Survey Finds iPad Dominates Enterprise & Consumer Tablets

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The iPad continues to utterly dominate demand for tablets in both the consumer and enterprise markets, according to a new survey from Changewave Research. A key reason for this dominance is the fact that customer satisfaction for iPad owners is far higher than it is for those few people who own non-iPad tablets.

The Suits (with Pocket Protectors)

Changewave conducted a survey among 1,618 corporate IT buyers between August 10th and August 29th that found 80% of those planning on buying tablets for employees were intending to make them iPads. This is unchanged from the previous survey.

The chart below shows Apple’s utter dominance of planned tablet purchases. Note, also, that Samsung was the only company to show a gain, from 6% of future purchases to 7%, while Dell, Motorola, and Research In Motion’s BlackBerry PlayBook all took hits. The firm also said that 10% planned on buying HP TouchPads before that device was canceled. That would have been enough for a distant #2.

Changewave Chart

Source: Changewave Research

Consumers

In the consumer space, the picture if even uglier if you’re trying to sell a tablet not called “iPad.” Changewave surveyed 2,969 consumers during August and found an even larger percentage of those planning on buying a tablet intending to make it an iPad.

“Even as competitors flood the market with their own tablets Apple continues to dominate,” the firm wrote in its report, “with 85% of planned buyers saying they’ll get an iPad.”

The figure below shows that Galaxy Tab demand is #2 with just 4% planning on buying themselves a Samsung tablet. RIM’s BlackBerry PlayBook was #3 at 2%, and Motorola’s Xoom a proud #4 with 1%.

Changewave Chart

Source: Changewave Research

Turns Out I Can Get Satisfaction (with an iPad)

“A key reason for the iPad lead is found in its customer satisfaction rating,” the company wrote. “70% of consumer iPad owners say they’re Very Satisfied with their tablet device. That dwarfs the Very Satisfied rating of all of the other manufacturers combined (42%).”

You can see those results in the figure below. The iPad has consistently rated very high in customer satisfaction surveys since its release, including past Changewave surveys.

Changewave Chart

Source: Changewave Research

The Steve Jobs Inoculation Effect

Another interesting data point from the firm’s report is what Changewave referred to as the Steve Jobs inoculation effect. The company asked consumers if the resignation of Apple CEO Steve Jobs made them less likely to buy Apple products in the future. 4% of those surveyed said yes to this question.

If you go back to June of 2008, however, when Steve Jobs took his first medical leave of absence, 18% of those surveyed said that his departure would make them less likely to buy Apple products in the future. That represents a 14 point decrease in the three years since that time. In fact, 1% of respondents now said that they were more likely buy a product from Apple, with another 6% saying “Don’t Know.”

“The results suggest that [Steve] Jobs’s previous absences have had an ‘inoculating’ effect that over time has allayed consumer concerns on whether the company could operate at the same level without Steve Jobs at the helm,” the company wrote.

The chart below traces the steady downward direction of any concern over buying products from an Apple without Steve Jobs as CEO.

Changewave Chart

Source: Changewave Research

Comments

RonMacGuy

Nice article, Bryan. Thank you.

wab95

When one looks at figures like this, one can understand why a company with the history of HP decided to get out of the business (at least tablets, one can still argue about their PCs).

I maintain my earlier argument that non-Apple OEMs are not competing against a tablet, but a new computing paradigm, which is why, in the absence of being able to offer a compelling or even competitive alternative in the latter, their tablets compete so poorly.

The inoculation effect is good to see, and bespeaks a rational rather than purely emotional (i.e. fear) response.

BTW Bryan, these graphs lack your usual artistic flair, but good stuff all the same.

geoduck

Yes, quite well done.

What I find most interesting is the collapse of RIM. In May, just after the PlayBook was released and it was the hot new thing, 8% said they were looking at the PlayBook. Now after three or four months of actually seeing the PlayBook the number dropped to 3%, the lowest on the chart. just .375 of the earlier survey.

The more users see the PlayBook the less they want it.

Paul Goodwin

That article is full of “wows”. That’s a pretty stunning set of data with substantial sample sizes. My wife has one and that device is pretty amazing. The story is even more lopsided than I’d imagined. Good article Bryan

Lee Dronick

My wife has one and that device is pretty amazing.

My wife also has one, until Friday it was mine, she commandeered it to use for her college studies. Oh well what can you do, her studies are more important right now. I can still borrow it and use the Star Walk app when sitting out back in evenings.

Yes they are amazing devices and I very much miss it.

geoduck

Yes they are amazing devices and I very much miss it.

They are impressive.
How impressive? Well, my plan was to replace my three year old MacBook with a MacBook Pro this fall. This summer we got one for my wife and now I’m not so sure. I might wait and get an iPad 3 and a Mini. I find that the iPad takes care of pretty much everything I need when I’m on the road. The MIni would be for the times when I need a fixed computer big screen, and OS-X.

Decisions decisions.

Lee Dronick

How impressive? Well, my plan was to replace my three year old MacBook with a MacBook Pro this fall. This summer we got one for my wife and now I?m not so sure. I might wait and get an iPad 3 and a Mini. I find that the iPad takes care of pretty much everything I need when I?m on the road. The MIni would be for the times when I need a fixed computer big screen, and OS-X.

Thus far my wife is primarily using the iPad2 to do research on the web and for jotting notes. For writing she is still using her MacBook Pro and Word. Email too.

I think that the iPad is not so well suited for a lot of writing unless you use it with a wireless keyboard. At that point I would think that a MacBook Air would be a better choice.

Yes decisions, decisions.

Paul Goodwin

Yes. I have the iPad-MacBook Air quandary too. But I have a 1 yr old iMac so even though I kinda drool over that laptop, I’ll go for the iPad.  The wife’s MacBook Pro is a 2006 core 2 duo that can’t run the new OS so she’ll probably get the MacBook Air. She always has to be ahead of me in technology. But she does a fair amount of movie editing which complicates things a little. A new MacBook Pro would be a better choice for that. I’m going to push her for an early Christmas present (iPad) if the iPad 3 comes out this fall. Doing this babbling on this iPhone is a little painful after a while.

Haha. “Decisions. Decisions.”. iPad and Mini-good. iPad and MacBook Pro-good. iPad and MacBook Air-good. iPad and iMac-good.  I found a little corrosion on my 10 year old car-I should get it fixed. Nah! I need an iPad

Technology Coast Consulting

Hello Bryan,
Thank you for the article and data.  I think I can lend some insights as to why the iPad is preferred among enterprise users.  In a recent study, we found that healthcare workers were a leading category of iPad purchasers. Physicians and healthcare workers preferred the iPad because of the UI?s intuitive nature, which shortened the mobile app learning curve.  Mobile healthcare workers could also navigate the apps easily so they felt more productive, efficient and able to focus on their patient rather than on the technology.  I’ll look forward to your future coverage. 
Amy von Kaenel, Technology Coast Consulting

Chris

Hmm has anyone noticed that the graphs don’t add up?

The “previous survey” results in the first graph add up to 110% and the second graph only adds up to 92% ( although maybe this one can be explained by people who didn’t respond at all..)

wab95

Hmm has anyone noticed that the graphs don?t add up

Presumably, Chris, you meant the top chart. The simplest interpretation is that this is not the complete set of options. Rather than having a spike at 8%, making it look like a contender on the chart, the author chose to leave only the top manufactures for effect. Artistic licence.

Bryan Chaffin

My understanding is that buying more than one type of tablet was an option.

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