It seems as if Mac is only good for video/sound processing and web design

  • Posted: 13 January 2010 07:50 PM

    Hello everyone

    I’m considering to switch from PC to Mac, but Mac seems to be good only for people who mostly deal with graphic design, sound/video processing, picture post-processing and web design/development. Despite all the feedback about the benefits of Mac hardware and software that are perfectly integrated, I, as a normal computer user who needs a computer just for web browsing, checking email, watching movies and listening to music like most people, still wonder whether it is really worth all the time to learn a completely new operating system and all the Mac in general, and, of course, a considerable expense since a Mac is significantly more expensive than a PC.

    I’ll appreciate any help and opinion because on second thought, I see no advantage of a Mac over a PC…

         
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    Posted: 13 January 2010 08:36 PM #1

    this is a topic that has been covered, discussed, mulled over, and beaten to death on this and many other sites.  Rather than rehash all the old arguments, let me encapsulate them:

    1)  Macs have a tight integration between the hardware and software.  The problems associated with hardware conflicts and drivers on the cheap PC don’t happen on the Mac.

    2)  Comparably configured Macs and PCs (i.e. identical hardware) are VERY close in terms of price to one another.  Bargain PCs usually have slower RAM, smaller hard drives, lower quality screens, etc.  The Mac might be more, but generally the “Mac tax” is negligible and in some cases nonexistent.

    3)  Viruses and spyware.  No comparison here.  Macs don’t get them.

    4) Ease of use.  Macs are very user friendly. if you are comfortable on a PC, you really shouldn’t have much of an issue learning your way around a Mac.  Given the tasks you listed, you won’t have any at all.

    5)  iLife.  Out of the Box, the bundled iLife suite makes your Mac very useful for a wide variety of tasks.  The iLife suite is outstanding.

    That’s it in a nutshell.  Highest customer service rating in the computer industry is Apple.  PC Magazine’s best windows machine?  You guessed it- Apple.  If your time is worth something to you, you can really appreciate these things.  Remember, there is a big difference between price and COST.

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    Posted: 14 January 2010 12:45 PM #2

    I would add support.

    1. AppleCare. 3 years of hardware coverage from Apple AND you can call them for help.

    2. Sites such as http://myfirstmac.com/ to help you make the change.

    3. http://discussions.apple.com with thousands of fellow Mac users to help you.

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  • Posted: 14 January 2010 12:52 PM #3

    davebarnes - 14 January 2010 04:45 PM

    I would add support.

    1. AppleCare. 3 years of hardware coverage from Apple AND you can call them for help.

    2. Sites such as http://myfirstmac.com/ to help you make the change.

    3. http://discussions.apple.com with thousands of fellow Mac users to help you.

    Thanks for your replies.

    Dave - I couldn’t find any specific section on Apple discussions that deals with people who switch from PC to Mac. Could you point me to the right one please?

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2010 01:20 PM #4

    rfe777 - 13 January 2010 11:50 PM

    Hello everyone

    I’m considering to switch from PC to Mac, but Mac seems to be good only for people who mostly deal with graphic design, sound/video processing, picture post-processing and web design/development. Despite all the feedback about the benefits of Mac hardware and software that are perfectly integrated, I, as a normal computer user who needs a computer just for web browsing, checking email, watching movies and listening to music like most people, still wonder whether it is really worth all the time to learn a completely new operating system and all the Mac in general, and, of course, a considerable expense since a Mac is significantly more expensive than a PC.

    I’ll appreciate any help and opinion because on second thought, I see no advantage of a Mac over a PC…

    Hello, I my opinion you should first get to know what is inside a Mac… On the bottom of the beautifull Mac OS X is a FreeBSD Operating System that is a Unix OS. What are the advantages of the Unix OS? The most important one is the Viruses Subject… There are no known Viruses for the Mac OS X because Viruses do not usually attack Unix like OS because Unix as a very powerfull Security Model. I have installed an AV because AV does more than cleaning Viruses, they do something called Beahivor Analysis.

         
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    Posted: 14 January 2010 01:23 PM #5

    rfe777 - 14 January 2010 04:52 PM

    I couldn’t find any specific section on Apple discussions that deals with people who switch from PC to Mac. Could you point me to the right one please?

    1. This is another place for help: http://www.apple.com/findouthow/mac/

    2. There is not a specific Discussions area for switchers. You go the area that you think is most relevant to your problem/question and ask your question there.

