Coverage of the Gulf Oil Spill

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    Posted: 11 May 2010 02:57 PM #31

    Much more information is just coming out now.  http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/gas_surge_shut_well_just_weeks.html

    LIVE COVERAGE TODAY of the oil hearings   http://www.cnn.com/video/flashLive/live.html?stream=4

    [ Edited: 11 May 2010 04:49 PM by zulu ]      
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    Posted: 12 May 2010 12:47 AM #32

    When you have elected officials telling corporations, if you don’t do as we say, we will put you out of business. The more I read the more it seems to me that big brother is getting out in front of this and making sure nobody questions whether the DOI inspectors did their job.

    The flow rate has to be a SWAG.

    Tan, Haliburton is claiming they built to BP’s spec’s. Like I said last week, some poor bastard pouring the concrete will end up being blamed. You know the story, disgruntled employee, yada, yada ,yada.

    The liability to clean the mess up clearly lies with BP, but I think Transocean may have pushed the envelope to get that billion dollar rig online. The story of the concrete mix is going to be the final straw.

    I have a couple more weeks before I go to Panama City Beach, man I hope those beautiful beaches are not ruined. :innocent:

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    Posted: 12 May 2010 03:22 PM #33

    Speaking of flow rate, that is one of the great mysteries of this event.

    Initial estimates were about 1,000 bpd. Media reports keep on quoting the 5,000 bpd estimate attributed to the Coast Guard, which is not the source professionals typically look toward for well data. As a research petroleum geologist, my reaction to these numbers is that nobody knows the flow rate - or if they do know, they’re not publicizing the data. One helpful factor is that the crude appears to be light, and so a large portion of the oil is evaporating. Thus far, evaporation is combining with favorable weather and currents to help limit the coastal impact. Evaporation helped save Norway from the Ekofisk Bravo blowout in the 1970s.

    One factor that seems to be overlooked is that the flow rate of conventional wells typically declines.

    So, if the rate was 5,000 bpd at the time of the original reports, it should be lower today and will continue to decrease. Of course, we do not know the rate of decline, which may be the ultimate determinant of environmental impact should capping the blowout remain problematic for an extended period.

         
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    Posted: 12 May 2010 04:14 PM #34

    Sex, lies and oil spills

    Points the finger directly at the staffing of the dept. of MMS with Oil cronies during the previous admin.

    BTW, Rush saying that environmental whackos might have blown up the rig is the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard. Sure, these people who want to protect the coastlines/ocean and are going to create a disaster of epic proportions. Anything to keep the eye off the ball of Bush-Cheney/BP/Haliburton/Transocean.

    Also, BP told congress:

    BP officials said the spill rate could be as much as 60,000 barrels (2.5 million gallons) a day ? far above the 5,000-barrel daily rate estimated up to now. At the higher rate of flow, the spill would surpass the amount leaked from the Exxon Valdez in a bit more than four days. That 1989 spill dumped 10.8 million gallons into Prince William Sound

         
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    Posted: 12 May 2010 05:21 PM #35

    ChasMac77 - 12 May 2010 07:14 PM

    Sex, lies and oil spills

    Points the finger directly at the staffing of the dept. of MMS with Oil cronies during the previous admin.

    BTW, Rush saying that environmental whackos might have blown up the rig is the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard. Sure, these people who want to protect the coastlines/ocean and are going to create a disaster of epic proportions. Anything to keep the eye off the ball of Bush-Cheney/BP/Haliburton/Transocean.

    Also, BP told congress:

    BP officials said the spill rate could be as much as 60,000 barrels (2.5 million gallons) a day ? far above the 5,000-barrel daily rate estimated up to now. At the higher rate of flow, the spill would surpass the amount leaked from the Exxon Valdez in a bit more than four days. That 1989 spill dumped 10.8 million gallons into Prince William Sound

    I bet you listen to rush every day. LOL  As for your article,trying to figure out a way to blame Bush is amusing. Get one thing in your head. Your dictator has been in power for a year and a half and your party has controlled Congress since 2006. If this was such a pressing issue, why haven’t your people done anything? Just a couple of weeks ago Obama was touting offshore drilling.

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  • Posted: 12 May 2010 05:53 PM #36

    Let’s keep our eye on the ball. This was an industrial accident. This blame crap isn’t for the majority of us. Let the world’s lawyers work it out. At least they will be off our backs for a while and do something productive. Thinking people know when you do anything, something is likely to go wrong. I’m thinking that trains, planes, and automobiles sometimes don’t make their destinations. And we still line up to get where we’re going. This is a mess, but we will not stop using oil because we spilled some.

         
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    Posted: 12 May 2010 06:33 PM #37

    Cheney completely left halliburton in 2000, so I’m not sure how halliburton allegedly doing something wrong has anything to do with Cheney.

    Drilling from this rig started this year. They were exempted from environmental impact studies April of last year. So I’m not sure how this has anything to do with the previous administration at all.

    I realize that saying “yeah but Bush” is all the rage these days, but the current administration will have to take ownership sometime.

    //just sayin’

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    Posted: 12 May 2010 07:01 PM #38

    ChasMac77 - 12 May 2010 07:14 PM

    Also, BP told congress:

    BP officials said the spill rate could be as much as 60,000 barrels (2.5 million gallons) a day ? far above the 5,000-barrel daily rate estimated up to now. At the higher rate of flow, the spill would surpass the amount leaked from the Exxon Valdez in a bit more than four days. That 1989 spill dumped 10.8 million gallons into Prince William Sound

    “Could be as much as” sounds like an upper limit based on known tubing diameter and estimated pressure differential between the reservoir and sea bed. It also sounds like BP has not been able to get any meaningful handle on actual flow rates.

