Microsoft’s Danger not in the Pink

  • Posted: 10 October 2009 04:48 PM

    Earlier this week, an anonymous tipster leaked the news that Microsoft’s top secret Pink project, aimed to take on the iPhone just as the Zune targeted the iPod, was “near death and probably will be canceled.” Another source has now spilled even more details about the internal crisis brewing within the company and how the failure of Pink relates to iPhone, Google’s Android, and Windows Mobile.

    Full article here

         
  • Posted: 10 October 2009 07:25 PM #1

    No one expected Apple to reach billions of downloads and almost 100k apps in the store. That’s a game changer and requires rewriting the battle plan. Any smart phone released now without a well-eqipped app store will be short-lived in the market. Better not to release a product than release a flop or be forced to spend billions on promotion and sales support with shareholders watching closely.

         
  • Posted: 10 October 2009 09:52 PM #2

    willrob - 10 October 2009 07:48 PM

    Earlier this week, an anonymous tipster leaked the news that Microsoft’s top secret Pink project, aimed to take on the iPhone just as the Zune targeted the iPod, was “near death and probably will be canceled.” Another source has now spilled even more details about the internal crisis brewing within the company and how the failure of Pink relates to iPhone, Google’s Android, and Windows Mobile.

    Full article here


    Ah, beat me to it.  Yes, the Pink project is bleeding…

         
  • Posted: 11 October 2009 09:39 PM #3

    gone

    [ Edited: 11 October 2009 09:53 PM by willrob ]      
  • Posted: 11 October 2009 09:52 PM #4

    Microsoft’s Danger SideKick data loss casts dark on cloud computing

    By Daniel Eran Dilger


    Microsoft has demonstrated that the dark side of cloud computing has no silver linings. After a major server outage occurred on its watch last weekend, users dependent on the company have just been informed that their personal data and photos “has almost certainly been lost.”

    While occasional service outages have hit nearly everyone in the business, knocking Google’s Gmail offline for hours, plunging RIM’s BlackBerrys into the dark, or leaving Apple’s MobileMe web apps unreachable to waves of users, Microsoft’s high profile outage has impacted users in the worst possible way: the company has unrecoverable lost nearly all of its users’ data, and now has no alternative backup plan for recovering any of it a week later.

    The outage and data loss affects all SideKick customers of the Danger group Microsoft purchased in early 2008. Danger maintained a significant online services business for T-Mobile’s SideKick users. All of T-Mobile’s SideKick phone users rely on Danger’s online service to supply applications such as contacts, calendars, IM and SMS, media player, and other features of the device, and to store the data associated with those applications.

    When Microsoft’s Danger servers began to fall offline last Friday October 2, users across the country couldn’t even use the services; even after functionality was beginning to be brought back on Tuesday October 6, users still didn’t have their data back. This Saturday, after a week of efforts to solve the crisis, T-Mobile finally announced to its SideKick subscribers:

    ?Regrettably, based on Microsoft/Danger?s latest recovery assessment of their systems, we must now inform you that personal information stored on your device ? such as contacts, calendar entries, to-do lists or photos ? that is no longer on your Sidekick almost certainly has been lost as a result of a server failure at Microsoft/Danger.?

    A new report from Engadget says that T-Mobile has suspended sales of its SideKick models and is warning: “Sidekick customers, during this service disruption, please DO NOT remove your battery, reset your Sidekick, or allow it to lose power.”

    SideKick and the iPhone

    Danger’s SideKick platform bears some resemblance to the iPhone; Danger brought the GSM SideKick to market by partnering exclusively with T-Mobile. The partnership involves custom network services that makes features of the device unusable on other networks, and of course the phones are physically incompatible with the CDMA service operated by Verizon/Sprint. In some ways, Microsoft’s purchase of Danger is exactly the fix recommended by some pundits for Apple’s iPhone: a third party who could swoop in and break the iPhone’s exclusive partnership with AT&T by bringing Verizon into the mix. In Danger’s case, the “Pink Project” operated by Microsoft not only failed to achieve this intended goal, but failed in large part because the goal was simply a bad idea.