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    Posted: 14 January 2010 01:26 PM #6

    I’ll throw my 2 cents in here.
    I’m a sysadmin for mostly Windows systems plus some Macs and Linux so I’ve seen all three sides of this. This is the answer I give my clients when they ask what computer they should get.
    Macs are a lot less hassle than Windows. There aren’t nearly as many patches and fixes and security scares, and all that.
    For Web, e-mail, movies, music, and such Macs work just as well if not better than Windows. The integration of the software simplifies many processes that are more of a hassle in Windows.
    However, If you are going to use your computer for work AND everything you will work with is Windows based then you may want to look at a Windows system. It’s a bit easier to interface with Windows systems, desktops Active Directory Domains and such if you are running Windows as well. Otherwise Macs will do whatever you want with a good deal less hassle.
    As acdc1174 mentioned above if you look at the specs in detail you will find that yes there are cheaper Windows systems but they are not really comparable. When you match systems with like speed, ports, features, and such the prices are pretty much the same.
    If you have a few Windows things you still need to do, emulation runs very well on the Mac. I use VirtualBox for testing and coding for Windows systems for work. Currently I’m testing Win7 for work in VirtualBox and it’s running very well, as fast as most desktops I’ve played with.

    I fix Windows systems at work. I spend the money on Macs for home because I don’t want to fiddle with the computer in my spare time.

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  • Posted: 14 January 2010 01:33 PM #7

    geoduck - 14 January 2010 05:26 PM

    I’ll throw my 2 cents in here.
    I’m a sysadmin for mostly Windows systems plus some Macs and Linux so I’ve seen all three sides of this. This is the answer I give my clients when they ask what computer they should get.
    Macs are a lot less hassle than Windows. There aren’t nearly as many patches and fixes and security scares, and all that.
    For Web, e-mail, movies, music, and such Macs work just as well if not better than Windows. The integration of the software simplifies many processes that are more of a hassle in Windows.
    However, If you are going to use your computer for work AND everything you will work with is Windows based then you may want to look at a Windows system. It’s a bit easier to interface with Windows systems, desktops Active Directory Domains and such if you are running Windows as well. Otherwise Macs will do whatever you want with a good deal less hassle.
    As acdc1174 mentioned above if you look at the specs in detail you will find that yes there are cheaper Windows systems but they are not really comparable. When you match systems with like speed, ports, features, and such the prices are pretty much the same.
    If you have a few Windows things you still need to do, emulation runs very well on the Mac. I use VirtualBox for testing and coding for Windows systems for work. Currently I’m testing Win7 for work in VirtualBox and it’s running very well, as fast as most desktops I’ve played with.

    I fix Windows systems at work. I spend the money on Macs for home because I don’t want to fiddle with the computer in my spare time.

    Hello, imagine a Company that as Macintosh Network instead of a Windows Network… That is true integration… I work in a Bank and I have Apple MBP integratde with Microsoft LDAP (Active Directory) using the Apple LDAP (Open Directory) and I am fully integrated with the Microsoft Network…

         
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    Posted: 14 January 2010 01:38 PM #8

    I have an entire site dedicated to helping switchers. Just go there and ask questions. Somebody will be more than happy to help.

    See my profile.

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    Mac switchers see my profile for switching help…

         
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    Posted: 14 January 2010 01:39 PM #9

    MacTech - 14 January 2010 05:33 PM

    Hello, imagine a Company that as Macintosh Network instead of a Windows Network… That is true integration… I work in a Bank and I have Apple MBP integratde with Microsoft LDAP (Active Directory) using the Apple LDAP (Open Directory) and I am fully integrated with the Microsoft Network…

    Sounds like you have a great setup there. We’re not quite as far along out here in the woods.

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    Posted: 14 January 2010 02:11 PM #10

    @MacMac… You might try straddling for awhile. If you can borrow a used Mac, give it a few weeks and decide if it’s for you. Start with a fresh install of Snow Leopard, iLife, and iWork (the Mac Box Set) if you can. You’re in for less than $200.

    Leo LaPorte, a famous radio tech guy, has Macs and PCs, uses both, and is a bit of an Apple fan (but not fanatic). He says that if you do creative work, the Mac is a no-brainer. If you play games, the PC is a no-brainer. Otherwise, with Windows 7, it’s a matter of individual taste. Straddle for a bit if you can afford that, then make your longer-term choice.

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2010 03:02 PM #11

    rfe777,

    Macintosh are not restricted or targeted for or to “art” designers. Is a myth, tear down, long time ago.

    Base on you personal computer usage, You’ll be more than please with any Mac.

    Mac OS X (Operating System) is easy to get to known.

