Why The iPhone Is Better Than Andriod

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 02:08 PM #31

    Can I take it that this NPD survey is for US only?

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 02:23 PM #32

    Garion - 10 May 2010 04:50 PM

    Based on this watery business analysis, can you please explain how the iPod? managed to win a 70% market share?

    Garion, if you wish to un-report me and apologize for doing it in the first place, then I’ll elaborate for you. But you don’t get to have it both ways, where you harass me with direct messages and then ask me questions on the boards. Sorry.

    That said, for the other here who might be curious… Lifecycle cost, including indirect costs like switching to a crappy carrier, are significantly lower for an iPod than for an iPhone. There is a lot of room to undercut iPhone and many more angles that can be taken.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 04:03 PM #33

    Mace - 10 May 2010 05:08 PM

    Can I take it that this NPD survey is for US only?

    The NPD data is US only non business survey.  ATT stated they had activated 2.7M iPhones last quarter.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 04:42 PM #34

    There’s quite a lot missing from this conversation. I’ve written a piece looking at the tablet market but much of it relates to Android as a smart phone. All of what I write below is documented in my article. I’ll summarise here:
    1) Android’s greatest strength, being free and malleable, is also its greatest weakness. The phone shown in Pats original post on this thread I believe shows HTC’s Sensei UI for Android but not Android’s stock UI. The situation is that device manufacturers don’t want to use plain vanilla Android because it doesn’t give them much product differentiation from their competitors. So the temptation for device makers is to switch out Android Apps for their own or make UI changes. Additionally, the phone carriers are taking the same route, customising the UI and apps to suit their own internal purposes. The problem this creates is now referred to as Fragmentation, users are stuck on a particular version of Android and are unable to upgrade because of the conflicts with the customisation mentioned here. Fixing the problem requires both the phone carrier and device maker to work together and given the short upgrade cycle on Android phones that’s not cost effective so its not happening. Recent research shows 1/3 of Android users stuck on Android 1.6, another 1/3 on Android 2 and the last 1/3 running 2.1. 2.2 is due soon.
    2) The above problem is further exacerbated by the desire of the carrier companies to start their own App stores because Android’s open app system brings the carrier/device maker no knock on revenue. From their point of view they want a piece of the App pie that Apple is eating. This drives fragmentation further.
    3) Android was free but since HTC and Microsoft signed a patent infringement/royalties pact on HTC phones running Android, Microsoft now has a strong case to charge all Android device makers the same royalty. Rumour has it (not corroborated) that Microsoft is charging royalites at almost the same rate as the licence/unit fee as Windows mobile 7. Still Android offers customisation and other features that Win 7 mobile doesn’t.
    4) Because of fragmentation, some developers are disgruntled (though obviously not our man Bosco) with Android. If you read that there are N number of android phones out there, any app may or may not run on them because they’re stuck at different levels of OS release and some apps have a conflict with the customisation going on and won’t run.
    5) As a result of the Android Clone syndrome and the fragmentation, several large device manufacturers are moving away from Android. Samsung has bought a smartphone OS company called BADA and has begun marketing bespoke BADA phones (where samsung controls the app store etc). Motorola have just bought a similar company called Azingo and of course HP now has Palm. The more cheap and cheerful Chinese phones come out with Android the less the big players will want to market a similar phone OS as differentiation is the name of the game and commoditsation is its enemy. Android is a commodity OS and this will drive either further fragmentation or uptake of bespoke OS’s.
    6) The NPD data reported today is a bit IFFY. It relies on self reporting/self selected interviews of a relatively small USA only sample. But at some point there will be more aggregate Android phones out but that has to be taken in light of the fragmentation issues above.
    7) Lastly, I quote Jeff Croft’s report on FLASH running on Android as demoed at Flashcamp in Seattle:

    In the opening keynote, Ryan Stewart, a Flash Platform evangelist at Adobe, demoed Flash Player 10.1 running on his Nexus One phone. When I realized he was going to show it, I got excited ? I?ve been wanting to see how well Flash really works on a phone for years.