         
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    Posted: 12 May 2010 07:17 PM #39

    I teach leadership for a living. Leadership competency #1 is “accountability & responsibility”. Little wonder there is a USCG officer (Admiral Allen) in charge of administering the cleanup.  The very first thing I learned when I put on the uniform was “no excuses sir!”  If I had a hand in it, then it is MY problem until it gets fixed.  All three potentially culpable parties should take 100% of the blame until the problem is solved.  Yes, the markets might hammer them short term. But look at Tylenol, ValueJet, Valdez, Toyota, spinach recall, mad cow, pet food, etc situations for examples of how strong up front accountability/responsibility contrasts with finger pointing. Unfortunately, we don’t have LEADERS in the country anymore.  Well, not many, anyway. Thankfully there are about 300 new ones produced for the officer ranks and 4000+ for the enlisted ranks by the Coast Guard each year.

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    Posted: 12 May 2010 10:17 PM #40

    rezonate - 12 May 2010 10:17 PM

    I teach leadership for a living. Leadership competency #1 is “accountability & responsibility”. Little wonder there is a USCG officer (Admiral Allen) in charge of administering the cleanup.  The very first thing I learned when I put on the uniform was “no excuses sir!”  If I had a hand in it, then it is MY problem until it gets fixed.  All three potentially culpable parties should take 100% of the blame until the problem is solved.  Yes, the markets might hammer them short term. But look at Tylenol, ValueJet, Valdez, Toyota, spinach recall, mad cow, pet food, etc situations for examples of how strong up front accountability/responsibility contrasts with finger pointing. Unfortunately, we don’t have LEADERS in the country anymore.  Well, not many, anyway. Thankfully there are about 300 new ones produced for the officer ranks and 4000+ for the enlisted ranks by the Coast Guard each year.


    Well said, and thank you for your service. Your influence on the future is immeasurable.

     

    :apple:

         
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    Posted: 14 May 2010 10:20 PM #41

    The facts seem a little muddy.  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704414504575244812908538510.html?ru=yahoo&mod=yahoo_hs

         
  • Posted: 16 May 2010 07:25 PM #42

    BP claims a breakthrough in capturing the oil with a mile-long funnel.  The most recent estimate is that the well is leaking 5,000 barrels a day.  See here for more details

         
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    Posted: 16 May 2010 10:29 PM #43

    Crews will slowly ramp up how much oil the tube collects over the next few days. They need to move slowly because they don’t want too much frigid seawater entering the pipe, which could combine with gases to form the same ice-like crystals that doomed the previous containment effort. 

    The first chance to choke off the flow for good should come in about a week. Engineers plan to shoot heavy mud into the crippled blowout preventer on top of the well, then permanently entomb the leak in concrete. If that doesn’t work, crews also can shoot golf balls and knotted rope into the nooks and crannies of the device to plug it, Wells said.

    http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/mile-long_tube_sucking_oil_awa.html

    Earlier reports were later modified:  “BP said early Sunday afternoon that the mile-long tube is working, drawing most of the leaking oil to the tanker from the Gulf seafloor.”
    http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/bp_says_mile-long_tube_working.html

    [ Edited: 16 May 2010 10:32 PM by zulu ]      
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    Posted: 18 May 2010 04:44 PM #44

    Graphic shows how leaking oil well could be plugged by ‘top kill’ method

    http://www.nola.com/news/gulf-oil-spill/index.ssf/2010/05/graphic_shows_how_leaking_oil.html

    Early on while drilling the second well (the one that eventually blew up) an accident damaged part of the blowout preventer (BOP). According to Williams, they were conducting a routine test of the annular, a ring of rubber that closes around the well at the top of the BOP stack. While the annular was closed, thus closing off the well, a driller accidentally pushed a joystick, which pulled the pipe casing up through the rubber seal at very high pressure. A short time later, after drilling had resumed, pieces of rubber began coming up from the bottom of the well. A drilling supervisor told Williams that the rubber debris was “no big deal”.

    No big deal indeed. Especially when you’re collecting insurance payments to cover your losses while the Gulf of Mexico becomes a dead oil slick.
    http://www.mslitigationreview.com/08

    [ Edited: 18 May 2010 04:57 PM by zulu ]      
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    Posted: 20 May 2010 09:59 AM #45

    From everything that I’m reading and seeing, the BP disaster is much worse than anyone is letting on. Some experts are now estimating that the spill is closer to 100,000 BPD vs. the 5,000 that has been the standard talking point. When BP starts kicking CBS journalists off of public beaches, won’t share video, says that the leak is “just a drop in the ocean” then we have a problem.

    So, IMO this is going to cause some major economic problems down the road. Massive aid to Gulf States, unemployment will jump, more turmoil that isn’t good for the market. Have we ever had a disaster where Gov./Big Business said that things were worse than they actually were? It’s always “this is worse than we originally thought - whoops”.

    That being said, if this does play out like I think it might, how to do you A.) protect yourself B.) take advantage it - shorts? Buys?

    I don’t want to turn this into a political discussion. Trust me, I’m pretty pissed at the way this is being handled by the current admin. I think they are way too concerned about our fragile economy and are trying to let things out in dribbles and drabs.