Recent Articles By John Martellaro [RSS]

Twitter Goes Over to Dark Side, Decides Who You’ll Follow

2:30 PM, Dec. 30th, 2014 · John Martellaro · Editorial

Twitter forces who we follow

Some Twitter users woke up this morning to find that they were unexpectedly following @MasterCard, perhaps an implied endorsement that was unwanted.  William Shatner was the first to notice this, according to Marketing Land. This appears to be a troublesome effort by Twitter to monetize what has become, in essence, a public utility.

The Next Generation Flying Car from Aeromobil

4:15 PM, Dec. 29th, 2014 · John Martellaro · Cool Stuff Found

The future, in the 1950s, was supposed to be all about flying cars. But they didn't come to pass except for some rare, early prototypes. But thanks to Aeromobil's co-founder Štefan Klein, advanced technology may yet bring the dream to fruition. According to the website, "Mr. Klein has devoted the last twenty years into making his dream come true. It is a dream that only few people believed in—a flying car. Currently he works on prototype of AeroMobil 3.0 after he successfully tested concepts and pre-prototype." Version 3.0, shown here with wings extended, seats two, has a top speed in the air of 124 mph (200 km/h), and has a range 435 miles (700 km). The car's (ground) specs are similar to that of a small, economy car. The site's photos are phenomenal, and the prototype is said to be close to commercial availability, subject to each country's certification.

Apple Device Activation at Christmas Crushes Competition

2:30 PM, Dec. 29th, 2014 · John Martellaro · News

Device activations at Christmas

Flurry Analytics tracked device activations worldwide from December 19 to 25th and found that Apple accounted for over half. The runner-up was Samsung with 18 percent. In addition, Flurry also found that, at Christmas 2014, iPhone 6 Plus activations were cannibalizing iPads.

Report: Apple Pay is Disrupting and Transforming Mobile Payments

5:10 PM, Dec. 19th, 2014 · John Martellaro · Product News

ITG report on Apple Pay

"Apple Pay has the ability to significantly transform the mobile payment space." That's the conclusion of an ITG Investment Report published on December 19. A major finding is that Apple Pay has been responsible for one percent of all digital payment dollars. This is a "strong showing" given that Apple customers must have the latest iPhones and the limited list of merchants. John Martellaro summarizes the report.

The Unexpected Ways Apple Watch Will Crush the Competition

3:55 PM, Dec. 19th, 2014 · John Martellaro · Particle Debris

Particle Debris

Calling the Apple Watch just a cooler, better smartwatch isn't
the right way to look at this revolutionary device. Apple would hardly settle for that. Instead, the Apple Watch will so change people's lives that no other device on the wrist will do, and that will bring incredible success. John Martellaro makes his case.

Apple Pay Expansion Worldwide Will Have Vast Repercussions

5:30 PM, Dec. 18th, 2014 · John Martellaro · News

Apple Pay May expand worldwide soon

Apple Pay has been a huge success in the United States. The mobile payment purchase is supported by credit cards used for 90 percent of purchases. Now, thanks to a job posting that's been spotted, it seems Apple is ready to expand Apple Pay into Europe, the Middle East, Africa and India. The repercussions will be enormous.

How to Use a Lego Kit to Measure Planck’s Constant

6:29 PM, Dec. 15th, 2014 · John Martellaro · Cool Stuff Found

Planck's constant is one of the fundamental constants in the universe. For example, it defines the relationship between the energy of, say, a photon and its frequency. It's widely used in the mathematics of Quantum Mechanics. Recently, using just a Lego kit and some other equipment, including a laser, Leon Chao at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland, showed how to make this measurement. This is for real, and it works because the experimental technique simply requires a well crafted balance. It's all written up in the M.I.T. Technology Review. You could actually do the experiment yourself because the costs of parts is only about US$500. Very cool.