    Here?s what happened: On his Mac, Ryan pulled up a site called Eco Zoo. It is, seemingly, a pretty intense example of Flash development ? full of 3D rendering, rich interactions, and cute little characters. Then, he pulled up the same thing on his Nexus One. The site?s progress bar filled in and the 3D world appeared for a few seconds before the browser crashed. Ryan said (paraphrasing), ?Whoops! Well, it?s beta, and this is an intense example ? let?s try it again.? He tried it again and got the same result. So he said to the audience, ?Well, this one isn?t going to work, but does anyone have a Flash site they?d like to see running?? Someone shouted out ?Hulu.? Ryan said, ?Hulu doesn?t work,? and then wrapped up his demo, telling people if they wanted to try more sites they could find him later and he?d let them play with his Nexus One.

    Now to be fair Croft points out that Flash is still in Beta and the above can be expected of beta products. But talking about Flash on Android as though its signed, sealed and delivered in a way that will be usable is not at all guaranteed. It may work, it may kinda work or it may suck. Time will tell. Anyone who talks about it as though its reality is ignoring reality. Anybody who builds apps in flash and expecting it to work in Android running Flash player 10.1 is a trusting soul indeed. Pity the poor company that relies on Adobe to get Flash fully functioning on mobile devices.

    [ Edited: 10 May 2010 04:46 PM by relentlessFocus ]

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 05:23 PM #35

    Anybody who builds apps in flash and expecting it to work in Android running Flash player 10.1 is a trusting soul indeed. Pity the poor company that relies on Adobe to get Flash fully functioning on mobile device.

    You’re confusing Flash and AIR with Flash in the browser. Just as Flash developers can now create real iPhone apps using Flash, they will be able to create real Android apps using Flash. This small point complicates your analysis a bit.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 05:25 PM #36

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 10 May 2010 02:55 PM
    pats - 08 May 2010 10:21 PM

    This guy is obviously a geek who will custom the device but think of the average consumer.

    “iPhone: Because you’re just too stupid for Android.”

    Genius, Bosco!  What a great marketing line for the iPhone! 

    Apple should jump on it and pay you $$$$$$$‘s for the right to use it against Android!  (Your slogan could just about be the coup-de-grace for the already staggering Droids.)

    [ Edited: 10 May 2010 05:35 PM by BurmaYank ]

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    - my most favorite Chinese Cookie fortune:  “Stiff in opinion; always in the wrong.”

    - my second most favorite Chinese Cookie fortune:  “There is something seeing and there is something being seen.”

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 05:35 PM #37

    Excellent summarization.

    Couple comments. 
    When we get in these market share metrics we should definitely look at quarterly trends but installed base matters for people trying to make money as developers or accessory makers.

    It is obvious that Android handsets have some serious momentum going into 2010 but growth in Android is not necessarily at the expense of growth in Apple’s Iphone OS.  The fragmentation issue will be one to watch in 2010.  Since many of the older devices will be incapable of upgrading to the newest features will this preplanned obsolescence cause users to switch to an alternate operating system or stick with an Android device and will their Apps make the jump with them.  We have seen Apple navigate this upgrade cycle several times and it appears they are doing an admirable job of maintaining user satisfaction and capturing repeat buyers.  As an investor the stickiness of Apple’s ecosystem is a key differentiator vs many of the competitors. 

    For me the whole Adobe Flash 10.1 on mobile is a sideshow.  The flash player will not own the mobile market for video playback.  Webkit has become the de-facto standard for mobile smartphone browsing engine and Apple as a major code contributor will focus their effort to ensure that HTML 5 is rapidly implemented and frameworks are put forward such as sprout core to enable Rich Internet Applications without flash.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 05:57 PM #38

    @BurmaYank… You don’t get sarcasm, do you? Thanks for making yourself part of my joke. I appreciate it.

    Now, I’ll spell it out again for those who don’t get sarcasm… Let’s call iPhone absolute perfection. Android has achieved some high enough percentage of perfection that it’s adequate for a good segment of the market. We can argue back and forth what that high enough percentage is. I’d say 105%. You might say 80%. But there is no doubt now that Android and iPhone are competing on cost rather than relative magicalness. Costs include dollar costs like subsidized price and total cost of contract. Costs also include inconvenience of carrier switching, carrier performance, and even App Store policies. We’ll eventually see the percentage of the market for which Android is adequate.

    Personally, I know that just 9 months ago, the iPhone commanded premium price ($ and non-$ costs) from me, twice. Today, not at all. The trend of the data suggests that I’m not the only one who makes that evaluation, and that the segment that does has gone from zero to parity in about 6 months.

