Why The iPhone Is Better Than Andriod

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:19 PM #16

    Sir Harry Flashman - 10 May 2010 02:58 PM
    rattyuk - 08 May 2010 11:47 PM

    The barber was using an Instinct. He said he used to have an iPhone but found it “too complicated”. He didn’t need the “email features” that the iPhone had. It sounded to me like a salesman had done his job.

    So yes we know that the iPhone is a great product. It is a game changer. The question is will it be another death by a thousand cuts with salesmen desperate to make their cut down-selling something which is just “good enough”?

    I wonder if the salesman got a commission for selling an Instinct.

    What phone is he using now?  If it is a dumb phone then he can’t afford the data plan and is giving excuses why he doesn’t need the iPhone.  I don’t use the email on the iPhone at all.

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  • Posted: 10 May 2010 01:20 PM #17

    NeXTLoop - 10 May 2010 03:03 PM

    This is one of the reasons that I personally believe Apple HAS to release an iPhone on Verizon ASAP.

    I totally agree. If Apple wants to stay on top of this smartphone business - and everything else suggests that they do, then they MUST get the next iPhone on Verizon in the fall at the very latest. There’s really no two ways about it.

    I’ve heard a lot of analysts and pundits explain how it is beneficial for Apple to stay exclusively on AT&T, but I really can’t think of any advantages that can beat 90 million new customers lusting after the iPhone!? Not to mention the sales potential in New York and San Francisco when they can actually use an iPhone for telephone calls!

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  • Posted: 10 May 2010 01:24 PM #18

    Roman - 10 May 2010 03:55 PM
    sleepygeek - 10 May 2010 03:36 PM

    Android’s achilles heel is that it can’t carry its installed base forwards . . .

    sg - can you elaborate?

    Android devices are all different. There is no recognisable (to ordinary folk) UI consistency, no central, user friendly OS updating; it’s down to the handset maker and carrier to offer OS updates, and there’s no reason to, because they don’t own the customer relationship.  So only a tiny fraction of the installed base will ever be on the latest OS version. I understand the user even has to discover and explicitly install app updates individually, whereas iPhone encourages one-click mass updating without any searching. Android is replicating the MS Windows for PC’s situation where the PC maker doesn’t have a long term customer relationship. What did HP just decide about its Windows 7 tablet, which has all those good Android properties of being more powerful and fuller featured than iPad, more flexible, part of a huge range of products from many manufacturers with different features, yet all capable of running the same applications. How could such advantages not completely overwhelm iPad? Clearly HP has recently figured it out, even if Bosco hasn’t yet. In that situation, the “manufacturer” is just a merchant buying in a feature set and branding it, the same as WalMart.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:28 PM #19

    Ummm, pats… You’re the one who said “think of the average consumer” and saying that they wouldn’t be able to figure Android out. I beg to differ. I have anecdotal evidence to back up my opinion. I have a friend who got a Droid a few months ago. She has computer skills comparable to my Mom. We’re not talking geeks. We’re talking smart people who use applications for their fields and were both late adopters in the 1990s. She does far more with her Droid than my Mom does with her 3GS.

    Droid interface is different from iPhone, not just visually, but how it flows. Being used to iPhone, it took me a couple hours with my N1 to figure out how liberating the multitasking and notification systems were. It took me a couple days for it to seem natural. And now, when I pick up my 3GS (rarely), it seems so pedestrian to me.

    So, no, I’m not calling you stupid, and I’m just laughing at what you told me to do. Thanks for your service and all. I was an AF brat in my early childhood, so I appreciate it greatly. But I think if you can’t find a better competitive advantage for iPhone, you’re gonna wind up disappointed that more and more regular people in the coming year don’t either. That’s all.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:30 PM #20

    sg - thanks for the reply.

    I agree with most of what you’re saying, but there’s also always going to be a “we need more choice” crowd (about which I’m not worried), and those who settle for “Good Enough” once and then take years to change once they get used to a particular device (which could be Android if they’re glued to Verizon currently). However, as you pointed out before, Apple may not want to go after that segment because it could turn out more costly to do so than any additional benefit. I continue believe that exclusivity is the biggest hurdle for Apple domestically (I posted more in the exclusivity thread).

