries can?t be replaced,

The batteries can be replaced. Just not so easily by the garden variety user.

geoduck

With built-in obsolescence ensuring we all replace our apple products every two or three years, the sealed design of the ipod so batteries can?t be replaced, and that?s before we start looking at manufacturing materials and processes.

Say what?
Two or Three years? I tend to keep my macs, desktop or ‘books for 5-6 years and then hand them off to someone else or sell them. Their longevity is far greener than typical winbooks that are ready to be trashed after 3 and desktops that are labored to keep up after 4-5 years of Win Updates.
As far as the iPod, I’ve always found that argument rather mysterious. We have a couple that are like 5 and 7 years old and the batteries are going strong. I simply don’t know what others are doing with their iPods to wear out the battery. I’ve not had one fail. Heck I WISH one would die. I’d like to buy an iPod Touch but can’t justify it as long as we have 2 units that are running strong. I’m not trying to be snide on this. I just haven’t had one that required replacing.

dhp

@Thomas,

Just a couple of years ago you would have had a great point, but Apple has come a long way. As just one example, MacBooks now use a fully recyclable one-piece aluminum frame. Does anyone else do that?

http://www.apple.com/environment/

geoduck

Correction:
I should have said the iPods were 4 and 5 years old. Math failed on me

cb50dc

The only problem I have with Apple products - and it?s a big problem for me - is how incredibly ungreen they are

Let me add a little documentation for dhp’s point. Since roughly 2006-07, Greenpeace has acknowledged and welcomed Apple’s substantial leadership in some major environmental issues.

http://www.greenpeace.org/international/news/tasty-apple-news-020507

and from just two days ago at
http://weblog.greenpeace.org/makingwaves/
where the second story says “...several big companies like HP, Nokia and Apple have proven its feasible [to ban toxic PVC and BFRs… it was perfectly feasible to substitute these materials…]

“It remains to be seen if others such as Dell, Samsung and others will have the integrity to follow their lead… these companies that have taken a leadership commitment to voluntarily eliminate these toxic substances will bear the lions share of the costs of new alternatives and face more problems in getting their supply chains to produce enough of them. Companies who haven?t been progressive will get a free ride to continue using toxic chemicals.”

Worth considering in the big picture.

thomas

Thanks for the links cbsofla. The bigger picture is e-waste and I think it should be a basis for competition between the big players. There will always be room for improvement, and being a mac fan, it’s good to see Apple competing and leading here.

cb50dc

being a mac fan, it?s good to see Apple competing and leading here

Likewise. Here’s hoping they keep at it in other ways as well.

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