Did the earth move for you?

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    Posted: 26 April 2004 04:39 PM

    In California the main or best-known fault is San Andreas. According to this morning’s Dominion we’ve got a new one here, and it’s called Boo Boo.

    It’s 70 kilometres long and ends only about 50 kilometres from Wellington. Because it’s just been discovered (in its entirety), measurements are still being made, but it looks as though it’s got an annual slip rate of around eleven milimetres.

    I like the reassuring comments: [quote author=“Mark Stirling, Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences”]We could end up ... expecting a repeat time of maybe one in 50 to 100 years for a significant tsunami in Wellington harbour.

    Oh, joy.

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  • Posted: 29 April 2004 10:41 PM #1

    In CA the best known is indeed the San Andreas. There are spots along the freeways where you can actually see the plates collide.

    However, in Southern California there is always plate activity whether it is sensed or not and fault lines running everywhere. Researchers using a new controversial new method of prediction have put odds at 50/50 of a major quake by early September based on a variety of measuring tools.

         
  • Posted: 30 April 2004 12:03 AM #2

    [quote author=“DawnTreader”]Researchers using a new controversial new method of prediction have put odds at 50/50 of a major quake by early September based on a variety of measuring tools.

    Which most likely means nothing at all rolleyes

    I was born and raised in Northern California, and I’ve been through several “major” earth quakes.  None of them seemed like that big of a deal though.  Of course, where I am from it was not densly populated like central and southern California.  I’m from Humboldt County.  When I was in High School, we had the time we had 3 Earthquakes, all over 7 Points, all within 24 hours.  And then their was one Chirstmas night once, that knocked over the Christmas tree.  hehe.

    Or course, cleaning up the grocery store I worked at at the time was a big deal.  Biggest mess I’ve ever seen.


    <edit>
    Ahhh, just figured it out.  The big quake is Sunday night.  It’s called 10.5 and it’s on CBS I think.  Or was that NBC?  Not sure.
    :D
    </edit>

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    Jon

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    Posted: 30 April 2004 02:46 AM #3

    [quote author=“DawnTreader”]In CA the best known is indeed the San Andreas. There are spots along the freeways where you can actually see the plates collide.

    It sounds a bit like here - the Australian and Pacific plates abut right through the centre of Wellington. When it finally goes, it’s going to be huge.

    There’s an island in the middle of Wellington Harbour, called Miramar Peninsula. See, it used to be an island; now it’s joined to the mainland. Where it joins is the runway of Wellington International Airport. The fault runs down the centre-line of the runway. Another fault tracks along (literally - within a metre) the side of the Wellington-Hutt motorway.

    I found out why the new fault is called Boo Boo by the way. One end is near the mouth of the Boo Boo River, so called because it was discovered by a family out walking. Their little girl was so exhausted by walking so far, she burst into tears.

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    Posted: 30 April 2004 05:23 AM #4

    Oh yeah, surfin the San Andreas…

    When the ‘Quakes are up, hang on for a wicked knarly ride… 8-)

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    Posted: 30 April 2004 07:40 AM #5

    When I moved to Palm Desert, the first thing my landlord was doing when he picked me up at the bus station was give me the nickel tour.

    “And those hills are the San Andreas”  :bugeyed:

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  • Posted: 30 April 2004 08:28 AM #6

    [quote author=“KitsuneStudios”]

    “And those hills are the San Andreas”  :bugeyed:

    Yep. Someday soon those hills may be a few inches higher!

         
  • Posted: 30 April 2004 09:11 AM #7

    There’s the New Madrid fault line here by the Mississippi river.  I’ve never felt anything, but that may just mean that that when it slips, we’re all gonna die.  :wink:  There was a major quake attributed to it about 200 years ago or so, that ‘made the river flow backwards’.

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  • Posted: 30 April 2004 05:38 PM #8

    Yep. Since the commercial buildings and residences in the areas around the fault are not built to quake codes, it may be pretty messy if a big quake hits.

    Apparently the last big quake on that fault line caused church bells to ring in Boston!

         
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    Posted: 23 November 2004 05:28 PM #9

    We had a narrowish escape just the other day - a BBBBIIIIIGGGG earthquake. Fortunately it was way out to sea, quite a way from the nearest large towns, but 7.2! That’s huge. The fault bisects the whole of the South Island, and large parts of the North Island.

    http://www.geonet.org.nz/x2326087g_l.html

    I’m a good 1,100 kilometres away from where it happened, and I felt it.

    Those of us on the Pacific ring of fire are all living on borrowed time.

    Gulp.

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    Posted: 24 November 2004 10:38 AM #10

    Yikes!
    Head for the hills man and keep climbing until you are above the long white cloud!
    (would that be high enough to escape the water line of an incoming tidal wave?) :bugeyed:

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    You can save your money to spend later on retirement, but you cannot save the days of your youth.  Therefore, spend some of your money on yourself and enjoy life now!       
      thepoeticjuan

         
  • Posted: 02 December 2004 08:43 PM #11

    I remeber the Nisqually (give ya’ a quarter if you can pronounce it right) quake back in Seattle in 2000. 7.5, I believe. I grew up in LA, so I was havin’ some fuuuuunnnn that day. Nobody was killed and damage was pretty minimal.

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    Posted: 20 January 2005 10:38 AM #12

    I hate earthquakes .

    I was sitting in my caf? this morning enjoying my toasted bacon bagel and espresso when there was a bit of a shudder. Then a couple of seconds later there was a crump and the whole building shook. Before anyone had a chance to stand under the doorway it was all over.

    But no-one was happy. It was Richter 5.5, 30km deep (shallow) and 30km north-east of here. In context (and there’s little or no context with earthquakes), there have been ten this week, ranging from 3.3 to 5.5.

    My step-daughter and family are visiting from England-land. They were in bed and were all woken up. I think they were quite taken with it, because they’ve never felt one before. Those of us who, in theory, should be inured to them, are less happy.

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    Posted: 01 February 2005 05:30 PM #13

    I hate earthquakes .

    Or have I said that before?

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    Posted: 22 September 2005 04:12 PM #14

    On the way back in a taxi from Thursday Night Curry last night, we were listening to a radio programme about earthquakes in New Zealand, specifically the richter 8.2 (MM X) Wairarapa quake of 1855.

    For those not familiar with NZ, the Wairarapa is a valley/plain about 50km east from Wellington. Running parallel to the main Wellington faultline is Wairarapa line. And it’s a biggy.

    In 1855, it fractured, but worse than usual. At the coast there are regular steps or uplifts from successive quakes over the years, and the 1855 step is about 5 metres. But that’s vertical. 20 kilometres north is a horizontal movement of 18.5 metres. Yes, in old money that’s 60 feet.

    I blanched.

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  • Posted: 22 September 2005 09:32 PM #15

    Here, the earth is always moving .