    After all, if exclusivity was inherently a bad thing, it wouldn’t be being used to successfully bring competing new models to the crowded smartphone market; Danger’s SideKick, Apple’s iPhone, RIM’s BlackBerry Storm and Palm’s Pre all gained their visibility in the market because of concerted marketing by their exclusive mobile partners. All have experienced some launch issues which would have been far worse and more complex to resolve had their hardware makers tried to simultaneously launch them on multiple carriers, as Microsoft planned to do with its Pink “Windows Phone,” using components borrowed the Danger acquisition.

    However, the Danger SideKick also has some significant differences from Apple’s iPhone business model. First, the iPhone is designed to plug into a computer running iTunes for initial setup, and while not entirely mandatory, it is designed to regularly sync with a desktop system. This process involves backing up all of the device’s application data to the users’ local computer, and allows the user to restore the device later. Apps running on the iPhone also run as local software and do not require an external service to be available. Most applications are designed to work offline, as a significant chunk of the iPhone platform is made of up of iPod touch users. Apps are only updated and/or removed by the user.

    The closest thing to Danger’s online services is Apple’s MobileMe, which is sold separately as an optional package of services that can sync, update, and push messages, contacts, calendars, bookmarks and other data to the phone, to associated desktop computers and for presentation via the web. After a problematic rollout plagued by slow performance and frequent outages occurred last year, Apple’s MobileMe has matured into a reliable service. Even so, an interruption in MobileMe services wouldn’t result in users being unable to use apps on their iPhones nor would it risk the loss of data on the device or backed up by the user’s copy of iTunes.

    The dark side of clouds

    More immediate types of cloud services take away users’ control in managing their own data. In addition to the Danger services for SideKick users, Microsoft also independently runs a MyPhone service for its Windows Mobile platform. It provides certain mobile and web publishing features (but not push messaging) comparable to Apple’s MobileMe.

    However, Microsoft’s MyPhone performs its backups of users’ phone data directly to the company’s servers, and not to the user’s local system. That means a Danger-like failure on the server end of MyPhone could easily result in unrecoverable data loss for Windows Mobile users, too.

         
  • Avatar

    Posted: 12 October 2009 01:45 PM #5

    willrob - 12 October 2009 12:52 AM

    The outage and data loss affects all SideKick customers of the Danger group Microsoft purchased in early 2008.

    Ya know…
    The group was named Danger. Kinda’ like tempting karma dontcha’ think?
    :-D

    Signature

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  • Posted: 12 October 2009 02:02 PM #6

    Microsoft is advertising Windows Phone. I saw one during football this weekend. They said it was coming soon to AT&T.

    You can read more at the Microsoft site: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsmobile/en-us/default.mspx

         
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    Posted: 12 October 2009 03:34 PM #7

    Microsoft (MSFT) Failure Destroys T-Mobile Customer Data

    T-MOBILE AND MICROSOFT/DANGER STATUS UPDATE ON SIDEKICK DATA DISRUPTION


    “Regrettably, based on Microsoft/Danger’s latest recovery assessment of their systems, we must now inform you that personal information stored on your device - such as contacts, calendar entries, to-do lists or photos - that is no longer on your Sidekick almost certainly has been lost as a result of a server failure at Microsoft/Danger. That said, our teams continue to work around-the-clock in hopes of discovering some way to recover this information. However, the likelihood of a successful outcome is extremely low.”

    http://forums.t-mobile.com/tmbl/?category.id=Sidekick

         
  • Posted: 12 October 2009 04:57 PM #8

    ctopher - 12 October 2009 05:02 PM

    Microsoft is advertising Windows Phone. I saw one during football this weekend. They said it was coming soon to AT&T.

    You can read more at the Microsoft site: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsmobile/en-us/default.mspx

    Engadget summarizes the confusion over this release: calling it a phone when it’s only a phone OS. Video at the link also.

         
  • Posted: 12 October 2009 11:16 PM #9

    artman1033 - 13 October 2009 01:11 AM

    More on Pink here!


    New update by Dan!


    The plot thickens.


    SUCH Schadenfreude!!!

    If anyone in the REAL world ever reads this, MSFT should tank!!!

    They didn’t read it today; Mr. Softie rose 17 cents (not centimeters to be safe here).