Palm Pre Review

  • Posted: 01 June 2009 02:12 PM #16

    The problem with Apple’s iPhone is that the product is locked to the one size and form-factor.  Because the app store is such a big part of the iPhone’s success and competitive advantage, Changing the screen size or resolution brings the application base back to square 1.  From what I’ve seen about the pre, the application window has to be felxible, a feature that should give Palm a greater flexibility than Apple going forward.  Hardware-wise, apple can make tweaks, but these releases shouldn’t garner much news or buzz—and will offer little to get the current iPhone customer to upgrade.

    P.S.  I think the digital compass will be the coolest new element of the next hardware release.  Combined with the existing accelerometer, this should allow more precise and robust motion controls for gaming.  I think that such a capability can be demoed in apple fashion to render a proper “wow” factor and make the new iPhone cooler than the previous.

         
  • Posted: 01 June 2009 02:24 PM #17

    azarkon - 01 June 2009 05:12 PM

    The problem with Apple’s iPhone is that the product is locked to the one size and form-factor.  Because the app store is such a big part of the iPhone’s success and competitive advantage, Changing the screen size or resolution brings the application base back to square 1.  From what I’ve seen about the pre, the application window has to be felxible, a feature that should give Palm a greater flexibility than Apple going forward.  Hardware-wise, apple can make tweaks, but these releases shouldn’t garner much news or buzz—and will offer little to get the current iPhone customer to upgrade.

    P.S.  I think the digital compass will be the coolest new element of the next hardware release.  Combined with the existing accelerometer, this should allow more precise and robust motion controls for gaming.  I think that such a capability can be demoed in apple fashion to render a proper “wow” factor and make the new iPhone cooler than the previous.

    Resolution independence was purportedly part of the Leopard release but didn’t show up in the final product.  Assuming that it does at some point in the future, wouldn’t that address your screen size and resolution concerns?

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    Posted: 01 June 2009 02:44 PM #18

    BillH - 01 June 2009 05:24 PM
    azarkon - 01 June 2009 05:12 PM

    The problem with Apple’s iPhone is that the product is locked to the one size and form-factor ...

    Resolution independence was purportedly part of the Leopard release but didn’t show up in the final product.  Assuming that it does at some point in the future, wouldn’t that address your screen size and resolution concerns?

    Having one size and form factor is intentional.  Goal is to allow fast development of apps and minimize updates.  Ofc, lower cost of manufacturing and logistics.

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  • Posted: 01 June 2009 02:57 PM #19

    BillH - 01 June 2009 05:24 PM

    Resolution independence was purportedly part of the Leopard release but didn’t show up in the final product.  Assuming that it does at some point in the future, wouldn’t that address your screen size and resolution concerns?

    I think the iPhone os is based on Tiger and not Leopard.

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    Posted: 01 June 2009 03:43 PM #20

    litespeed - 29 May 2009 11:58 PM

    If rumors are true, the next gen iPhone seems a little meh.

    Meh?!

    I have to totally disagree. I’m personally very happy with my own 1st-gen iPhone, with all it’s current capabilities and especially all of its potential for future features and options. Not to mention the many cool (and some not so cool) apps that are available to enhance what’s already there. I also think that all of the confirmed and all-but-verified new features in iPhone OS 3.0 will just make the phone even more useful.

    litespeed - 29 May 2009 11:58 PM

    Sorry ratty, has nothing to do with day trading. I still own first gen iPhone and I am waiting for something a little more than meh to get me to pay higher rates that AT&T charges for second and presumably 3rd-gen iPhone plans.

    I pretty much agree here. I kept my 1st-gen iPhone, not only because I couldn’t justify spending a bunch of money to replace a perfectly good phone, but I didn’t want to spend the additional $15+ a month to get what I’m basically getting from AT&T now. I hardly ever browse the web when I’m mobile, so 3G ‘speed’ is of limited value to me. What I’d like a lot more than enhanced 3G speeds is just good AT&T coverage in more areas. I can hardly get a signal in my condo.

