T-Mobile: Sidekick Owners Get Free Data, $100

| News

In an effort to ease the sting of losing its Sidekick customers' data, T-Mobile is crediting a month's worth of data service to its Sidekick users, and issuing US$100 T-Mobile gift certificates to users if their data isn't recoverable. The cell service provider recently revealed that Microsoft's Sidekick cloud servers lost all of their data, leaving many users without their contacts, calendars and other personal information.

T-Mobile said in a statement on its Web site "In the event certain customers have experienced a significant and permanent loss of personal content, T-Mobile will be sending these customers a $100 customer appreciation card. This will be in addition to the free month of data service that already went to Sidekick data customers."

Sidekick owners can use their gift cards to buy products at the T-Mobile Web site, or to pay their T-Mobile bill.

T-Mobile said the Sidekick data loss was the result of a Danger server failure. Danger, the company behind the Sidekick smartphone, is owned by Microsoft and its servers run on Microsoft's software.

The incident underscored the importance of maintaining personal data backups and not relying on a single source for storing critical information. It also served as a reminder that while the concept of cloud computing may be great, the infrastructure supporting the technology can still be fragile.

"We have made significant progress this past weekend, restoring services to virtually every customer," T-Mobile said. "Microsoft/Danger has teams of experts in place who are working around-the-clock to ensure this stability is maintained."

Presumably those are not the same experts that led to the data loss.

Sign Up for the Newsletter

Join the TMO Express Daily Newsletter to get the latest Mac headlines in your e-mail every weekday.

4 Comments

Jeff Gamet

I’m glad T-Mobile is working to make things right for Sidekick owners, but I have to wonder whether or not the Sidekick will bounce back and how much trust users will have in cloud based services.

daemon

I’d like to know just how many of those sidekick users actually knew that the data was kept in the cloud and not on their handsets. I know there wasn’t any obvious advertising about the service being cloud based.

geoduck

Up till the beginning of January I did IT support for a company that ran a customer support call centre for T-Mobile. I am so glad I’m not there. The agents are probably getting their @$$ royally chewed by the callers. A month free data plus 100 T-Mobile dollars. Sorry, but for most of the customers that will just not cut it. They’re going to be mad as hell and I’m sure that the lawyers will get involved.

RogelioQ

I bought my T-mobile in amazon, but Perez tweets about it, he said he would have to change it ‘cause it sucks.  Author Benjamin Rich decided to undertake a journey to a place he dubbed Whitopia.  In the 1970s, there was a series of events called “White Flight,” which consisted of a predominantly white set of people moved to suburbs to escape the inner cities.  The suburbs are now starting to empty, and the same group of people, typically middle class, move to smaller towns, usually more rural areas, to escape the suburbs, and these areas were dubbed Whitopia by Rich.  You can get it off Amazon in hardback for about $30, or for the Kindle for $10, less than any fax payday loan.  However, getting a Kindle to read Whitopia might run you some easy cash loans.

Log-in to comment