Using Frontpage (and Money)

  • Posted: 24 December 2006 08:07 AM

    OK, it seems that most questions about switching to a Mac OS have been raised and dealt with, BUT.. I am about to upgrade my computer and laptop and am leaning towards Macs. I know that the new Mac allows me to use existing window programmes using Boot Camp etc, but, I also use Frontpage for my website (http://www.tuscanbreaks.com - if your interested in a vacation in Tuscany!), The main worry I have is that if I update the site using a Mac (via Boot Camp), will I upset the end user display etc.

    I would really like to continue using Frontpage for this website (it took such a time), but cannot find any information of Frontpage for Macs - does it exist?

    I also use Microsoft Money. The sales guy in Italy tells me that there isn’t an equivalent Mac programme available (Do you Mac users never keep accounts?). He mentioned DOSH, but I do not think this has the same facilities as Microsoft Money.

    [ Edited: 04 May 2009 10:46 AM by Intruder ]      
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    Posted: 24 December 2006 09:23 AM #1

    The new Intel Macs can run Windows apps in one of three ways: either through BootCamp, Parallels or something WINE-based, such as Crossover. The first two work quite well. The third option is still very much in development.

    If you insist on using FrontPage, which doesn’t exist on the Mac, I would go with running Parallels, as it doesn’t require you to reboot the machine like BootCamp does. It also comes with a utility (called Transporter) that would essentially duplicate your existing Windows machine as a virtual machine on your Mac. This solution would also work for you to be able to run MS Money (although there are other finance management programs out there for the Mac, just not Money).

    Regardless, nothing would happen to the HTML code just because it was on the Mac.

    You might want to consider moving your website to a more standards-based website development software over time. FrontPage is notorious for non-compliant code. For example, Safari hangs on loading two of the elements on your page.

    Just a thought.

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  • Posted: 25 December 2006 11:57 AM #2

    A couple common finance apps for the Mac are Quicken and QuickBooks. However, I don’t use any such software so I don’t know exactly how they compare in terms of abilities and features.

    If you want a replacement WYSIWYG website editor for Mac, your best bet is probably Dreamweaver. http://www.adobe.com/products/dreamweaver/

    There is also a Free (open source) editor called Nvu, which is good on standards compliance, but may not be as useful for people managing large sites with templates, etc. http://nvu.com/

         
  • Posted: 25 December 2006 12:40 PM #3

    Frontpage. Brrrr. Frontpage on Parallels. Double Brrr.

    I can appreciate you wanting to maintain your site in the original editor you used to create it but have you considered that it may have taken so long to create because you were using Frontpage?

    Anyways, I’m with the oher guys. HTML is HTML and there’s vanilla-flavoured HTML on that Tuscany site of yours. The site will look the same Irrespective of the platform it was created on, except for one important consideration… it may look different depending on with which browser you preview it.

    This is why thoughtful developers who want to maximise their audience test their sites with different browsers and platforms.

    Now, as for your financial concerns, if you want a Mac accounting package, check these out:

    http://osx.hyperjeff.net/Apps/apps.php?sub=2

    I can recommend MYOB but only if you want a comprehensive double-entry system that won’t allow you to cut corners in your accounting obligations.

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  • Posted: 26 December 2006 05:48 AM #4

    I’ve used Quicken for years and have no complaints; I also use Pocket Quicken on my PDA when I travel and sync the two later.

    As for web sites, I use Freeway Express , but I don’t know about how it deals with Frontpage docs.

         
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    Posted: 26 December 2006 08:37 AM #5

    Forget FrontPuke

    Give up on FrontPage.

    1. Microsoft has dropped the product.

    2. FP generates crappy code. Cluttered and non-standard. It also rewrites your code. Bad dog.

    3. Dreamweaver runs under both Windows and Mac OS. Professionals use DW because it is a much better tool. Supports both WYSIWYG and hand coding.

