The End of the Internet

  • Posted: 05 August 2010 02:21 PM

    Google and Verizon, two leading players in Internet service and content, are nearing an agreement that could allow Verizon to speed some online content to Internet users more quickly if the content?s creators are willing to pay for the privilege.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/05/technology/05secret.html?_r=1

    [ Edited: 05 August 2010 02:25 PM by Zeke ]      
  • Posted: 05 August 2010 02:48 PM #1

    artman1033 - 05 August 2010 05:29 PM

    This will be perceived by many as anti GOOGLE.

    WONDERFUL!

    If this deal is consummated both Google and Verizon will disappear from my life and spending habits, as much as it is possible to do so, immediately and permanently.  This effectively transposes the cable TV model onto the internet, turning it into just a giant commercial billboard.

    On the other hand, we’ll all be able to move on and do more productive things, like mow the lawn.

         
  • Posted: 05 August 2010 02:58 PM #2

    They are denying all of this now… “We didn’t say that…” much reversing from both Google and Verizon.

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    Posted: 05 August 2010 03:05 PM #3

    Counterpoint

    Edit:

    Updated 1:15 p.m.:
    And adding baking soda to the fire, Google just denied the New York Times report via Twitter.
    (1:16:41 PM): “@NYTimes is wrong. We’ve not had any convos with VZN about paying for carriage of our traffic. We remain committed to an open Internet.”

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    “Knowledge speaks, but wisdom listens.”
    - Jimi Hendrix

         
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    Posted: 05 August 2010 04:48 PM #4

    Zeke - 05 August 2010 05:48 PM
    artman1033 - 05 August 2010 05:29 PM

    This will be perceived by many as anti GOOGLE.

    WONDERFUL!

    If this deal is consummated both Google and Verizon will disappear from my life and spending habits, as much as it is possible to do so, immediately and permanently.  This effectively transposes the cable TV model onto the internet, turning it into just a giant commercial billboard.

    On the other hand, we’ll all be able to move on and do more productive things, like mow the lawn.

    I did just buy a new ZTR.

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    Black Swan Counter: 9 (Banks need money, Jobs needs a break, Geithner has no plan, Cuomo’s grandstanding, .Gov needs a hobby, GS works for money, flash crash, is that bubbling crude?).

    For those who look, a flash allows one to see farther.

         
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    Posted: 05 August 2010 05:00 PM #5

    Eric Landstrom - 05 August 2010 07:48 PM

    [

    I did just buy a new ZTR.


    How are those wheelies coming?

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    Adversity does not just build character, it reveals it.

         
  • Posted: 05 August 2010 07:22 PM #6

    Nice brickwork!

         
  • Posted: 06 August 2010 12:31 AM #7

    FCC chair: neutrality would trump any Google/Verizon pact
    updated 03:35 pm EDT, Thu August 5, 2010

    FCC says neutrality overrides Google, Verizon view

    Any possible pact between Google and Verizon on Internet neutrality would have no effect on the FCC’s policies, agency chairman Julius Genachowski declared today. When asked, he was adamant that net neutrality as seen by the FCC would remain intact. Genachowski wasn’t clear on whether this would extend to wireless, whose fate is still undecided, but said it was important to preserve an even competitive field.

    “Any outcome, any deal that doesn’t preserve the freedom and openness of the Internet for consumers and entrepreneurs will be unacceptable,” he claimed.

    Google and its frequent Android partner have allegedly struck a deal that would preserve neutrality on landlines but abandon it on cellular links, giving Verizon the ability to charge more for certain kinds of content over its phone network and potentially the authority to block or throttle apps and services, including those that could compete with its own features.

    The two companies accused of making the deal have so far been evasive in addressing the question. At the Techonomy conference on Wednesday, Google CEO Eric Schmidt didn’t touch on specific talks and only said that the two companies had been chatting for a long time on neutrality as subject; he thought neutrality was important to avoid discriminating against companies but not for different types.

