TMO Workspaces: Jason “aftermac”

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Welcome back to yet another edition of TMO Workspaces, a new weekly segment in which we highlight a user’s workspace, provide detailed information on equipment, and give tips on what is useful and what isn’t. Our goal is to go a bit deeper than what we’ve found elsewhere and to give both TMO staff and readers a chance to brag about their amazing setups. 

This week, we’re taking a look at the setup of TMO reader Jason (a.k.a “aftermac” on the forums).

Jason's Desk

Jason, as you can see from the pictures, feels he has a bit of a “problematic” hobby. With 84 computers from all eras of computing history, however, we here at TMO think his only problem is an overabundance of awesomeness. In fact, there’s only one expression we feel appropriately describes our feelings: 

Homer Simpsons DroolingThe Simpsons, 20th Century Fox

Jason’s desk is located just outside of his basement office where the majority of his computers are stored. It features a Power Mac G5 used primarily for storing music and photos. The Dell monitor is connected to an RCA switch, allowing him to flip between displaying the Power Mac’s output, the Apple IIe, and a VCR which serves as an RF-to-RCA adapter for his Atari 7800.

The Apple IIe is also connected to the Power Mac via a serial-to-USB adapter, allowing Jason to use Apple Disk Transfer Pro (ADTPro) to transfer floppy images to the IIe so that they can be written to a disk. ModemMGR is also used to turn the IIe into a serial terminal. 

Off to the right of the desk is Jason’s home-built MAME cabinet, while to the left are an HP Color LaserJet 2605dn, Canon CanoScan 4400F, and an Apple LaserWriter Select 360 networked with a D-Link 301P+ parallel print server.

Jason's Workbench

Inside the office, Jason’s workbench serves as the center of his computer repair side business. A recent remodel added custom shelving and storage giving him plenty of room to work on both clients’ computers as well as his own. 

On the right of the workbench is Jason’s Apple SE/30 with the IIgs ADB keyboard, his absolute favorite keyboard. The SE/30 is also connected to an ALPS ADB Glidepoint Trackpad, AppleCD 600e SCIS CD-ROM drive, and a Metrologic Barcode scanner

Jason's Shelving 1

Jason’s custom shelving helps organize and display his impressive collection of computers. “I love the look of the compact Macs sitting in a row,” he said. What’s not to love?

Jason's Shelving 2

While most of the computers are currently only stored and on display, Jason eventually wants to set up a working Mac model from each generation and connect them via FTP to his extensive collection of vintage software. For the Macs in his collection without Ethernet ports, he has a Cayman GatorBox, allowing him to route the older Macs’ LocalTalk connections to Ethernet.

Jason's Network Rack

Turning around, we see the other side of Jason’s office, with a newly installed network rack and additional storage bins. Each room in Jason’s house is wired with Cat 5e served up from a Bay Networks Baystack 450-24t 24-port managed switch. Going forward, Jason wants to use his managed network switch to separate his home network from the connections used by his repair business.

Obviously, there’s so much to Jason’s setup that we couldn’t possibly cover everything. We hope we’ve given you a good taste of his workspace, and we invite everyone with specific questions to chime in below. Thanks, Jason, for sharing your drool-worthy setup with us!

If you have a sweet setup that you want to share, send high-quality pictures and descriptions to jim@macobserver.com with the subject line “TMO Workspaces” and we’ll be glad to share your creativity with the world!

Previous TMO Workspaces:

TMO’s Dave Hamilton
TMO’s Ted Landau 

Comments

Lee Dronick

Well Jason, as my friend says what he wants for a home is a six car garage with an attached studio apartment. smile

Jamie

Crazy. smile

xmattingly

Two words: PURE AWESOMENESS!

I’m in awe of someone who could build such a functional workspace as well as a killer tribute to 30 years of personal computing history.

Aftermac

Jim, thank you for the excellent write-up! It’s on honor to show off my collection on TMO!

Well Jason, as my friend says what he wants for a home is a six car garage with an attached studio apartment.

Make that a six car garage and a computer museum with an attached studio apartment. wink

Crazy.

Two words: PURE AWESOMENESS!

I?m in awe of someone who could build such a functional workspace as well as a killer tribute to 30 years of personal computing history.

Thanks! Completing my office is the culmination of years of disorganization and chaos. :D

furbies

Holly Freaking Crap

Colour Me impressed!

That is a lot of Compact Macs…

Network all the Beige 9” Compact Macs together and you’ll get the computational power of ?

Lushbudget

There is enough here to restart computer science in the aftermath of a zombie apocalypse. Thanks for thinking of the future of the human race!

ctopher

I’m impressed with your collection of fully functional yellow sticky notes! smile

Is that an un-stickied Sun workstation stacked near the furnace? How did that get in there?

(By the way, the woodwork look great!)

Aftermac

I?m impressed with your collection of fully functional yellow sticky notes! smile

LOL! Eventually, I’d like to replace my sticky note system with the SE/30, Filemaker or simple web front-end to a mysql database, and a barcode scanner. smile

Is that an un-stickied Sun workstation stacked near the furnace? How did that get in there?

Actually, I have two Sun workstations. smile The one you can see in the picture is a Sparcstation 20. I also have a Sun Ultra 60 on the bottom shelf with the towers and AIO Mac’s, but too far to the left to be in the picture. Both of them were systems that I administered at a previous employer. I purchased them when we replaced them with Sun Fire workstations.

(By the way, the woodwork look great!)

Thanks! The shelving, workbench, and MAME cab were all built in my garage. Woodworking is another hobby I have that takes a lot of space. :D

wab95

Aftermac:

There’s more potential computing power in your home setup than in some ‘least developed countries’ I’ve visited - at least awhile back.

I should think BOINC clients (e.g. SETI at Home) would be delighted if you’d put at least half that computing power to their service.

Humblingly impressive. Many thanks for sharing.

furbies

I should think BOINC clients (e.g. SETI at Home) would be delighted if you?d put at least half that computing power to their service.

The power bill would be a shocker…..

A lot of the old hardware wasn’t energy efficient.

Aftermac

Aftermac:

There?s more potential computing power in your home setup than in some ?least developed countries? I?ve visited - at least awhile back.

I should think BOINC clients (e.g. SETI at Home) would be delighted if you?d put at least half that computing power to their service.

Humblingly impressive. Many thanks for sharing.

Thanks for the kind words! smile

The power bill would be a shocker?..

A lot of the old hardware wasn?t energy efficient.

Not to mention installing additional circuit breakers… I’m not even sure my existing electrical service could support running them all at the same time. smile

I’m not sure that SETI supports the vast majority of my systems… When you factor in 42 68k Mac’s, 3 IIgs’, Apple ][+, 3 IIe’s, Commodores 64 & SX-64, Atari’s 800XL & XEGS, and 2 IBM 5150’s… However, if a developing country ever needs to reintroduce computer science in a post-zombie-apocolyptic society… :D

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