MacWorld Rumors

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    Posted: 07 January 2009 09:06 AM #31

    hledgard - 07 January 2009 12:57 PM

    The 17” Pro looks terrific!  A knockout in my opinion.

    It’s interesting how many are panning it over at MacRumors; albeit, most folks criticize everything Apple does as either too expensive or providing too little value.  rolleyes

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    Posted: 09 January 2009 07:38 PM #32

    Pogue?s Posts | The Latest in Technology From David Pogue
    January 8, 2009, 1:09 pm
    A Strange Macworld Expo

    Well, it was a strange Macworld Expo this year. Steve Jobs, usually the looming presence over this four-day Mac/iPod/iPhone confab in San Francisco, was completely absent. Apple had a toned-down presence, and everybody knew that next year, the company won?t be here at all, which made everyone wonder how long the event can survive.

    What the media wants to see is the annual Steve Jobs keynote speech, where Apple?s latest products are often unveiled. So: no press throngs next year. The software companies in those hundreds of booths want to be near the mother ship, to bask in its glory and be seen by its admirers. So: fewer booths next year. And the regular Apple fans want to see that keynote, try out those Apple products and explore those booths. So: fewer attendees.

    The Expo will certainly take place next year?many exhibitors have already committed to return?and maybe all the training classes, social events and entertainment of the Expo will be enough to keep the event going for years, in some form. Otherwise, nobody knows.

    So how was Apple?s final keynote presentation, given by marketing executive Phil Schiller? Since everyone?s expectations for hot new announcements were about zero, it?s safe to say that the keynote pretty much fulfilled expectations.

    There were no new category-busting products, no shockers. But there were some smaller, evolutionary gems. Here were three of my favorites.

    First: an updated iPhoto (a picture organizing/editing/sharing program). Like Google?s Picasa (originally for Windows, now for Mac, too), iPhoto offers face recognition. But iPhoto actually knows *whose* faces are in your photos?and can automatically group your photos by the subjects in them.
    It?s not 100 percent accurate, of course; you?re supposed to guide its artificial intelligence by clicking photos (to say ?you guessed right?that?s mom?) or double-clicking them (?you guessed wrong?that?s not mom?). But having iPhoto auto-create a folder full of son photos or wife photos or grandma photos would be plenty handy.

    Second: an updated iMovie ?09. Now, longtime readers may recall that I absolutely hated iMovie ?08. It wasn?t iMovie at all; Apple completely junked the beloved iMovie that had served it well for years, and replaced it with something completely unrecognizable, riddled with feature holes.
    Some of those holes are filled in the new version (video effects, slow/fast motion, direct export to iDVD) and some aren?t (no export back to tape, no volume-level ?rubber banding?). Overall, though, iMovie ?09 appears to be vastly more usable and complete than iMovie ?08 was. Especially when you consider its killer new feature: software stabilization.

    This program can do an insanely great job of turning a bouncy, jerky handheld camcorder shot into something smooth and level (following a long period of analysis; let it run unattended while you go get lunch). I tried it on about five different clips, some of which were VERY unsteady. It works so well, a couple of observers complained that it looked unnatural; the floaty SteadiCam feeling is so noticeable, it doesn?t look like home movies anymore. No big deal; you can double-click a stabilized clip to open up an intensity slider that you can adjust to back off the effect.

    In general, this feature could do wonders for the great majority of amateur videos.

    I wasn?t able to try either iPhoto or iMovie with my own picture and videos?the software won?t be ready until the end of the month. But they sure look juicy.

    Third cool thing: Apple is removing the copy protection from every single song on the iTunes store. You?ll soon be able to copy your songs freely from computer to computer to TiVo to Sonos player to non-iPod player, without ever having to worry about authorizing computers, entering passwords and so on.

    Apple convinced the record companies to agree to this arrangement, but there was a price: iTunes has lost its simple 99-cents-a-song pricing. The record companies want to charge more for popular songs ($1.29), the same old price for medium-hot songs (99 cents), and less for oldy moldies to help wring some sales out of them (69 cents). The new pricing structure could help some people, and hurt others.

    I spoke with Phil Schiller after his talk. I asked him if he could be any more specific about why Apple pulled out of the Macworld Expo?to the heartbreak of the Mac faithful who have loved making the pilgrimage to this event for 25 years.

