T-Mobile: Our Q4 Stunk Because We Don’t Have the iPhone

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T-Mobile USA on Wednesday reported US$4.57 billion in revenue during 4Q11, down from $4.69 billion in 4Q10 as it shed 526,000 net customers. “Not carrying the iPhone led to a significant increase in contract deactivations in the fourth quarter of 2011,” company CEO Philipp Humm said in a press release. T-Mobile’s net customer losses were 23,000 in the year-ago quarter.

T-Mobile could have been an iPhone carrier, but its proposed sale to AT&T was terminated on Dec. 20, 2011. The US Department of Justice filed a complaint to block the acquisition, saying the transaction “would substantially lessen competition for mobile wireless telecommunications services across the United States, resulting in higher prices, poorer quality services, fewer choices and fewer innovative products for the millions of American consumers who rely on mobile wireless services in their everyday lives.”

Looking ahead, T-Mobile said it’s sinking money into its 4G network and touted the availability of new Android-based smartphones and handsets. 

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Comments

Winski

Let’s look back, in the not so distant time-travel device called Google Search… THIS quarters numbers AND last quarters LOSS OF CUSTOMERS is EXACTLY the same number (close).... SO, if they stay on a trajectory like this, they’ll be OUT OF CUSTOMERS soon… HA!

Given that T-Mumble has the WORST MARKETING ORGANIZATION on Earth and the WORST CMO in the history of mankind - still, maybe that’s the strategy!!! Kill it all and start over??

These people are morons if they think Apple is going to lift a single finger to help them unless it’s to purchase their spectrum at garbage dump prices and scrap the rest…

CLUE FREE…

wab95

While anti-competitive mergers are a thing to be checked, when a company like T-Mobile is haemorrhaging customers, profits and marketshare, it is by definition, non-competitive. This trajectory, if not changed, ends in fatality.

While all is fair in a free market economy, given their cited reasons for blocking the merger, I feel this is one instance in which the US Department of Justice has failed to see the forest for the trees.

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