AAPL News Updates (Archive)

  • Posted: 29 October 2008 09:28 AM #16

    Re: Most Admired and most Innovative

    [quote author=“cramar”]Fortune ranked Apple as #1:

    Most Admired Company

    and also for Innovation:

    Most Admired for Innovation

    Old news. That’s from an issue of Fortune that was published back in March.

         
  • Posted: 29 October 2008 09:34 AM #17

    Apple’s $24.5 billion: The case for a big stock buyback

    Toni Sacconaghi says conditions are right for Steve Jobs to use that cash horde to purchase Apple stock.

    http://apple20.blogs.fortune.cnn.com/2008/10/29/apples-245-billion-the-case-for-a-big-stock-buyback/

    He cites an interesting formula:

    ?Mathematically,? Sacconaghi writes ?share buybacks boost EPS only if a stock?s P/E multiple is lower than the reciprocal of the after-tax interest rate earned on cash.?

         
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    Posted: 29 October 2008 09:36 AM #18

    Re: Most Admired and most Innovative

    philiped,

    Is it possible for you or influence someone, in fortune to publish an article educating public about GAAP, non-GAAP and subscription accounting?

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    Posted: 29 October 2008 09:56 AM #19

    Re: Apple’s $24.5 billion: The case for a big stock buyback

    [quote author=“philiped”]Toni Sacconaghi says conditions are right for Steve Jobs to use that cash horde to purchase Apple stock.

    If they want to reward investors with cash, then a dividend is the right way to go. Any share buyback now will not reward current investors other than a quick pop, and the shorts will only go and take it off the table.

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    Posted: 29 October 2008 10:14 AM #20

    Dividend is the right way to go

    [quote author=“wheeles”] ... If they want to reward investors with cash, then a dividend is the right way to go ...

    Agree.  Still not the right time to distribute.  IMHO, right timing is when AAPL is in DJIA, negative return impact of subscription accounting on earlier quarters is minimal, and the double taxation of dividend is resolved.

    I dislike major acquisitions (usually too much premium) and share buybacks (those meant to boost eps).

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    Posted: 29 October 2008 10:47 AM #21

    Apple Market Share: The Sound of Breaking Windows

      Mac acceptance in business

    In the conversation I had last week with Kyle Arteaga, VP, Corporate Communications for Serena, he mentioned that Serena had given their employees the choice of whether to have a PC or a Mac, for a laptop or desktop. He said that roughly 60 chose to have a Mac. Such straws in the wind speak volumes.

    Nowadays, whenever I run into software engineers or engineers of any kind, I ask them what computer they personally use. The answer is ?The Mac? most of the time, and they often manage to persuade their employers to give them a Mac at work. Why is that significant, given that most of the developers I run into are developing server software? It?s significant because such people are opinion leaders. Most such individuals end up being technical support for those who have less affinity for silicon and now that so many of them have moved over to the Mac, they are dragging their dependents with them. (Which is exactly what I did when I moved to the Mac, turning my wife, my sister, my niece and two of my sons into Mac users.)

         
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    Posted: 29 October 2008 10:47 AM #22

    Re: Dividend is the right way to go

    [quote author=“Mace”]I dislike major acquisitions (usually too much premium) and share buybacks (those meant to boost eps).

    Not an expert on subject, but it just makes logical sense that:

    a) If you are going to buyback some shares, you do it when the stock is down (under $90 was perfect).

    b) Buying back your own shares is an investment in yourself and takes stock out of the hands of outsiders espcially speculators.

    I dunno, but if I was SJ, and AAPL gets hammered big time like it was, I’d see this as a fantastic opportunity from an investment point of view. Nothing to do with boosting eps. Again what better returns than putting cash into yourself when you ARE the best investment around. Just makes total logical sense to me.

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  • Posted: 29 October 2008 10:52 AM #23

    Interesting piece from changewave.

    http://blog.changewave.com/2008/10/apple-earnings-call2.html#more

    Notes that the Mac unit growth number is hazy but the longer term view is still very positive.  This might be one big “duh” to most here but important to keep in mind.  The notebook may be technology that the competitors won’t choose to match but it would be pretty difficult to drive the costs down unless someone found a way to make those CNC machines move a lot faster!  wink It’s strictly a one at a time operation so there is no real economies of scale price benefit.

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    Posted: 29 October 2008 01:59 PM #24

    Eric,

    I called AAPL up 9% then some trend down, and you guys laughed.

    Well, open at 100 high at 109.5O

    Looks like I “won” the coin toss prediction for today.