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  • Posted: 26 December 2006 10:42 AM #6

    I would not rely on Front Page for webpage editing. If you look at most Front Page websites, they don’t follow w3.org conventions, and break on many web browsers.  My web browser FAQ has resources to help you avoid those pitfalls:

    http://www.macmaps.com/browser.html

    And I would recommend avoiding WYSIWYG editors, and frequently they force code upon you that doesn’t always work right.  Learn HTML with a tool which simplifies it like http://www.barebones.com/ BBEdit, and you will be well on your way to building much more compatible websites, and much more secure websites.

    As for finding other software, I’ve made this FAQ:

    http://www.macmaps.com/macosxnative.html

    Which has links to software download links for the Mac, as well as all the virtualization options:

    http://www.macmaps.com/macosxnative.html#WINTEL

    Also when I tried Dreamweaver, it tried to force relative links on my website without my asking it to.  Any web page editor which changes the code of your existing webpage without explaining why it is changing the code and when I think should be avoided.

         
  • Posted: 26 December 2006 12:26 PM #7

    Both FrontPage and Money have better alternatives

    While Parallels will let you run Windows and install your FrontPage and Money on it, you will need to pay for a Windows license. Now, among web designers and developers, FrontPage is famous for the worst tool for the job. Not only does it not allow you to create standard HTML (i.e. pages built in FP always have at least some quirk that shows poorly on FireFox, Opera, Safari, Netscape, etc.), but it also creates unnecesarilly bloated HTML/javascript code for things that could be infinitely simpler. Your web site looks very nice; it seems like it was designed by a professional (designer). However, a number of small things render poorly in Firefox and Safari. These two browsers most likely make up one in 7 visitors to your site. If I were you, I would make every effort to get another tool for creating web-sites. Most popular (especially for graphic designers, as opposed to programmers) is Dreamweaver, since it gives you similar layout-type tool.

    As for Money, there has always been debate between Money and Quicken users which is better. Many of them say it’s Quicken. One thing is certain; Quicken can easilly import data from Money, as long as it is exported from Money in some standard format.

    In conclusion, I could not strees this any stronger: move away from FrontPage as quickly as you possibly can. Your site will become trully compatible. Second, try Quicken (you can do it on Windows too), I’m sure you’ll be pleasantly surprised how well it works, compared to Money.

    One final note; all this advice is still subjective. There is a chance you may struggle learning to change your habits around different tool. This completely depends on yourself. If you’re rigid and like the thing the way they are, perhaps MacBook is not for you after all. If you accept change easilly, you’ll do well here.

         
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    Posted: 26 December 2006 01:53 PM #8

    [quote author=“gopher”]And I would recommend avoiding WYSIWYG editors, and frequently they force code upon you that doesn’t always work right.  Learn HTML with a tool which simplifies it like http://www.barebones.com/ BBEdit, and you will be well on your way to building much more compatible websites, and much more secure websites.

    Probably true, though I’ve seen a lot of websites that were done “by hand” that had terrible problems. It’s really easy to miss closing a tag, for example.

    There’s another consideration: “Learn HTML” may require 100-500 hours to do what he wants to do, then will require months to learn how to debug a site. Unless one is a professional web designer, it may not be worth the effort. I never recommend a course of action to someone unless I know their circumstances. I could suggest that gopher not use Excel, Word, Pages, Keynote, AppleWorks, or other WYSIWG programs, but, instead, write all his/her documents in C++, Pascal, etc, from scratch, every time. After all, Word inserts all sorts of unnecessary coding into a document.

         
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    Posted: 26 December 2006 02:16 PM #9

    [quote author=“gopher”]I would not rely on Front Page for webpage editing.

    And I would recommend avoiding WYSIWYG editors…

    Also when I tried Dreamweaver, it tried to force relative links on my website without my asking it to.

    1. I agree (obviously) with Gopher on the “no FrontPage”.

    2. I do not agree on “avoid WYSIWYG editors”. I use Dreamweaver in both the “design” view and the “code”. Creating a table in design view is 10x easier than in code view. Importing paragraphs from Word docs is so much easier in design view. Both techniques have their strengths and weaknesses. Understand your tools and work within their limits.

