It seems as if Mac is only good for video/sound processing and web design

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    Posted: 14 January 2010 11:37 PM #16

    My 2?....seems the Nuts and Bolts of software integration, support, cost vs. psychic ‘expense’ so let me give you - if you are still reading this far down into the string, a metaphorical reason to switch.
    Cars. What is cooler than a 60’s-70’s Jag XKE 2+2 12 cylinder, or any British-Leyland car - Triumph TR-6, Austin-Healy, MG etc…  very cool, popular cars they did what you needed AND were cool. Except that the 12 banger had to be tweaked almost daily to stay in time and the mechanical lifters!!.... ALL the B-L cars had Lucas “The Prince of Darkness” electronics. Maybe the heater would work. Maybe the lights would go on. Cool cars though.

    But what you’d get if it was an Apple “Car” product is not just state of the art industrial design - and I’m not just talking the ‘cool’ user interface part but ALL the design - internal and external, as you’d know if you ever had to do RAM in a PC compared to a G4-5 Mac tower…and it’s cool design backed up by the biggest reason to go Mac…...the user experience is like Butter. With an almost human intuition the Mac does what you think it should once you realize how easy preferences of all kinds are to set - and then realize that most all the apps you care about work seamlessly and very similarly the way you expect them to, and the Mac won’t balk if you want to watch a movie while iChatting or e-mailing or whatever, the Mac just plain works, it get’s out of your way so you can do whatever you want to do with virtually ZERO hassles,period. I’ve used Macs for 24 years yet I’m not a fanatic, there simply hasn’t been another OS/hardware combo that has been better, they come close and they have an edge here and there but at the end of the day nope, nothing is so easy and hassle-free as the Apple experience.

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  • Posted: 15 January 2010 01:25 AM #17

    rfe777 - 13 January 2010 11:50 PM

    Hello everyone

    I’m considering to switch from PC to Mac, but Mac seems to be good only for people who mostly deal with graphic design, sound/video processing, picture post-processing and web design/development. Despite all the feedback about the benefits of Mac hardware and software that are perfectly integrated, I, as a normal computer user who needs a computer just for web browsing, checking email, watching movies and listening to music like most people, still wonder whether it is really worth all the time to learn a completely new operating system and all the Mac in general, and, of course, a considerable expense since a Mac is significantly more expensive than a PC.

    I’ll appreciate any help and opinion because on second thought, I see no advantage of a Mac over a PC…

    The answer to your question is found in your needs and your wants. Macs are not more expensive. Apple is the US leader in retail sales for PCs costing $1,000 or more. By some estimates Apple owns 90% of that retail market. I doubt those buyers are wrong in their research and their choices. Feature for feature including the elegance, speed, security and ease-of-use of Mac OS X, Macs actually are less expensive than the competition. Consider the value of the iLife apps alone which are provided for free.

    But the issue is bigger than the one you address. Are you using an iPhone or an iPod touch? How about the desire for a comprehensive cloud-based service and storage solution such as MobileMe?

    Do you wish to simply spend money on a new PC or do you desire to investin the emerging computing platform of the new decade?

    If all you want is a cheap PC to watch a few movies, surf the Web and send some emails, than perhaps an Acer netbook is right for you.

    If you wish to begin investing in the best computing platform on the planet that provides full integration between handheld devices, laptops and desktops and is designed with productive users in mind, I suggest investing in a Mac.

         
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    Posted: 15 January 2010 09:31 PM #18

    I don’t know why people think learning the Mac OS is a scary and complicated thing?  Honestly, you’ll find it more familiar than you think.  In fact, most actions you do are the same on PC and Mac with the exception of the name of the key you use (i.e. command vs control).  Perhaps the biggest change is remembering to quit an application rather than closing all the windows.

    Then again, the cost of a Mac to simply browse the internet may not be worth it to some.  However, the lack of fear browsing the net is a major bonus and probably worth the investment itself, not to mention the stability and quality of the OS (yes, I have both PC and Mac machines here).

    Don’t let the transition phase alone keep you from making the switch.  It really isn’t as bad as it may seem.  I switched several years ago (cold turkey, btw) and have never looked back for my main computing needs.