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:34 PM #21

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 10 May 2010 03:38 PM

    ... Having multiple handset vendors ensures that the pace of innovation, coverage of price ranges, and divergence of devices beyond smartphones and tablets will promote a robust 3rd party marketplace ...

    That’s the strategy that Microsoft used against Apple and other OS companies, has become marketing 101.  I really want to know will it work for Android against iPhone, Nokia, RIMM, HP (WebOS) and Samsung (BADA).  So far, Verizon is using the same trick as for RIMM phone, buy one get one free to inflate the market share number.

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  • Posted: 10 May 2010 01:36 PM #22

    Mace - 10 May 2010 04:19 PM

    What phone is he using now?  If it is a dumb phone then he can’t afford the data plan and is giving excuses why he doesn’t need the iPhone.  I don’t use the email on the iPhone at all.

    He said that he had had an iPhone but switched back to the instinct. He didn’t really elaborate as to why other than to say that it suited him better. If I said he was dumb for such a suggestion he could have retaliated with the razor and scissors. He would only be dumb - I could have ended up looking dumb.

    It was a casual conversation but I thought it worth passing on.

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:36 PM #23

    Dear Brad,

    We get it. Your point is clear. We disagree with most of your opinion. Apple disagrees with your opinion. Let’s discuss more when there are new developments, shall we?

    I used to be a developer myself not-so-long ago, so at first I at least sympathized with you a bit, but you’ve been creating too much noise. It’s not like I’m going to put you on ‘ignore’ (I never do), but I’ve found myself skipping all your posts.

    Since your whining on this board (and insulting its members) isn’t going to change anything about Apple’s policy, there are much better uses of your time - and ours.

    KTHXBYE

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:40 PM #24

    sleepygeek - 10 May 2010 04:24 PM

    ... Android is replicating the MS Windows for PC’s situation where the PC maker doesn’t have a long term customer relationship. What did HP just decide about its Windows 7 tablet, which has all those good Android properties of being more powerful and fuller featured than iPad, more flexible, part of a huge range of products from many manufacturers with different features, yet all capable of running the same applications. How could such advantages not completely overwhelm iPad? Clearly HP has recently figured it out, even if Bosco hasn’t yet. In that situation, the “manufacturer” is just a merchant buying in a feature set and branding it, the same as WalMart.

    Very good point.  HP and Samsung have gotten wiser.

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:43 PM #25

    @rattyuk… I come here because I have this idealistic notion that we can agree without being disagreeable. Look at the bile you guys toss at me because I disagree with some of your assessments of Apple’s and competitors’ products. You’ve tossed it before, and I simply stood my ground, and now look, one key point I predicted is coming true. And that doesn’t make me Nostradamus. The writing has been on the wall since December. Nor am I “nah nah nah”-ing. I hope you will open your eyes and see the fundamental problem with Apple.

    Now look above, where a couple of you realize that not having iPhone on Verizon is hurting Apple and will continue hurting Apple more. Yeah, no kidding. And this is where you can take a leap of faith and think, hey, Bosco kinda has a sense for this, even if his sense pisses us off. Verizon will not have the iPhone so long as Steve Jobs is CEO. The conflict is deeply personal between him and Ivan Seidenberg. We all know that when Jobs is backed into a corner though, he will put on his smile and come up with a story about how everything is better now, and the old enemy is the new friend. Adobe and Verizon won’t bite this time. Unlike Microsoft, who saw a weak Apple on the verge of death, Adobe and Verizon have seen a belligerent Apple willing to go to war with anyone. And either will be happy to push Apple off a cliff.

    As shareholders, this ought to concern you now. Just as starting in November, I said that Verizon’s gloves-off approach to Droid ought to concern you.

         
  • Posted: 10 May 2010 01:49 PM #26

    Looking at the figures it actually looks like Google is eating into everyone except Apple. Apple has held steady while everyone else, including RIM have dropped. There should be a nice uptick next quarter when the new iPhone is released and all the original first time buyers who didn’t upgrade get their chance to get their hands on the new machine. Time will tell.

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  • Posted: 10 May 2010 01:50 PM #27

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 10 May 2010 04:14 PM

    When people realize that bottled water quality isn’t about brand (see repeated consumer group tests) but about convenience (easy to take on the go, easy to keep track of how much you drink), the store brand will fly off the shelves at a lower price.

