Recent Comments

RE: Subscription Pricing Isn't as Evil as You Think It Is

"Wow, take things personally much? I don’t really care about TE. I was just trying to provide my own analysis of the subject." It's not personal brett, it's how things have to work. You want to pay once and have that software kept up to date in terms of bug fixes and new OS support. That costs real money. The only way to make that money under your preferred model is a) charge 2-3x more so each purchase funds years of work and support. (Software support is not free either, but I assume you expect some form of it. I…

RE: Subscription Pricing Isn't as Evil as You Think It Is

"That’s fine if the new features are what you want. But the old model offers stability. Things don’t suddenly change on you on a day that you had to use the software for something important. " Except for bugs. But I guess once a piece of software is some amount of years old, the bugs give up and go home? Bug fixes require devs. Devs require money. nothing is free. "I think the biggest problem that most people have with subscriptions is that it takes the control away from the user. You will use the software in the way they…

RE: Subscription Pricing Isn't as Evil as You Think It Is

Then don't buy it. But don't complain when they leave you behind in a couple years or stop caring about updates for your old version. You're never going to pay them another dime, you're effectively an ex-customer.

RE: Subscription Pricing Isn't as Evil as You Think It Is

Except that you can pay the old way for CC, it's just not available to every customer. At the big business/enterprise level, it's available, because the dollar amounts there make sense for Adobe. Also, you're only "pushed" to new versions in the sense that you'll get annoyed by the update reminders. It won't terminate the function of the application. But, expecting any ISV to particularly care that older computers can't run a brand new feature fast, or at all, is unrealistic. "Gosh, this new feature that 80% of our customers want will make a computer made in 2010 run slow,…

RE: Subscription Pricing Isn't as Evil as You Think It Is

The other important thing that subscriptions do is they de-incentivize the "no new features in unpaid upgrades" thing. Looking at one of the biggest examples in the Mac market, Adobe, the number of updates that are released *as available* compared to the "better" model of pay once is astounding. Under the old method, you'd never get new features with free updates. Those were bug fixes only. Want a new feature? You paid the full up-front cost for the new version. And you waited 18-months to a year to get it. More features more often. You see that in Acrobat, written…

RE: Report says iPhone 7 Getting Curved Screen and Body, Bigger Display

the curved iphone is starting to turn into the Firewire Powerbook. If everyone repeats the same story for long enough, you'll eventually be close to right. except for gene munster. He's never right.

RE: It's Time For a New, Highly Secure OS from Apple That Hosts Both OS X and iOS

"Hypervisor". the word that describes the concept you are talking about is a hypervisor. It's not new. not even close. Also, the concept you're talking about isn't new. It's how the XBox One does things. However, other than some possible security benefits, (none of which does anything against the biggest unsolvable security problem, namely the human), and note: *possible*, there's no real benefit for this to the people using it.

RE: FBI Director Offers Disingenuous and Hypocritical Open Letter to Counter Apple

There are only three possibilities here: 1) The Director of the FBI literally does not know what a legal precedent is, or how they work. In other words, he is ignorant on a level that demands his immediate termination. 2) The Director of the FBI thinks the American people are so stupid that none of us know what a legal precedent is, or how they work. 3) He is gambling on 2) so that we overlook the fact that unless 1) is also true, the Director of the FBI just publicly lied to the country about how legal precedents work.

RE: Why Apple Developed the Swift Programming Language - Hint - Apple Car

If you're going to make claims about a thing, it really, really helps those claims are correct. Otherwise, it has a deleterious effect on the rest of your claims. As far as anecdotes on car reliability, okay, I had a '73 mustang which was perennially requiring tuneups and other preventative maintenance. I also had a 2000 civic which required naught but scheduled checkups and on-time fluid replacements. The '73 was far simpler to troubleshoot, which was good since I had to do it all the bloody time. Anecdote countered. My wife's previous car was a 2000 impala which was, to…

RE: Why Apple Developed the Swift Programming Language - Hint - Apple Car

John, you posted two questions, both of which deal with safer languages, and then draw a line that says Swift was created for cars because...2+2 = cheese? There's a gob of reasons for swift that have nothing to do with cars. Safer languages are a requirement *everywhere*. If a car is built, I've no doubt much of it's code will be in swift. But there is a huge, huge difference between that and your assertion, which is that the primary motivator for Swift was the car. That you have yet to show. And again, the number of lines of code…