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  • Posted: 16 January 2010 03:37 AM #19

    I switched from XP to OS X about two years ago. The only thing I got was better hardware.  Apple as a company is little better than Dell.
    I have Apple Care on speed dial. It’s been not much fun. OS X 10.5.x (Leopard) has been as unstable as XP.
    -Expect to have to erase the hard drive and install the OS and all your apps every 12-18 months, just like Windows.
    -Expect to have to restart your machine every day or so to get a stable system. 
    -Expect Apple to shift blame for problems on 3rd parties.

    So, if you want better hardware and have no other expectation for a better experience than in the PC world, switch.  Consider the hassle of having to learn a whole ‘nother set of diagnostic tools and troubleshooting methods. You’ll need them.
    I’ve had to roll back to some Windows applications (Parallels via Boot Camp) because I just could not get them working on OS X.
    I’ve logged many of my interactions with Apple here [Corrected]: http://www.cupcakewalk.com/switchingtoamac/. It’s also in my profile.

    [ Edited: 16 January 2010 04:18 PM by cupcake ]      
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    Posted: 16 January 2010 03:51 AM #20

    cupcake - 16 January 2010 07:37 AM

    I switched from XP to OS X about two years ago. The only thing I got was better hardware.  Apple as a company is little better than Dell.
    I have Apple Care on speed dial. It’s been not much fun. OS X 10.5.x (Leopard) has been as unstable as XP.
    -Expect to have to erase the hard drive and install the OS and all your apps every 12-18 months, just like Windows.
    -Expect to have to restart your machine every day or so to get a stable system. 
    -Expect Apple to shift blame for problems on 3rd parties.

    So, if you want better hardware and have no other expectation for a better experience than in the PC world, switch.  Consider the hassle of having to learn a whole ‘nother set of diagnostic tools and troubleshooting methods. You’ll need them.
    I’ve had to roll back to some Windows applications (Parallels via Boot Camp) because I just could not get them working on OS X.
    I’ve logged many of my interactions with Apple here: http://www.switchingtoamac.com. It’s also in my profile.


    There’s something seriously wrong with your machine if you need to re-install the OS and your apps every year or so.  I’ve never, ever, had to re-install the OS on any of my Macs in 10 years or so of using them.  You either have a defective machine or something you’re doing is corrupting your software.  Are Macs perfect?  No, of course not but they certainly don’t need annual refreshers.

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  • Posted: 16 January 2010 12:07 PM #21

    celticmagick - 16 January 2010 07:51 AM
    cupcake - 16 January 2010 07:37 AM

    -Expect to have to erase the hard drive and install the OS and all your apps every 12-18 months, just like Windows.
    -Expect to have to restart your machine every day or so to get a stable system.


    There’s something seriously wrong with your machine if you need to re-install the OS and your apps every year or so.  I’ve never, ever, had to re-install the OS on any of my Macs in 10 years or so of using them.  You either have a defective machine or something you’re doing is corrupting your software.  Are Macs perfect?  No, of course not but they certainly don’t need annual refreshers.

    Apple replaced my iMac after 9 months and two erase and installs. About an unreliable year later, erase and install with no system data or programs transferred. It’s been in the Apple store 3+ times.
    On both systems, I have had to hit the power button at least once a month to gain control of my machine. I suspect that’s corrupting stuff, but what options do I have when Force Quit won’t even launch? I need my computer for work, so I can’t really let it sit, locked up, for 1/2 an hour to “see what it does.” I hate the inconvenience and delays of owning a Mac, but I have so much money invested in hardware…
    Although I feel a little stupid for doing so, I’m still holding hope that things might get better.

         
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    Posted: 16 January 2010 12:31 PM #22

    cupcake - 16 January 2010 07:37 AM

    I’ve logged many of my interactions with Apple here: http://www.switchingtoamac.com. It’s also in my profile.

    I can find absolutely nothing on the link provided that talks about anything macintosh related, which makes me doubt the veracity of the rest of the claims stated here. The site appears to be a news aggregator. The “archives” links point to financialplannercertification.com and talalay-latex-mattress.com. Searching from the provided search bar for “Apple” does a Google search. The “archives’ also only date as far back as November 2009.

    The claims stated by “cupcake” are by no means the norm, if they are true at all. I have my doubts based upon the site link provided.

