Market Cap Countdown:  AAPL vs MSFT

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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:05 PM #16

    Maybe we have calculated wrong because it’s being reported to have just happened!!!!!  Apple 242bn Microsoft 239bn

    edit:  MS shares just dropped 2.5% on earnings putting Apple market-cap above MS

    [ Edited: 22 April 2010 05:15 PM by macglenn ]

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    The study of money, above all other fields in economics, is one in which complexity is used to disguise truth or to evade truth, not to reveal it. The process by which banks create money is so simple the mind is repelled.

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:15 PM #17

    macglenn - 22 April 2010 08:05 PM

    Maybe we have calculated wrong because it’s being reported to have just happened!!!!!  Apple 242bn Microsoft 239bn

    I still see MSFT reported as having a $275B Market Cap

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:18 PM #18

    LINK

    Yes, they seem to have made an error.

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    The study of money, above all other fields in economics, is one in which complexity is used to disguise truth or to evade truth, not to reveal it. The process by which banks create money is so simple the mind is repelled.

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:19 PM #19

    Boom! And one is still heading higher and one is headed by Steve Balmer.

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    news, backstory, analysis and opinion for investors in AAPL at my blog relentless focus

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:30 PM #20

    relentlessFocus - 22 April 2010 08:19 PM

    Boom! And one is still heading higher and one is headed by Steve Balmer.

    Well bad info picked up on one site and repeated at a WSJ site and WSJ not checking their source and me not checking on all things digital reporting… I’ll be spinning my prayer wheel all evening

    [ Edited: 22 April 2010 05:33 PM by relentlessFocus ]

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    news, backstory, analysis and opinion for investors in AAPL at my blog relentless focus

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:33 PM #21

    relentlessFocus - 22 April 2010 08:30 PM
    relentlessFocus - 22 April 2010 08:19 PM

    Boom! And one is still heading higher and one is headed by Steve Balmer.

    Well bad info picked up on one site and repeated at a WSJ site and WSJ not checking their source and me not checking on all things digital reporting… I’ll be spinning my prayer wheel all evening

    And now All Things Digital have removed their page. Isn’t it nice to live in the information age?

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    news, backstory, analysis and opinion for investors in AAPL at my blog relentless focus

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:35 PM #22

    Indeed, no need to apologize or print a retraction,  The story never existed.

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    The study of money, above all other fields in economics, is one in which complexity is used to disguise truth or to evade truth, not to reveal it. The process by which banks create money is so simple the mind is repelled.

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:42 PM #23

    It might be faster than expected. MSFT announced their earnings. I guess someone wasn’t happy with something. MSFT down 4.5% in AH trading.

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:51 PM #24

    relentlessFocus - 22 April 2010 08:33 PM
    relentlessFocus - 22 April 2010 08:30 PM
    relentlessFocus - 22 April 2010 08:19 PM

    Boom! And one is still heading higher and one is headed by Steve Balmer.

    Well bad info picked up on one site and repeated at a WSJ site and WSJ not checking their source and me not checking on all things digital reporting… I’ll be spinning my prayer wheel all evening

    And now All Things Digital have removed their page. Isn’t it nice to live in the information age?

    And now the ATD page is showing a correction and while not taking the blame (or spinning their prayer wheel) they’re saying “we don’t understand what happened… but…”

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    news, backstory, analysis and opinion for investors in AAPL at my blog relentless focus

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 05:52 PM #25

    according to this piece at marketwatch S&P are not basing it on the full market cap. I dont fully understand it but whatever we all know its eventually gonna happen.
    LINK

    Apple passes Microsoft for second place in S&P 500
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    SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch)—Apple Inc. (AAPL 265.40, -1.07, -0.40%)  became the second-largest company, in terms of market capitalization, on the S&P 500 (SPX 1,209, +2.74, +0.23%)  Thursday, trailing only Exxon Mobil (XOM 68.50, -0.06, -0.09%) , according to Standard & Poor’s index services unit. The S&P 500 is float-adjusted, so it doesn’t use the full market basis for Microsoft. Apple’s float-adjusted market cap reached $241.5 billion, surpassing Microsoft Corp.‘s (MSFT 29.91, -1.48, -4.72%)  index market value of $239.5 billion, said Standard & Poor’s. Exxon still remains in the top spot on the S&P 500 with a market cap of more than $300 billion, said S&P. (Updates to correct Apple market capitalization and clarifies Standard & Poor’s ranking.)

    [ Edited: 22 April 2010 06:21 PM by $Billyall ]      
  • Posted: 22 April 2010 06:17 PM #26

    The Wall Street Journal is reporting that “Apple Edges Out Microsoft as #2 in S&P 500”.

    Here’s a link

    Some text from the article:

    “It?s official, says Howard Silverblatt, the Standard & Poor?s analyst who serves as a sort of high priest of all things S&P 500. He sent out a note moments ago:

    It came right down to the trade, but AAPL has an index market value of $241,534 million and MSFT has a market value of $239,515 million ? AAPL is #2. What a Job”.

    Here’s a clarifying statement from TUAW:

    “Standard & Poor’s index is “float adjusted market capitalization weighted” (gesundheit!), meaning that it is tracking the smaller number of shares actually available for public purchase, as opposed to the larger number tied up in instruments such as employee options.”

    [ Edited: 22 April 2010 06:36 PM by Francisco Geraci ]      
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 06:37 PM #27

    deleted, redundant

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    The study of money, above all other fields in economics, is one in which complexity is used to disguise truth or to evade truth, not to reveal it. The process by which banks create money is so simple the mind is repelled.

         
  • Posted: 22 April 2010 06:40 PM #28

    What I find interesting is how Gates was able to keep so much of the Microsoft market cap for himself.  I wonder who became rich from AAPL’s rise from near death to today?  Jobs?  Did anyone become a billionaire off of AAPL’s rise since 1996, other than Mace, of course? wink

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    Off again, on again…

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 06:46 PM #29

    S&P 500

    Weighting

    The index has traditionally been market-value weighted; that is, movements in the prices of stocks with higher market capitalizations (the share price times the number of shares outstanding) have a greater effect on the index than companies with smaller market caps.
    The index is now float weighted. That is, Standard & Poor’s now calculates the market caps relevant to the index using only the number of shares (called “float”) available for public trading. This transition was made in two steps, the first on March 18, 2005 and the second on September 16, 2005.

    Capitalization-weighted index

    Traditionally, capitalization-weighted indices in the United States tended to have a full weighting, i.e., all outstanding shares were included; overseas, because partial government ownership of large companies was more common, so-called float-weighted indexing has been the norm for many non-U.S. indices. Recently, many of the U.S. indices, such as the S&P 500, have been changed to a float-adjusted weighting which makes their calculation more consistent with non-U.S. indices.
    A free float adjustment factor is introduced in calculations for the index. This represents the proportion of shares that is free floated as a percentage of issued shares and then is rounded to the nearest multiple of 5% for calculation purposes. To find the free-float capitalization of a company, first find its market cap (number of outstanding shares x share price) then multiply its free-float factor. The free-float method, therefore, does not include restricted stocks, such as those held by company insiders.

         
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    Posted: 22 April 2010 07:13 PM #30

    Thanks deagol for the explanation 8)