    Based on this watery business analysis, can you please explain how the iPod? managed to win a 70% market share?

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:50 PM #28

    NeXTLoop - 10 May 2010 03:03 PM

    This is one of the reasons that I personally believe Apple HAS to release an iPhone on Verizon ASAP. It’s not about how much money can be made from Verizon’s 91m subscribers. Nor is it an issue of whether to release a CDMA version now, or an LTE version later.

    The real issue is getting the iPhone onto Android’s strongest turf (Verizon)...before Android becomes “good enough”. I have desperately wanted an iPhone since it came out, but having had bad experiences with AT&T in the past, I refuse to go back to AT&T. So I have a Moto Droid on Verizon. I picked it because it was the phone that offered the features that I want, and was able to sync with my Mac without any additional software (like BlackBerry’s require) ...

    Now, I feel the same urgency for Apple to release the iPhone for Verizon.  What do you think of Bosco’s comment that Droid is much better than iPhone?

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 01:51 PM #29

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 10 May 2010 04:43 PM

    Now look above, where a couple of you realize that not having iPhone on Verizon is hurting Apple and will continue hurting Apple more. Yeah, no kidding. And this is where you can take a leap of faith and think, hey, Bosco kinda has a sense for this, even if his sense pisses us off.

    As I’m one of the proponents of the idea that we’re missing some market with AT&T exclusivity, let me briefly respond to this. Yes, we don’t have the whole market. So? We don’t even know why. Drop your theories of Steve’s ego for a second because nobody knows then the legal contract with AT&T expires, let alone the specifics Verizon or Sprint may demand of Apple that may hurt Apple.

    So we agree with some of what you’re saying. We disagree with most. Reaching perfect agreement, as you hope, is impossible, unless we take your view or you take ours (wishful thinking). Repeated discussions of the same issues over and over again just create noise.

         
  • Posted: 10 May 2010 01:57 PM #30

    Android now outselling Apple’s iPhone, claims NPD
    Jonny Evans
    |
    May 10, 2010

    Smartphones running Google?s Android mobile OS are outselling Apple?s iPhone, claiming second place position among US phone operating systems, the latest NPD Group data claims.

    Based on data taken from 150,000 people filling in an online survey (which suggests some of the data could be shaky), the figures detail smartphone share in the first quarter of this year, they claim Android OS moved into second position at 28 percent behind RIM?s OS (36 percent) and ahead of Apple?s iPhone OS (21 percent).

    Owning one-fifth of the smartphone market already isn?t such a bad achievement for Apple. Add in the data we picked up last week - that iPhone sales surged 131.6 percent year-on-year and you can see the company?s pretty healthy.

    The appearance of Google Android on the scene has changed the market, however, and the readiness of mobile makers to jump on the search giant?s mobile bandwagon must have caused consternation to Cupertino. Android?s appearance may foster competition, but does mean Apple isn?t in a one-horse race.

    Last month, Apple COO, Tim Cook said: “If you look in terms of the geographies, we had some staggering growth rates, as you mentioned. If you look at Asia Pacific as an example, the iPhone units in Asia Pacific grew 474% year-over-year. Japan grew 183. Europe grew 133. So these are some fabulous numbers we?re seeing, just incredible demand for iPhone.?

    ?As in the past, carrier distribution and promotion have played a crucial role in determining smartphone market share,? said Ross Rubin, executive director of industry analysis for NPD. ?In order to compete with the iPhone, Verizon Wireless has expanded its buy-one-get-one offer beyond RIM devices to now include all of their smartphones.?

    Strong sales of non-Apple devices helped boos Verizon, though we are minded to wonder what impact opening iPhone sales up via Verizon would have on Apple?s smartphone share in the US…

    Current smartphone market leader, RIM, is developing its answer to Apple and Android in the form of its BlackBerry 6 OS; Microsoft is praying for another chance with Win Phone 7 and HP?s Palm purchase are all factors playing into the future evolution of the smartphone biz.

    Apple meanwhile will define its next 12 months with the next-gen iPhone, which many believe will show its face for the first time (legitimately) at WWDC 2010 next month.