Apple Posts Video Celebrating the Mac’s 30th Birthday

| Cool Stuff Found

Apple posted a video on YouTube celebrating the Mac's 30th anniversary. It features short segments from a variety of creative professionals, teachers, scientists, engineers, designers, and others who have embraced the Mac over the years, including some folks who took to the first Mac released in 1984. "There was a smiling face. There was a sense of humor about it. You could play with it." Truer words were ne'er spake. To that end, one of the things that I've enjoyed the most about all the 30th anniversary stuff that's been posted and discussed is being reminded of all these things that the Mac brought to computing that we have since come to take for granted.

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Comments

geoduck

I’ve enjoyed the most about all the 30th anniversary stuff that’s been posted and discussed is being reminded of all these things that the Mac brought to computing that we have since come to take for granted.

Very true. I remember an analyses, you might have even written it, years ago about the Mac’s influence on the computing industry. Would it have adopted the WYSIWYG GUI? Microsoft wasn’t going that way until they saw the Mac. Now we just about all systems, Mac, Win, Linux, actually almost all *NIX have a GUI available. Mouse? Not likely with the way IBM were pushing their little rubber eraser thingy in the keyboard. Trackpads? Maybe but I doubt it. Simple Desktop Publishing? Anyone remember before the Mac how to format text you had to enter codes in the text to tell it to start Bold or Italic, etc. I think that was in an early WordPerfect or something like that. Desktop Publishing? The Mac and LaserWriter created that. Prior you had to put it all together and run down to the print shop to get something done. How about USB? It was around but not firmly adopted until Apple dropped all the other ports on the iMac.

The list goes on and on. without Apple and the Mac we’d live in a very different computing world.

mrmwebmax

+

Simple Desktop Publishing? Anyone remember before the Mac how to format text you had to enter codes in the text to tell it to start Bold or Italic, etc. I think that was in an early WordPerfect or something like that. Desktop Publishing? The Mac and LaserWriter created that. Prior you had to put it all together and run down to the print shop to get something done.

I was a high school senior in 1982/83, and worked on the school newspaper as a layout artist. This was one year before the Macintosh, and here’s how it worked:

We had these huge wooden boards, onto which we’d tape this sort of blue-lined graph paper (I think they were called gallies). The blue was known as “non-repo” blue because it wouldn’t show on the final product. Stories were typed up then sent to a professional printer. They came back (somehow magically) typeset on thick paper that we would literally cut and paste onto the blue grid paper. Only we didn’t use paste, we used this hot wax instead. When the paper was finally layed out in this manner, one physical page at a time, the galleys would be sent to a printer, who would optically make plates from the galleys and then print the final product.

When I saw people doing actual typesetting on Macs the following year, at a Kinko Copies, I was blown away. Having started programming on a TI99/4A, the idea that a computer could create something “beyond” the computer—not a program or video game—but a typeset brochure, was a revelation I’ll never forget. That launched me into desktop publishing (using MacDraw at first!), then graphic design (first via Illustrator, then Photoshop, then 3D programs like Infini-D and later Cinema 4D), and now website design.

Yet when the Mac came out I thought it was stupid, not something for a programmer. Little did I know my entire future career was locked up in that tiny little box with the tiny 9-inch screen.

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