Wacom Inkling Turns Drawings into Digital Images

| Product News

Wacom unveiled its new Inkling product on Tuesday. Inkling is a pen that captures what users are drawing without requiring special paper.

Wacom Inkling PenWacom’s new Inkling Pen

The pen and sensor combo tracks user’s movements as they draw, registers pressure changes against the paper, and converts the data into digital images. The images can be imported into applications like Adobe Photoshop for editing, and the pen includes Wacom’s own Sketch Manager application for editing images, too.

Images can be exported from Inkling as Photoshop, Illustrator, Autodesk Sketchbook, JPG, BMP, Tiff, PNG, SVG and PDF documents.

Wacom’s Inkling will be available in September and is priced at US$199.

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8 Comments Leave Your Own

FlipFriddle

This seems like a fantastic device, but at $200, I hope I can try it out somewhere before I buy.

wildcatherder

Apparently the sensor, that small rectangular box between the pen and the case, has to be clipped to the paper.  Motions are recorded relative to the sensor, not the paper.  God help you, if you bump the sensor while drawing.

BurmaYank

This seems like a fantastic device, but at $200, I hope I can try it out somewhere before I buy.

Has anyone tried/looked at the the LiveScribe digitizing/recording pen system? (or better yet, this*

Although I haven?t tried it yet, it seems to be amazingly powerful & useful (if it actually works the way it claims to), and I do plan to get this system. 

Hopefully, soon the LiveScribe system will directly interface with iOS, if it doesn?t do so already.  But, in the meantime, I expect all my LiveScribe pen?s digitized &/or OCR-transcribed handwritten notes & drawings, as well as all its stored audiovideo recordings of realtime happenings (such as a lecturer?s blackboard notes/drawings), would be uploadable to EverNote, where I could open them in my iPhone/iPad Evernote app +/or in my Mac’s Evernote app for all sorts of editings/manipulations/exportings.

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(* using pads of Livescribe dot-encoded paper (or, in order to save money, a stapled-together stack of dot-encoded paper which I had printed out before).

Tanuki

Has anyone tried/looked at the the LiveScribe digitizing/recording pen system? (or better yet, this*)?

Are those devices pressure sensitive?
Do they have software that allows you to draw in layers?
This product is for drawing, not note-taking.

BurmaYank

“This product is for drawing, not note-taking.”

On the contrary. Somehow, Tanuki, you completely didn’t grasp what their product description says about note-taking;
“Smartpens record everything you write and hear so you?ll never miss a word. Replay your meetings or lectures simply by tapping on your notes…

... Infrared camera captures everything you write and draw on dot paper…

...Record everything you hear, say and write, while linking your audio recordings to your notes. Quickly replay audio from your Livescribe paper, a computer, or a mobile device ? all with a simple tap on your handwritten notes. It’s never been easier to take notes and stay organized…

It?s easy to send your notes and audio as a pencast to destinations like Evernote?, Facebook, MyLivescribe, your mobile device or your computer using the included Livescribe Connect? Basic software.”

Listen to the demo here: http://www.livescribe.com/en-us/smartpen.  You’ll see how you misunderstood this device.

BurmaYank

Tanuki: “Are those devices pressure sensitive?”

No.  The device is an ordinary ball-point pen which writes & draws normally on ordinary paper, except:
-  that this pen also has a lens near its tip which images every mark as it is made by the ball-point on that paper, and references those marks to a matrix of dots pre-printed on that paper for OCR and other translations of that visually-scanned data into text, mapping & graphic imaging information.
- that it also has a built-in microphone to connect simultaneously-made mp3-recordings to those scanned & mapped ball-point writing/drawings
- that it also has a built-in microcomputer with huge RAM to locally process all that data into objects, text, soundbites and other forms of information, for coordinating the replaying with the identifying of the original data-markings on the paper map, and for wirelessly sharing that information with other systems for further manipulations/sharings.

“Do they have software that allows you to draw in layers?

It creates bit-images & uploads them to computer systems - that’s where image processing in layers would necessarily take place, I would think.

Terrin

I think you might not get Tanuki’s point. Artists need a drawing tool to be pressure sensitive. The Inkling has 1024 levels of pressure sensitivity. You need pressure sensitivity to draw anything worthwhile. The Inkling is geared toward people who create pictures for the purpose of creating pictures as opposed to people creating pictures as notes. 

The product you reference isn’t designed for drawing, and no it is not pressure sensitive. Further, it only works on special dot paper. It references your drawn lines to the dots on its paper.

The Inkling allows an artist to use any paper to make a drawing. Paper has difference texture, and also adds to an artists drawings.

On the contrary. Somehow, Tanuki, you completely didn?t grasp what their product description says about note-taking;

Terrin

LOL. Valid point. However, it is not meant to be clipped to the paper, but the binding in a sketch pad. That doesn’t undermine your point, but the sensor probably is going to relatively secure if clipped to a thicker service like the binding.

Apparently the sensor, that small rectangular box between the pen and the case, has to be clipped to the paper.? Motions are recorded relative to the sensor, not the paper.? God help you, if you bump the sensor while drawing.

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