iPod vs. External Hard Drive

  • Posted: 07 December 2006 01:56 PM #16

    [quote author=“thepoeticjuan”]I’m glad that you guys/gals happen to mention external hard drives for backup because I’ll have to get one very soon.  You see, everytime that I make a one hour movie of my daughter’s soccer game, it uses up about 12 gig of space on iMovie.  Then when I transfer it to iDVD, it uses alot more again.  I never thought that I would max out my 250g HD on my iMac but, I’m getting pretty close.  To free up some space while keeping the raw movie data, I’ve copied the movie clips for each game onto DVDs but, even then, I find myself using about 4 of them to accommodate the large files. 
    So the question is (and as always, I’m short on cash); what is the best-dollar-value/best-bang-for-the-buck for an external hard drive?

    Thanks

    So… what… you’re keeping the project files? Is that’s what’s clogging your hard drive? If so, why?

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  • Posted: 07 December 2006 02:11 PM #17

    Oh, BTW, when it comes to the best bang for your buck storage for movies, you can’t beat tape.

    Export your edited movie to DV tape. Tape is cheap. It can be re-imported into iMovie for later editing. It can easily be catalogued, stored and retrieved. It takes up little space.

    Magnetic tape has one major drawback, which is that it does degrade over time. Within five years, you would want to dupe footage to fresh media if you want to keep it longer. I have DV tape that is now almost five years old and it is showing some loss of quality, although only the tiniest bit of flattening of the colour, which can be fixed with a saturation boost in FCP.

    Tape, compared to HDs, is definitely the lesser of two evils given that HDs are prone to unexpected failure.

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    Posted: 07 December 2006 08:06 PM #18

    Back-ups

    I recomend that everyone who has not already done so read the following series of articles by Bob LeVitus (Dr. Bob) on backing up your info. 
     
    To quote Dr. Bob “There are two kinds of people; those who have lost data and those who will.”
    I have just bought an iMac for my Mom for Christmas and I also bought an external drive equal to the size of the hard drive so that she can have an off-site back-up.  Remember if your BU drive is next to your computer and the house burns down or a B&E specialist arrives; you will loose your back-up as well!
    The drive is also firewire so that it can be used to boot the machine.
    Good luck with your search.

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    Bob

         
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    Posted: 08 December 2006 11:14 AM #19

    [quote author=“coaten”]So… what… you’re keeping the project files? Is that’s what’s clogging your hard drive? If so, why?

    Thanks for the info coaten.  After burning a copy from iMovie through iDVD, I make an extra copy of the movie for backup.  Then, after loading up my hard drive with movie projects of raw movie data (and time permitting), I’ll backup the raw movie data (mp4) onto DVDs for backup purposes and possible future editing.  It all takes more time than I usually have for one sitting so that’s why my hard drive loads up.  After I’m done backing up the movie clips, I’ll delete the projects in both iMovie and iDVD.

    Something that I’d like to share about making movies on the Mac (even though I’m very new to it) is how simple and elegant it is.  In contrast, another team parent who decided he wanted to make movies of his daughter’s games as well, bought an newer PC, copy of Pinnacle, and a new camera (about the same time I did) and has had no luck making it work.  What a difference working with a Mac makes.  I burn extra copies to give to all of the girls and their parents, so at least he’ll have movies from this season.  Maybe by next season he will have figured out how to make it work? 


    Thanks for the link WetcoastBob, and thanks to the Doc and to TMO for providing the free info.  A couple of things though, the Doc doesn’t mention how long data will last on a typical CDR or a DVDR.  Furthermore, once a hard drive is full and set aside for storage, how long can it be expected for the data to last without being corrupted?  Otherwise, I thought that the article was full of very good information.

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    You can save your money to spend later on retirement, but you cannot save the days of your youth.  Therefore, spend some of your money on yourself and enjoy life now!       
      thepoeticjuan

         
  • Posted: 08 December 2006 03:56 PM #20

    We all work in different ways and, Poetic, you are of course entitled to create a workflow of your own choosing that meets your needs as you see fit.

    However, I wonder if you’re not unnecessarily making a rod for your back with one step there - the backing up of raw data for future possible editing.

    Two things - first, do you really believe you will find the time and inclination in the future to get around to repeating a project you’ve already worked on? For most of us, time is too precious for that and we realise this when we first approach a project we promised ourselves to getting around to doing; such as re-editing that soccer game.

    Now, by re-editing, you may be referring to creating a “highlights” reel of a season of soccer. I can understand that, which leads me to my second point…

    OK, so you’ve imported 60 minutes or less footage into iMovie. I’m assuming you’re using a DV camera or some other camera that uses tape. If you’re using a hard-drive camera, well… there’s nothing nice I have to say about that.

    Anyways, guess what… you’ve already made a back-up of the project files. It’s called the tape sitting in your camera. If you need to re-import footage for additional editing at some time in the future, you go to to your (ever so carefully labelled and organised) tape archive and retrieve the footage you need. Simple!

    You’ve saved time, money and wear and tear on your Mac’s hard drive.

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    Posted: 14 December 2006 05:57 AM #21

    [quote author=“Coaten”]OK, so you’ve imported 60 minutes or less footage into iMovie. I’m assuming you’re using a DV camera or some other camera that uses tape. If you’re using a hard-drive camera, well… there’s nothing nice I have to say about that.

    Funny you should mention the Hard-Drive cameras.  I first bought a Sony Hard-Drive camera, but I quickly returned it after learning that it recorded in MP2 and it did not support Firewire. What a pain in the neck that turned out to be.  With USB, I could not import directly into iMovie and then, I would have to acquire third party software to convert it so that I could view and edit the movie. Too much work and loss of quality so I went back and bought a Cannon ZR700 wich works OK.  My biggest complaint about the camera is that when filming in Widescreen, the quality of the movie drops significantly as opposed to filming in Standard mode.  Oh well, as the saying goes “you get what you paid for.”  Now I’ll have to save again for a semi-pro model camera, but then which one?  There are so many cameras out there…

    As far as backing up my film projects, I don’t know if there is a significant loss of quality when importing a previously made DVD movie which leads me to think that backing up the MP4 data is better?  It’s not so much the price of the mini DV tapes, but the space that they require for storage and the degradation over time of the contents.  I don’t know wich will last longer but, DVDs stack and store alot easier.  I’ll just have to keep my eyes and ears open for more information from experienced movie makers and, given more time and experience I’ll settle into a standard backup routine.

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    You can save your money to spend later on retirement, but you cannot save the days of your youth.  Therefore, spend some of your money on yourself and enjoy life now!       
      thepoeticjuan

         
  • Posted: 14 December 2006 12:26 PM #22

    Well, OK, you find DVDs easier to store than miniDV. I can’t imagine whay but let’s not get bogged down in arguments over volumetrics.

    What is way more important is that raw footage on tape is uncompressed or at least is significantly less compressed than MPEG-2 or MPEG-4.

    Have you yet re-edited a movie using archived MPEG-2 or 4 source? Are you happy with the results?

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