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    Posted: 16 January 2010 01:20 PM #23

    Intruder - 16 January 2010 04:31 PM

    The claims stated by “cupcake” are by no means the norm, if they are true at all. I have my doubts based upon the site link provided.

    Those claims do sound pretty far fetched. Not at all dissimilar to a former anti-Apple coworker of mine who claimed he walked into an Apple store and saw customers lined up to the door with broken iPods who were in for service.

         
  • Posted: 16 January 2010 01:26 PM #24

    xmattingly - 16 January 2010 05:20 PM
    Intruder - 16 January 2010 04:31 PM

    The claims stated by “cupcake” are by no means the norm, if they are true at all. I have my doubts based upon the site link provided.

    Those claims do sound pretty far fetched. Not at all dissimilar to a former anti-Apple coworker of mine who claimed he walked into an Apple store and saw customers lined up to the door with broken iPods who were in for service.

    My mistake. Here’s my blog: http://www.cupcakewalk.com/switchingtoamac/. Fixed in my profile too. It was late.
    [Can you tell I’m getting used to the new browser feature? I go in to the address bar and start typing Switching to a Mac. It’s the first hit.]

    [ Edited: 16 January 2010 01:28 PM by cupcake ]      
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    Posted: 16 January 2010 02:03 PM #25

    Again, these reports are not typical.

    Looking at your history, I’ve tried to recreate a few (such as the no bullets in Mail) and cannot. It seems to work as expected. Others (such as the OS locking up and the machine not wanting to shut down), again are not common failures. I currently have 6 machines in my house, running everything from 10.4 to 10.6 and none exhibit these traits.

    Do you happen to run an HP printer or all-in-one? Also, broken fonts can cause really weird things (as can removing fonts that are necessary for the OS).

    Also, the tech that said to run permissions repair weekly must have been on something. That is not (and never has been) a requirement for the OS.

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    Posted: 16 January 2010 03:16 PM #26

    Yeah, cupcake’s blog appears to be all documentation and little detail; I can’t even make sense of half of the entries.

    For example, the 10/31/08 entry:

    “1. The design of the Apple Store?s Genius Bar is awful.”
    Okay, why is that?

    2. Now I understand why businesses don?t choose Mac. I keep losing billing hours.
    Here is an arbitrary complaint if I ever heard one. a) Businesses don’t choose Macs for a variety of reasons, none having anything to do with the Apple Store Genius Bar, and b) have you ever heard of making an appointment?

    Could be that he’s one of those rare people who just always has a thundercloud over his head, and nothing will work right no matter what. On the other hand, I find it extremely hard to buy into complaints from a person whose blog is premeditated on nothing but complaints. And highly dubious ones, at that.

         
  • Posted: 16 January 2010 04:14 PM #27

    xmattingly - 16 January 2010 07:16 PM

    Yeah, cupcake’s blog appears to be all documentation and little detail; I can’t even make sense of half of the entries.

    For example, the 10/31/08 entry:

    “1. The design of the Apple Store?s Genius Bar is awful.”
    Okay, why is that?

    2. Now I understand why businesses don?t choose Mac. I keep losing billing hours.
    Here is an arbitrary complaint if I ever heard one. a) Businesses don’t choose Macs for a variety of reasons, none having anything to do with the Apple Store Genius Bar, and b) have you ever heard of making an appointment?

    Could be that he’s one of those rare people who just always has a thundercloud over his head, and nothing will work right no matter what. On the other hand, I find it extremely hard to buy into complaints from a person whose blog is premeditated on nothing but complaints. And highly dubious ones, at that.

    The reason I numbered my items is to indicate that I’m moving on to another topic.

    1. The design of the Genius Bar is awful because it forces me to look at someone who has flying graphics behind their head. It’s very distracting. Try to be anywhere in an Apple store that doesn’t have some thing that’s flying around or flashing. There are screens everywhere with lots of activity. Every Genius Bar that I have been in is in a very noisy environment. Very distracting. Parking and my local Genius Bar are not close. I make appointments at the Genius Bar. Once the head Genius missed my 8AM appointment. I’d gone through the same rainy day bad traffic as he had to. I was on time. He was not there when I left at 8:30.
    2. Before I became a Mac user who gets his income from his Mac, I could never understand why businesses didn’t switch. Now that I’ve spent hours and hours on the phone trying to figure out what’s wrong with my iMac, I think I know. Apple has been little help in identifying the root problem. I know that I can hit the power button to regain control. I want to know what is causing the problem. It’s a proprietary, closed system. I guess that mean they don’t need diagnostic tools that can suss out what the real problem is. Problem going on for a long time? Erase and install, just like XP.

