Hidden OS X feature—cookie recipes

  • Posted: 19 April 2002 10:47 PM

    Look in /usr/share/emacs/20.7/etc in Mac OS X and you will find some rather interesting stuff including cookie recipes in the file COOKIES. A Linux user told me that these files were included with emacs so I checked Mac OS X and sure enough, they were there.

    Another file to check out is “JOKES”, which contains some jokes with really bad puns on the term “GNU.”

    Does anyone know if there are jokes or cookie recipes in Windows XP? 

    _________________
    David Nelson
    TMO Mac Specialist

    <font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: David Nelson on 2002-04-16 20:07 ]</font>

         
  • Posted: 16 April 2002 05:15 PM #1

    this is really a UNIX geek freebie found in emacs.  There are a lot of them in there, people like to refer to emacs as an operating system unto itself. 
    try this, at the terminal type emacs. 

    this will open up emacs (a unix text editor)

    now press option-x
    then type doctor

    now follow the instructions  

    alternatively try typeing hanoi after pressing opt-x

    ah emacs…

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  • Posted: 16 April 2002 08:40 PM #2

    On 2002-04-16 20:15, EDGar wrote:
    this is really a UNIX geek freebie found in emacs.  There are a lot of them in there, people like to refer to emacs as an operating system unto itself. 
    try this, at the terminal type emacs. 

    this will open up emacs (a unix text editor)

    now press option-x
    then type doctor

    now follow the instructions  

    alternatively try typeing hanoi after pressing opt-x

    ah emacs…

    didn’t know option could be used as the Meta key, EDGar. Thanks for the tip, though I think I’ll stick to Escape for now.

    <clucks tongue> But EDGar, EDGar, EDGar, how could you forget:

    M-x tetris (that is, option-x, type tetris)

    That little gem has kept me going many a time while doing programming assignments for classes…

    Emacs rocks. All there is to it.

    Jason

     

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  • Posted: 18 April 2002 08:43 AM #3

    On 2002-04-16 23:40, JVarner wrote:

    Emacs rocks. All there is to it.

    whew! I thought you were a VI man (or do you go both ways?...) 

    Besides, everyone’s played tetris, how many of you have played doctor?... oh, never mind. 

    meta is a little wonky.  X11 apps seem to interpret command as meta sometimes, or button 3 sometimes… emacs in the terminal does use opt. though. 

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    Posted: 18 April 2002 11:09 AM #4

    Using option-x for these doesn’t work for me. Esc-x does, through.

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    Rob

    widgets :: music :: photos :: twitter

         
  • Posted: 18 April 2002 01:57 PM #5

    I still use vi. I know, I know, but when I sat down to learn emacs, the admins for the different boxes (sun, DEC, hp) each used a different emacs with different defaults. vi had the great benefit of being consistent between the boxes.

    I worked with a guy who worked for AT&T before vi was created. He still will edit a file in ed or ex whenever some young punk fresh out of college gives him crap.

    A couple years ago, I was on another project where three of the programmers each had over 18 years of Unix experience at the time. Rather intimidating, that, when they tell you about undocumented global variables. The first time, I said “Boy, you’d think after ten years I’d know all these things.” Larry and Bonnie looked at each other, then looked at me and said “Rookie!”

     

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  • Posted: 18 April 2002 04:38 PM #6

    On 2002-04-18 11:43, EDGar wrote:

    On 2002-04-16 23:40, JVarner wrote:

    Emacs rocks. All there is to it.

    whew! I thought you were a VI man (or do you go both ways?...) 

    Besides, everyone’s played tetris, how many of you have played doctor?... oh, never mind. 

    meta is a little wonky.  X11 apps seem to interpret command as meta sometimes, or button 3 sometimes… emacs in the terminal does use opt. though. 

    Oh, I certainly lean both ways. I use vi for editing config files and general text, and emacs for source code. emacs is also my editor of choice for email, and for editing TeX files, it has no equal. vi still has its uses though.

    emacs’s doctor is based on eliza, which I have used. Many, many times. I have LISP source for it somewhere. I have a compiled perl module for it on my machine right now, hooked into an AIM bot. It’s a classic AI pattern recognition program.

    Jason

     

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    Honorary Handsome Brute of TMO
    Bearded UNIX Guru-in-Training

    Call me jvarner; it’s shorter and doesn’t require capitalization.

         
  • Posted: 19 April 2002 10:47 PM #7

    M-x tetris (that is, option-x, type tetris)

     

    As a Tetris fan, I have to say that that is an appallingly bad version of Tetris, both the version in Emacs and XEmacs. (The XEmacs version gets a few extra points for at least being playable graphically) I mean geez, the falling pieces aren’t even random! And the drop key drops the piece immediately, instead of the proper acceleration.

    </tetrissnob>

    Well, the cookie recipe and all is fun.

     

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