    However, going back to what I said before, I think it’s iPhone OS 3.x (then 4.x, 5.x, etc.), much more than some basic enhancements to the specs of the next iteration of the iPhone handset, that are really compelling. And, of course, the OS upgrades don’t require paying AT&T any more money. At least, not yet. We’ll see if AT&T tries to pull that trick. If so, I can see a class action lawsuit, or Apple becoming very unhappy with AT&T when people start ditching AT&T along with their iPhones.

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    Posted: 01 June 2009 03:43 PM #21

    I haven’t read what y’all discussed above, but one little bit of buzz going around is that since the Palm Pre has a webkit based browser, web apps that run on iPhone might run very nicely on Pre. Web apps for webkit-enabled phones will end up being a far more interesting development platform than native apps in a fragmented market.

         
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    Posted: 01 June 2009 04:20 PM #22

    rattyuk - 01 June 2009 05:57 PM
    BillH - 01 June 2009 05:24 PM

    Resolution independence was purportedly part of the Leopard release but didn’t show up in the final product.  Assuming that it does at some point in the future, wouldn’t that address your screen size and resolution concerns?

    I think the iPhone os is based on Tiger and not Leopard.

    Resolution Independence has existed in both Tiger & Leopard as part of the Quartz graphics system which is also used in Cocoa Touch.  The problem is developers use bit map graphics and they are based on the specific IPhone resolution.  If a developer used vector graphics then they will scale


    http://developer.apple.com/releasenotes/GraphicsImaging/RN-ResolutionIndependentUI/index.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40001374

         
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    Posted: 01 June 2009 04:40 PM #23

    Bosco - 01 June 2009 06:43 PM

    I haven’t read what y’all discussed above, but one little bit of buzz going around is that since the Palm Pre has a webkit based browser, web apps that run on iPhone might run very nicely on Pre. Web apps for webkit-enabled phones will end up being a far more interesting development platform than native apps in a fragmented market.

    I seem to recall the developer reaction to the initial ‘web-based-only’ app development option for the iPhone to be luke-warm, at best. Most iPhone developers jumped for joy when Apple announced real development tools for the iPhone and made them a reality. Since then, most of the real apps for the iPhone (other then things like some online movie time tracking and ticket ordering) have been made into ‘true’ iPhone native apps.

    So, sure, Palm Pre users might be happy to have access to web apps designed for the iPhone, but I don’t think there are many outstanding examples of iPhone web apps and I definitely don’t think that there will be any big rush by developers to jump back into AJAX-based web app development, just to make apps that will work on the Palm Pre, but that most iPhone users probably won’t care about at all.

    Also, while the Palm Pre may be a cool handset, there is a lot less differentiation between it and other handsets that are similar to the iPhone (notice, I did not say “iPhone knock-offs”), than there is between the all of those and the iPhone. The key to that, again, is the large number of apps, and the general quality of apps available for the iPhone. If I’m not mistaken, the closest competitor to the iPhone, in the arena of app stores, is the Google Android platform, and the numbers show that its success hasn’t even remotely matched iPhone app sales. As a matter of fact, this web site http://androidstats.com/ shows that Android developers are offering big discounts on their apps, even making a lot of apps free, that weren’t free before. That doesn’t bode well for what is currently the iPhone’s biggest competitor.

    Here is a quote from an iPhone and Android developer, on Google’s own app developer discussion forum, that accentuates the point:

    “Application sales in Android are not only bad, they are extremely bad. I have an application in iPhone and every single day I sale copies. I’m not rich but it is enough to pay my rent and then some. In Android I released the same app and sales are bad, no, extremely bad. I cannot even pay for a meal at a restaurant. I’m now convinced that until sales start to pick up, if ever, it is extremely stupid for me to develop for Android. I will now only develop for Apple.”

    Maybe Palm will find a way to really compete with the iPhone App Store, and maybe not. We’ll see…

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