    I’ll be the first to admit I’ve had an atypical experience. I just wish somebody had told me that it’s not going to be significantly different than owning a Lenovo, Toshiba, Dell or Sony, or running XP.
    I sighed relief when I switched, thankful that I’d never have to deal with Dell again. I had high expectations about Apple and Macs. All my positive expectations about Apple have been proven I was misinformed, except that the hardware is better built. And that’s after having a hard drive fail on my first iMac. I know hard drives fail and do not hold that against Apple’s hardware reputation.
    However, it took me months of telling them that my hard drive was failing and having it actually stop working for good while on the phone with tier two Apple Care before they took any action on it. That was a waste of my time (on the phone and taking the machine in to the Genius Bar), aggravating, and expensive.

    I created my blog as an Apple-proof way to keep notes about my support calls. When my Mac was not working, I found it difficult to provide a case number stored on the non-working iMac. I created it for my own reference so I could get case info by firing up my old Dell laptop or looking on my phone. I offered it as documentation of what a hassle it’s been. You want to find faults with my blog, go ahead. I’m a real person who has had real, ongoing problems switching to a Mac. Others should know that switching is not all that it’s cracked up to be.

         
  • Posted: 16 January 2010 04:20 PM #28

    Intruder - 16 January 2010 06:03 PM

    Again, these reports are not typical.
    ...
    Do you happen to run an HP printer or all-in-one? ...

    No HP hardware. Learned my lessons there. How do I identify misbehaving fonts?

         
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    Posted: 16 January 2010 06:32 PM #29

    cupcake - 16 January 2010 08:14 PM

    The design of the Genius Bar is awful because…there are screens everywhere with lots of activity. Every Genius Bar that I have been in is in a very noisy environment. Very distracting.

    I’ll be the first to admit I’ve had an atypical experience…I created my blog as an Apple-proof way to keep notes about my support calls.

    Well, your issue with the Genius Bar sounds more of a personal discrepancy than a technical one. True that Apple stores are noisy in general; that’s to be expected of a place that’s typically crowded, especially in a small-ish retail space. I’ve sat at the Genius Bar a couple of times myself, and personally I don’t find the noise or wall graphics distracting. Apple always send a follow-up email after you’ve visited asking you to rate your experience, so if your Genius was late that would have been your best opportunity to let them know about it.

    Again, the reasons for businesses not widely adopting Macs go beyond yours. A lot of it is tied to software/platform; Office and Microsoft Exchange Server, for example. There is that ongoing perception that Apple products cost more (of course they always disregard the total cost of ownership), and I suspect - to a large degree, that corporate network admin’s rally against OS X, because they frankly don’t want to be out of a job.

    I don’t know, man. A blog seems like a lot of extra effort to track support cases… being that it includes a lot of non-technical/opinions, I have to stand by my original assessment. I’ve seen Mac computers that were duds, but the enormity of issues that you say you’re having goes far beyond that, so I wish you the best of luck.

    As far as font issues, you can usually tell when something is haywire when certain apps display text info incorrectly. For example, I’ve had conflicts from installing an Adobe Postscript version of Helvetica, that causes the System’s Helvetica Bold to display incorrectly on say, iCal or the Dashboard calendar. Another way to weed them out is by using the tools that your OS comes with.

         
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    Posted: 16 January 2010 06:40 PM #30

    It might be helpful to understand what you do have attached to the computer and what apps and such you use.

    Often times the OS seems to lock up because some piece of equipment is having trouble communicating with its software (why I asked about HP).

    I’m not (now) doubting that you are experiencing troubles (you can understand why I had doubts based on the first link you gave). But to have the same troubles on multiple machines points more towards a workflow/external hardware issue than the machines themselves.

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