Recent Comments

RE: How to Test the Speed of Your Home Network with Iperf

@David I think you missed a step. You need to install Homebrew first, with the "ruby" command on the first page.

RE: How to Test the Speed of Your Home Network with Iperf

Thanks, @freejak - Indeed, HomeBrew requires Xcode. Usually OS X will prompt you for that if you need it when installing, but... that's not always the case. Thanks, @freejack.

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

And now, as for your tests... again I go back to the body of work that's been done. I don't mean to continually punt on this point, but the scientific consensus is that when the sampling/conversion is done properly, there is no audible difference (and the filtering and aliasing is a HUGE part of getting that right... and it's not easy). Given that you quickly found audible differences and were able to train others to hear the same, I have to assume it's in the sampling process simply based upon what all the other studies have found. Again, referring to…

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

Thanks for this, James. Good stuff, man. wink Responding in-kind, just to keep the trail here. Regarding the post two up from this, that's an interesting article. Dangerous reading for the casual reader, though, because this Tim Wescott gets far too close to *appearing* to make the argument for "stair-stepping" in digital sampling, something I think everyone knows is false, including the author (he basically says so). But he describes and diagrams it nonetheless. Was this thing peer-reviewed? If so, I blame his peers for letting him get away with this, too. wink Regardless, his final conclusion is right on…

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

@James Campbell thanks for this. I don't usually use the comments to go tit-for-tat immediately, but since this is such a fundamental part of understanding the math here, I felt I should either respond or remove your comment pending further research. I hate removing comments, so... here we are. wink The sampling theorem is just that: a theorem. Proven (in this case, by many). And, in part, the Wikipedia article you asked us to reference says, "The sampling theorem introduces the concept of a sample-rate that is sufficient for perfect fidelity for the class of bandlimited functions; no actual 'information'…

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

Playing some catch-up here. @macHobs - I understand your philosophical concern! I want it to be "better," too, and when I started down this path I was hopeful that it would be possible. Seems we developed the technology to placate our ears before we caught up with our eyes. @Paul Boutin - Sorry iTunes' process is mucking with your good work, sir. I'm definitely not an expert on this, but from my research I recall reading that Apple actually wants you to submit at 24-bit so THEY can do the full conversion. Perhaps that's part of your issue? @richardcon -…

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

@minphase - D'oh! Thanks. Correction to article made. I'm surprised I (or anyone else) didn't catch that mistake earlier. And by "confirmed many times" I was referring to the fact that others independently proved the same thing, without knowledge of Nyquist's work. That's all. Thanks for the comment. MUCH appreciated, sir!

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

@Paul Goodwin – an excellent point, and one that is often asked. In my conversations with all the audio experts I was repeatedly told that you only need 2 points to accurately recreate the signal and everything else is 100% extra and unnecessary (and, according to some, simply discarded). 1 point isn't enough because you don't know which way it goes, but two tells you everything you need to know. Perhaps one of them will comment here.

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

Great discussion, folks. I really appreciate all of you (and all of our TMO readers) for keeping everything so civil. You rock. Kudos... and thank you. smile I normally wait a bit to reply, but having watched this back-and-forth this morning I figured it was time to chime in, and then I'll leave you to it for more. smile @Enlil - This has been about a 6-week process for me, and I started with an open mind to find out if I needed to worry about 24-bit/96kHz reproduction. I talked to some people who are VERY well-respected in this field…

RE: Digital Music: Can You Hear Above 16-bit/44.1kHz?

@wchpitt your theory is based on sound logic (no pun intended) but turns out to be inaccurate. This is where Harry Nyquist's (and others') math works. You can perfectly reproduce a continuous signal with samples so long as your sample rate is at least double the maximum frequency you are using.