    :innocent:  :idea:  8-)

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  • Posted: 30 October 2008 02:33 AM #25

    I think it is widely assumed that the iPhone sales are mostly to affluent and upper income individuals and families. Later today Comscore has a study that I find shocking. It seems that lower income families are not a small part of iPhone sales. Here from the WSJ is more info

    Some Shed Their Gadgets by Turning to One: iPhone
    By SARA SILVER
    Lower-income households are turning in force to Apple Inc.‘s iPhone and may be doing so to save the cost of a separate broadband connection and music devices, according to the media measurement firm comScore Inc.

    A comScore study, set to be released Thursday, shows that the fastest growth in iPhone sales over the summer months came from households that earn less than the median income. ComScore noted sales to lower-income consumers accelerated since the July appearance of the iPhone 3G, which offers high-speed Internet access.

    “We see that lower-income consumers are increasingly turning to mobile devices to access the Internet, to listen to music and for email,” said Mark Donovan, senior analyst at comScore. “A ‘Swiss-Army knife of a device’ like the iPhone offers a phone, a music player, a camera and a way to connect to the Internet, which may appeal to consumers cutting back their spending on gadgets.”

    Ownership of the iPhone rose 48% from June 1 to the end of August among households earning between $25,000 and $50,000 a year, compared to 21% overall, the study showed. Adoption of smart phones in this segment grew 16% over that period, ahead of the market average of 12%. Mobile-browser use grew 4.9% among lower-income consumers, versus 2.7% overall, and their mobile music-listening rose 4.7%, compared to an overall decline of 0.3%. Email use, however, slightly lagged.

    The study tracked changes in comScore’s monthly online survey of 33,962 mobile-phone users. There were 2.6 million U.S. users of the iPhone at the end of August, which represented just 1% of U.S. cellphone users, according to comScore. The trend of rising sales and usage among lower-income consumers emerged despite a slight decline in the number of such households, which contain a large number of retired women and consumers ages 25 to 34.

    While consumers have long used cellphones to substitute for landlines, U.S. telecom operators have recently also reported sharp slowdowns in the number of households adding broadband lines to access the Internet from home. Verizon Wireless, a joint venture of Vodafone PLC and Verizon Communications Inc., on Monday said it lost 96,000 DSL subscribers in the quarter.

    Already, lower-income and older consumers are less likely to subscribe to broadband than average, according to a recent report from the Pew Internet & American Life Project, and 35% of dial-up Internet users cite price as the primary reason for not upgrading.

    Others believe that the surge in popularity of the iPhone among lower-income consumers is related more to the decline in price to about $200. “You had this device that inspired gadget lust suddenly put within reach,” said George Calhoun, a professor and entrepreneur-in-residence at the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, N.J.

    Write to Sara Silver at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

         
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    Posted: 30 October 2008 05:22 AM #26

    Softbank Mobile to Sell iPhone 3G Battery Extender with Mobi

    Softbank Mobile today announces a new external battery for iPhone 3G, letting iPhone 3G users in Japan to charge their iPhone anytime anywhere. The battery extender can also receive the One-Seg media broadcast, it will then transmit the video via WiFi signal to iPhone 3G. With one full battery charged it can receive and transmit video continuously for 3 hours. The company plan to start selling the add-on from mid-December this year.

      Here

         
  • Posted: 30 October 2008 05:56 AM #27

    There are a few external batteries available in the US that add power, but nothing else. What is the One-Seg broadcast?

         
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    Posted: 30 October 2008 05:59 AM #28

    [quote author=“SNIPUS”]I think it is widely assumed that the iPhone sales are mostly to affluent and upper income individuals and families. Later today Comscore has a study that I find shocking. It seems that lower income families are not a small part of iPhone sales.

    I’m embarrassed that I did not foresee this. The focus was on adding the iPhone to a list of gadgets rather than allowing people to finally have access to them for the first time. When looked at in this light, the iPhone makes amazing economic sense.  smile

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    Posted: 30 October 2008 06:26 AM #29

    [quote author=“willrob”]There are a few external batteries available in the US that add power, but nothing else. What is the One-Seg broadcast?

    That is the wireless tv in Japan

         
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    Posted: 30 October 2008 06:40 AM #30

    [quote author=“SNIPUS”]I think it is widely assumed that the iPhone sales are mostly to affluent and upper income individuals and families. Later today Comscore has a study that I find shocking. It seems that lower income families are not a small part of iPhone sales. Here from the WSJ is more info

    I don’t find this at all surprising, especially as outside the US (and in particular in some of the larger European markets) the iPhone can be had for free or for just the local equivalent of a few bucks on certain talk plans. If its free, why would you get a <insertNameofAnyCrappyCellphoneHere> instead of an iPhone?  :idea:

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