    Important, Windows base games, wont run on Mac OS X. Is like trying to play an Xbox 360 title on a Playstation console.

    Mac price might be higher initially, but keep in mind premium Windows software cost extra and you “WILL” need them.

         
  • Posted: 14 January 2010 04:16 PM #12

    Let’s be honest here, Mac users pay for the convenience of having a fairly trouble-free (and virus-free), efficient, and elegant computing experience. I’ve recommended Macs to many friends and associates and the one thing that continues to come back at me is price. Macs usually cost more. Yes. True. I find that most people who ask me about a Mac don’t want to spend the money. Bottom line, they want the cheapest PC they can get. Some have regretted the decision while others can’t afford even a Mac mini or MacBook. $350 Windows laptops are very appealing, even after I explain all the drawbacks of such a machine (most of which have been explained in other posts).

    So, if you’re willing to pay more for a better operating environment, a more user friendly interface (although I’m told by my friends that Windows 2007 is very “Mac Like”), better software integration with iLife and iWorks (if you want to spend more money), and much less computing hassles (don’t fool yourself into thinking you won’t have any problems, you’ll be sorely disappointed), then certainly go with a Mac. You won’t regret it.

    I agree with a previous post about those in the working world using Windows. While Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac is a great office suite (a bit bulky in its use of resources, though), you will have compatibility issues with those in the Windows world - mostly on how pages layout. Text doesn’t measure out the same between operating systems, nor does the handling of symbols. You can use Parallels or VMware’s Fusion and install Windows on your Mac. Again, more money spent.

    The adage, “you get what you pay for,” holds true here. You get far more from a more “expensive” Mac than you do from a cheap PC. And if its a choice between similarly priced Macs/PCs - I would go with a Mac every time. I’ve been a Mac users since I switched in 2000. While I’ve had my share of headaches, it is a decision I’ve never regretted.

    [ Edited: 14 January 2010 04:21 PM by mjkphoto ]      
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    Posted: 14 January 2010 08:42 PM #13

    mjkphoto - 14 January 2010 08:16 PM

    You can use Parallels or VMware’s Fusion and install Windows on your Mac. Again, more money spent.

    FWIW VirtualBox is the consumer version of Sun’s server virtualization software. It’s quite robust, has done everything I’ve needed of it, and best of all is free.

    Though it sounds like you likely wouldn’t be needing virtualization for web, e-mail, movies, and such anyway.

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  • Posted: 14 January 2010 10:32 PM #14

    rfe777 - 14 January 2010 04:52 PM
    davebarnes - 14 January 2010 04:45 PM


    Dave - I couldn’t find any specific section on Apple discussions that deals with people who switch from PC to Mac. Could you point me to the right one please?

    I came back to work after doing a masters full time using a macbook. I must say that after all the perks this job provides, coming back to windows is a terrible experience. Opening an old box to discover how tapes looked in the past is fun, but having to use them again is not. This is my experience with PCs. They crash, they are power hungry, programs work in silos, need to leave laptop at work every now and then for virus check, etc. Clearly if a competitor was using macs I would easily weight that as an incentive for consideration… but haven’t come across that yet.

    As I relocated for the new job in Sydney I had to get a new driver license, I was then shocked to see the RTA (DMV for US) using macs and replying that they are very happy with them! Sure enough the license has a picture in case you want to add the ‘graphic advantage’ of the mac, but I guess this represented a tinny bit of the job for issuing a DL.
    Having said that, I used to take people to the apple store whenever they wanted to buy a computer, but I stopped doing that as once I saw how arrogant an apple fan could look at a department store. My assistant is just about to buy a laptop, my new approach is I recommended it once, here are the advantages and you are free to decide…

         
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    Posted: 14 January 2010 10:47 PM #15

    Let’s not forget the benefits of Apple designed hardware. For example, PC’s in general do not include FireWire ports - which you will find beneficial for external hard drives or video cameras. While you have a lot more choices with PC hardware, what gets left out of (or even what is considered an add-on) for basic configurations can be down right chintzy. For example, Dell’s low grade desktops do not include wireless, and from what I saw on their site the add-on they offer is the slower 802.11 g. All Macs - with the exception of the Mac Pro - comes with wireless built-in, and it’s the faster 802.11 n. And if you might be gearing towards a laptop, Macs exclusively feature an oversized track pad with multitouch controls, which is by far the best track pad on the market.

    Summing up, from a consumer perspective, as others have pointed out the software and operating system is designed for minimal hassle, and the hardware has everything you would need for what you described and basically ready to use, right out of the box.