    He said what the Apple press release said?that Apple stores introduce more people to Apple?s products in a week than 100 Macworld Expos. Trade shows just aren?t worth the effort and the money.
    But he also pointed out that having to come up with another dazzling show every January?a huge production, starring knock-?em-dead new products every year?was unsustainable. He noted that Apple marches to certain annual product cycles: the holiday season (Novemberish), the educational buying season (late summer), the iPod product cycle (October), the iLife development cycle (usually March), the iPhone cycle (June). January doesn?t fit ANY of them.

    Today, I?m off to Las Vegas for CES, the Consumer Exhaustion Show. More to come!

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    Posted: 09 January 2009 09:18 PM #33

    TanToday - 09 January 2009 11:38 PM

    Pogue?s Posts | The Latest in Technology From David Pogue
    January 8, 2009, 1:09 pm
    A Strange Macworld Expo

    It’s not a good idea to post an entire article like this. It’s potentially a serious violation of copyright. Instead, post a link to the article.

         
  • Posted: 10 January 2009 02:13 AM #34

    Indeed. Bad form.

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  • Posted: 10 January 2009 09:13 AM #35

    Gosh guys, I hate to say it, but I loved reading the post by TanToday.  I guess I am lazy, I may not have read the article if it had been a link. 

    I agree for sure with the principle (post links to long articles, especially to keep the AFB threads to a manageable length).  But I guess this post by Pogue was just so well written and informative.

    PS I wish Pogue had given his reaction to the 17” MacBook.

         
  • Posted: 10 January 2009 05:34 PM #36

    OK, well, two words…. plagiarism and copyright infringement. Oh, that was four words, dang. Copyright infringement in Australia can earn you a fine of $10,000 and, in the case of a company, up to $10 million. Not too sure what the penalties are in the USA where TMO is registered. This, I would think, would be good enough reason for mods to truncate the quote.

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    Posted: 10 January 2009 05:40 PM #37

    coaten - 10 January 2009 09:34 PM

    OK, well, two words…. plagiarism and copyright infringement. Oh, that was four words, dang. Copyright infringement in Australia can earn you a fine of $10,000 and, in the case of a company, up to $10 million. Not too sure what the penalties are in the USA where TMO is registered. This, I would think, would be good enough reason for mods to truncate the quote.

    What Tan did is hardly plagiarism.  He never claim the work was his own and he cites the author and title.  Obviously the NY Times probably says you can’t reproduce the article in whole but for Academic purposes this is a minor fopa compared to all the stuff going on.  When I still worked for DOD we had a clipping service which provide all news articles relevant to the DOD.  Called the Early Bird.  Cut him some slack.

         
  • Posted: 10 January 2009 05:59 PM #38

    Ah yes, but the DOD (I assume Department of Defense), because it is taxpayer-funded, must offer all its intellectual property not otherwise protected by national security restrictions in the public domain. Just like NASA. You can still get copies of Neil Armstrong’s moonwalk for free. It is licensed for public domain usage.

    You are right about the plagiarism. Of course it’s not, but plagiarism and copyright infringement are two sides of the same coin, I mentioned them together in what I thought was a reasonable effort to draw a light context for a serious legal infringement.

    And that’s what it is. By letter of the law, as I understand it, the poster has infringed David Pogue’s and the NYT’s copyright. This is an offense. I’ve been a member of this forum since 2001, buddy, and the reason for both my longevity here and the voracity of this response is because I care about TMO - enough to want TMO not to be fined a huge amount of money, as unlikely as that may be. I had the pleasure of meeting Bryan at the Macworld Expo and it seems to me that having to deal with the weight of NYT’s lawyers is something he could and should live without.

    Besides, surely a link would have been no more difficult to include in the post, and we could make use of the web as it was intended to be: if you’re curious, click. BTW, it’s faux pas, not fopa.

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    Posted: 10 January 2009 09:34 PM #39

    I doubt David Pogue/NYT are gonna take any action, but it’s better and safer to just quote snippets or just link to the article.

    [ Edited: 10 January 2009 09:37 PM by Mav ]

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  • Posted: 10 January 2009 10:58 PM #40

    Mav - 11 January 2009 01:34 AM

    I doubt David Pogue/NYT are gonna take any action, but it’s better and safer to just quote snippets or just link to the article.

    That’s what I said.

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  • Posted: 10 January 2009 11:57 PM #41

    Legal issues aside, posting articles versus links makes for very long posts and additional topic pages.

    With the Expo now over, this topic has become a bit outdated. Time to lock it and move beyond this year’s Expo.