         
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    Posted: 10 May 2010 06:31 PM #39

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 10 May 2010 08:57 PM

    @BurmaYank… You don’t get sarcasm, do you? Thanks for making yourself part of my joke. I appreciate it.

    Now, I’ll spell it out again for those who don’t get sarcasm… Let’s call iPhone absolute perfection. Android has achieved some high enough percentage of perfection that it’s adequate for a good segment of the market. We can argue back and forth what that high enough percentage is. I’d say 105%. You might say 80%. But there is no doubt now that Android and iPhone are competing on cost rather than relative magicalness. Costs include dollar costs like subsidized price and total cost of contract. Costs also include inconvenience of carrier switching, carrier performance, and even App Store policies. We’ll eventually see the percentage of the market for which Android is adequate.

    Personally, I know that just 9 months ago, the iPhone commanded premium price ($ and non-$ costs) from me, twice. Today, not at all. The trend of the data suggests that I’m not the only one who makes that evaluation, and that the segment that does has gone from zero to parity in about 6 months.

    I mostly agree with your analysis, Android will be the “good enough” OS for phones for box shifting device manufacturers which don’t seek to maximise profits through smart device app store and bespoke apps, etc. Android will find itself more and more on cheap and cheerful phones and as you say, for many, that will be good enough. Lots of people shop at Wal-mart and that doesn’t put bloomingdales out of business (which may be a bad analogy but I haven’t lived in the USA for 25 years). I know that ASDA does not hurt Selfridge’s sales and the huge amount of netbook’s sold have not crimped Apple’s bottom line.

    However, If you look at where the money is made, its at the high end of the market and that’s where companies like Samsung, Sony, HTC, LG and Motorola look to differentiate themselves from the chinese commodity hardware producers. These premium brands which spend a lot of money creating corporate images will as I said above be driven to either customise the Android OS to a degree that really creates uncertainty for users (will this app I already have work with a late 2012 HTC XYZ phone?) and frustration for programmers who find themselves trying to support frustrated users in an increasingly complex support environment. Alternatively these high end brands will switch from Android and get themselves a bespoke OS where they can create a rich custom experience and bespoke apps and skim the App Store concept and Apple’s revenue model. As Android starts moving down the hardware price scale it will become less and less interesting as a high end premium phone (again where the money is) and lose a lot of the panache it currently has as “the iPhone alternative”

    I agree that Android will be the “good enough” mass market phone OS and as long as the non- Apple market is robust, Google’s motivation to continue advancing Android will moderate. After all, they don’t make money from Android, it costs them money to keep it going. Money well worth it right now to halt Apple’s hegemony but maybe not in 5 years when this market is more stable with Android at the cheap end, Blackberry, Azingo, WebOS, BADA and other entries will compete with Apple at the middle and high end and here I think Apple is well placed to dominate (biggest app store, custom CPUs, apple’s user experience expertise, world wide distro channels, etc). So I guess we’ll all be happy. grin

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 07:11 PM #40

    Just as a follow up, Sprint has announced that its not going to carry the Nexus One after singing its praises. Instead its going with the HTC EVO 4g which is an Android phone with HTC’s modified Sense UI replacing Android’s stock UI. So all you have to do is toss the following phrase in a Google search field: htc sense ui app incompatibility

    and start reading…

    This is the reality behind the attention grabbing headlines claiming Android outselling iPhone…

    Just found this article which pulls it all together.

    [ Edited: 10 May 2010 07:14 PM by relentlessFocus ]

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    Posted: 10 May 2010 07:16 PM #41

    RF, thanks for bringing sanity back to the thread. Very insightful.

         
  • Posted: 10 May 2010 08:18 PM #42

    Bosco (Brad Hutchings) - 10 May 2010 03:38 PM

    The only condolences I can offer is that maybe the data is wrong.

    I think you’re right that it’s wrong:

    http://macdailynews.com/index.php/weblog/comments/25168/

    BOGO giveaways work wonders for unit “sales.” (BTW, if you must, attack the message, not the source.)