    3. Dreamweaver’s default is relative links. I personally prefer relative links.
    a. You can tell DW to never rewrite your code and it won’t with one small exception.
    b. You can tell DW to use absolute links if you want.

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  • Posted: 26 December 2006 02:29 PM #10

    [quote author=“davebarnes”]1. I agree (obviously) with Gopher on the “no FrontPage”.

    2. I do not agree on “avoid WYSIWYG editors”. I use Dreamweaver in both the “design” view and the “code”. Creating a table in design view is 10x easier than in code view. Importing paragraphs from Word docs is so much easier in design view. Both techniques have their strengths and weaknesses. Understand your tools and work within their limits.

    3. Dreamweaver’s default is relative links. I personally prefer relative links.
    a. You can tell DW to never rewrite your code and it won’t with one small exception.
    b. You can tell DW to use absolute links if you want.

    What he said. I’m impressed that you are such a confident codemonkey, Gopher, that you can create without WYSIWYG but that gives you no right to disrespect what so many people regard as the best editor on the market just because it’s a WYSIWYG.

    Especially when you so clearly haven’t examined it closely enough to know its true capabilities.

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    Posted: 26 December 2006 03:10 PM #11

    Re: Both FrontPage and Money have better alternatives

    [quote author=“vasic”]While Parallels will let you run Windows and install your FrontPage and Money on it, you will need to pay for a Windows license.

    This is true unless you have a WIndows machine that you are getting rid of. The latest version of Parallels comes with Transporter, which will allow you to clone the existing PC into a virtual hard drive for Parallels. It will also convert VPC virtual machines.

    Now, if it would convert a Parallels virtual HDD to be used with BootCamp, that would be cool.

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    Posted: 26 December 2006 07:15 PM #12

    Re: Both FrontPage and Money have better alternatives

    [quote author=“Intruder”][quote author=“vasic”]While Parallels will let you run Windows and install your FrontPage and Money on it, you will need to pay for a Windows license.

    This is true unless you have a WIndows machine that you are getting rid of. The latest version of Parallels comes with Transporter, which will allow you to clone the existing PC into a virtual hard drive for Parallels. It will also convert VPC virtual machines.

    Now, if it would convert a Parallels virtual HDD to be used with BootCamp, that would be cool.

    That assumes that you’re not selling or giving away the PC with Windows installed. If you are, legally, the license will go with it. Otherwise, either you or the person you sell the PC to would be using a pirated copy of Windows.

         
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    Posted: 26 December 2006 08:20 PM #13

    I don’t disagree. Just pointing out that it can transfer from another machine.

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  • Posted: 26 December 2006 11:31 PM #14

    There is NO substitue for Money

    As a former Windows user and recent switcher, I can tell you that the easiest way to accomplish what you are doing is to use parallels. I have been using it since its initial beta release and it is an excellent product. I too am a Microsoft Money user and can tell you from LOTS of experience that there is NO equivalent financial package available for the Mac. I have purchased several “alternatives” and wasted lots of time, money, and a couple of overdraft charges, just to return to Money 2007 a few weeks ago. As for everyone’s distaste for Frontpage, I would agree with them. However, to answer your actual question, Parallels is your best answer to seamlessly move over to the Mac. When you have a chance, I would recommend Dreamweaver as a better professional alternative. I you want to stay with something completely wysiwyg, then try Apple’s iWeb (part of iLife ‘06). I would wait until January when iLife ‘07 comes out. I would also recommend RealMac’s Rapidweaver. Both give you EASY website creation through the use of themes. I hope this helps.

         
  • Posted: 27 December 2006 01:07 AM #15

    Thanks!

    Thanks guys for your advice. It sure seems that Mac users are more friendly!

    A change from Frontpage seems a high hill to climb just at the moment, but added to the “things to do” list for 2007