    Verizon in an official statement didn’t deny talks but said that an NYT article accusing it of wanting to charge extra for certain Internet content “fundamentally misunderstands our purpose” and that it wasn’t making a business deal but rather advocating policies. It claimed to want an open, responsible Internet but wanted to curb regulation to “specific FCC authority, while maintaining investment and innovation.” The carrier didn’t directly challenge accusations that it was pressing Google to drop any calls for neutrality in wireless.

         
  • Posted: 09 August 2010 09:25 PM #8

    Google and Verizon propose neutrality rules, exempt wireless
    updated 03:00 pm EDT, Mon August 9, 2010
    Google to sell out wireless for neutrality win

    Google and Verizon this afternoon outlined their widely rumored proposal for net neutrality guidelines. As expected, the terms would focus on wired controls but would sacrifice fairness in wireless to reach the goal. The FCC would be the only official body and would have authority to ban both blocking or throttling legal traffic as well as limit prioritization of certain content, but only on wired networks.

    Both wired and wireless networks would have a requirement for transparency, which would require any carrier to clearly disclose how it shapes traffic and other limits on the network. Wired services could have special services such as IPTV, but these would have to be clearly separated from general Internet access so they aren’t used as forms of cheating the neutrality rules, the two companies said.

    The Universal Service Fund would, as proposed by the FCC, be converted from wired phones to broadband.

    Google justified the exception of cellular networks by describing wireless data as a “still-nascent” business, whose circumstances are “more competitive and changing rapidly” compared to the entrenched wired environment. It did promise that the Government Accountability Office, in this interpretation, would have to report to Congress every year on whether current measures are properly protecting customers.

    The statements are likely to draw controversy if, as accepted, they would give carriers like Verizon free rein to discriminate against legitimate service that would compete with its own services. It would have legal support for banning VoIP to force customers to use its own cellular minutes, for example, or prevent streaming Internet video from a third party in favor of a paid subscription to its own plans. Verizon has been willing to use more open platforms such as Android but has already neutered functionality by preventing Skype calls over 3G.

    Google’s motivations behind the deal have already been called into question. The search firm is heavily dependent on Verizon for Android phone sales and would stand to lose significant market share and mobile ad revenue if its carrier partner backed away.

    The proposal isn’t binding and may face opposition from the FCC itself. Chairman Julius Genachowski has said that Google and Verizon suggestions wouldn’t necessarily influence policy as he was concerned about preserving net neutrality regardless of what either company thought was best.

         
  • Posted: 10 August 2010 04:19 AM #9

    Google and Verizon, two leading players in the Internet service and content, the approach of an agreement that would allow Verizon to accelerate some online content to users faster Internet. Fees may be paid to companies like YouTube, etc. The agreement could ultimately lead to higher fees for Internet users.

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  • Posted: 14 August 2010 09:35 PM #10

    AT&T defends Verizon-Google mobile exemption from net neutrality

    AT&T has jumped into the fray on net neutrality, pointing out that mobile networks are fundamentally different from broadband and saying they should be largely free of any regulation as an internet service rather than being classified as a telecom service under the oversight of the FCC.

         
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    Posted: 15 August 2010 03:56 PM #11

    willrob - 15 August 2010 12:35 AM

    AT&T defends Verizon-Google mobile exemption from net neutrality

    AT&T has jumped into the fray on net neutrality, pointing out that mobile networks are fundamentally different from broadband and saying they should be largely free of any regulation as an internet service rather than being classified as a telecom service under the oversight of the FCC.

    The AT&T stance seems increasingly strange the more one thinks about it. If they are not functioning as an ISP, then what are they doing?

    Indeed, I remember watching routing information with amazement in the early days of the internet, which showed that data were being carried mainly by the major telecoms. And those data jumped from telecom to telecom to take advantage of the available bandwidth.

    With the expansion of the mobile web, net neutrality becomes even more relevant. The role of the telecoms as ISPs, not to mention as a backbone of the internet, needs to be watched closely to ensure that a level playing field exists for all.