    There are some things that Droid does far better than iPhone. Notifications, multi-tasking (even vs iPhone OS 4 betas), music player

    Unlike the iPhone, Android-based phones don’t provide a global near realtime notifications system. And Android’s multi-tasking scheme is similar to the iPhone OS 4.0’s but definitely not better:

    http://davidquintana.com/entry/mobile-multitasking
    http://money.cnn.com/2010/04/21/smallbusiness/google_android/ (see Lesson #1)

    Tens of millions of iPod users would disagree with your contention that the Android’s music player implementation is better that the iPhone’s iPod.

    Having multiple handset vendors ensures that the pace of innovation, coverage of price ranges, and divergence of devices beyond smartphones and tablets will promote a robust 3rd party marketplace.

    And yet, except for “divergence of devices,” that simply hasn’t happened.

    Flash 10.1 will become such a key feature of Android that Jobs will have to change his tune by Fall, and will probably be rebuffed by Adobe.

    You’ve topped yourself with this one: By the time Adobe gets a working version of Flash for mobile devices, it will no longer be relevant. Here’s the current status:

    http://jeffcroft.com/blog/2010/may/08/android-flash-demo-flashcamp-seattle/

    Sad…

         
  • Posted: 05 September 2010 06:52 PM #43

    My god I can not believe how some of you think. I will tell you that I have the desire and it does what the Iphone can do and more. Not saying the Iphone is a bad phone I like a lot of features it has but they both have ups and downs. When I am beside my friend with his Iphone 4 we notice the pro and cons all the time. First off the app store for apple is good it has better games. But when you go on line and look at the game creators they are making the game for Android.So we have to wait a little bit. The pros of the Android is that your phone can look cool not just a page full of dam apps. That is all I see when I see the Iphone its just a page full of squares WOW. I like the Android OS and Android is not copying Apple I think it is the other way around.The most popular thing to do with an Iphone now a days it to JAILBREAK it. Enough said on that. They are still the TOP phones For me I believe Apple is doing so well is because it is the first to come out with a working touch screen phone and has great marketing. I tell ya when people have no Bios opinion and are looking at my phone and my friends Iphone and we talk them up I have a lot of friends that went Android.

         
  • Posted: 05 September 2010 07:33 PM #44

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    My god I can not believe how some of you think.

    Well, mostly we hang about and talk about Apple from a shareholder perspective. But feel free to join in. This thread ended in May so quite a few things have changed since this conversation was initiated.

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    I will tell you that I have the desire and it does what the Iphone can do and more. Not saying the Iphone is a bad phone I like a lot of features it has but they both have ups and downs.

    Yes and so has the Android.

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    When I am beside my friend with his Iphone 4 we notice the pro and cons all the time. First off the app store for apple is good it has better games. But when you go on line and look at the game creators they are making the game for Android.So we have to wait a little bit.

    Whereas most of the programmers that want to do a decent job and earn money go to where the paying customers are. That is the iPhone for the time being.

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    The pros of the Android is that your phone can look cool not just a page full of dam apps. That is all I see when I see the Iphone its just a page full of squares WOW.

    Would you care to explain the look and feel of the Samsung Tab then? It is based on Android and yet it has “a page full of squares” for it’s home screen.

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    I like the Android OS and Android is not copying Apple I think it is the other way around.

    Yeah, right.

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    The most popular thing to do with an Iphone now a days it to JAILBREAK it. Enough said on that.

    Er no. Less than 10% are jailbreaking their phones. So this is hardly the most popular thing to do.

    Big B - 05 September 2010 09:52 PM

    For me I believe Apple is doing so well is because it is the first to come out with a working touch screen phone and has great marketing. I tell ya when people have no Bios opinion and are looking at my phone and my friends Iphone and we talk them up I have a lot of friends that went Android.

    It’s nice to hear an alternate opinion.

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  • Posted: 05 September 2010 07:46 PM #45

    Would you care to explain the look and feel of the Samsung Tab then? It is based on Android and yet it has ?a page full of squares? for it?s home screen.


    For me I use Launcherpro and I also use the stock HTC Sense both use UI not to say that is the best in the world or nothing but it gives you something more than a page full of apps. And yes I also have 2 pages full of apps. I am just saying that at least you can make your phone your own.

    For me I guess what makes the Iphone so much better than say the HTC Desire with Android 2.2 ??

    [ Edited: 05 September 2010 07:49 PM by Big B ]