New Google tablet “Could be free”

  • Posted: 20 August 2010 04:07 PM #16

    Lstream - 20 August 2010 04:20 PM
    DawnTreader - 19 August 2010 02:17 AM

    Lstream:

    I almost want to print your post and frame it.  grin

    I said in the iPad wannabe topic Android is/was a stopgap OS. It has no real future and Chrome is what Google is banking on for the future. So now we have hardware makers planning Android tablets that may see their market evaporate before the first product ships.

    If and I say “if” Verion heavily subsidizes a Chrome tablet device, we all know what comes next.  grin

    While it seems clear that Android dependency is ugly for the manufacturers, there is no real choice for them but to continue.  Android is a credible ecosystem in the eyes of their customers, and it is getting stronger.  What real choice do they have?  They basically have no hope to create a credible OS vs either Android or iOS. 

    This story makes the case that RIM must make the switch to Android.  I have felt this for a while.  Android + BES + RIM Handsets would be a very credible offering.  Whether RIM has capacity to make such a tough choice remains to be seen, but the performance of the new Torch likely has them seriously thinking about what to do.  If this happens, Apple’s competitive environment is going to get worse.

    So ugly as it is, every Smartphone manufacturer appears to have absolutely no choice but to carry on with Android.  So I think Android definitely has a future, because what other alternative do the handset manufacturers have?  This is part of the reason that I think Apple needs to fix its single carrier vulnerability in the US.  It is way too easy for Android to build market share by default as things currently stand.


    Exactly. This and production constraints are the dilemma’s Apple faces.

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  • Posted: 20 August 2010 06:14 PM #17

    Lstream - 20 August 2010 04:20 PM

    This story makes the case that RIM must make the switch to Android.  I have felt this for a while.  Android + BES + RIM Handsets would be a very credible offering.

    I would think that Rim switching to Android would be the death of the company.

    Now before I go any further, let me backtrack by saying that I think their current strategy is going to be the death of the company too. But I’m not sure how switching to Android will help. I think it would simply mark the beginning of the end. The idea reminds me of when Palm decided to put out separate Palm and Windows OS’s. The move didn’t make sense to me then and, looking back, I think it didn’t make any sense to me because it didn’t make any sense.

    Now back to BlackBerry. If they went to Android, exactly how would they be any different from any other Android device? Why would one want a BlackBerry? They’d just be another Android device.

    Truthfully, I think BlackBerry could add some differentiation to their products. But would it be enough? I’m waiting to be convinced.

         
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    Posted: 20 August 2010 07:00 PM #18

    FalKirk - 20 August 2010 09:14 PM

    I would think that Rim switching to Android would be the death of the company.

    Asymco dwells on the subject here (the post is from a couple of days ago and has been linked to in another thread, but if someone hasn’t read it, it’s highly recommended). Relevant quote from his answer to a comment: “The more distressed the company is the more likely it is to grasp Android. There is talk of RIM getting that desperate some day.”

    I can see it going both ways. RIM has a fighting chance to carve out and keep its enterprise niche if it ups the ante with the app / developer ecosystem. But their consumer attempts look increasingly desperate.

         
  • Posted: 21 August 2010 01:32 AM #19

    Lstream - 20 August 2010 04:20 PM
    DawnTreader - 19 August 2010 02:17 AM

    So ugly as it is, every Smartphone manufacturer appears to have absolutely no choice but to carry on with Android.  So I think Android definitely has a future, because what other alternative do the handset manufacturers have?  This is part of the reason that I think Apple needs to fix its single carrier vulnerability in the US.  It is way too easy for Android to build market share by default as things currently stand.

    The challenge for device makers is Android offers little to no differentiation opportunities. Without price capitulation and thus margin reductions there’s no real way to boost volume in a crowded product market. This might play well for wireless services providers that can pit one manufacturer against another for price competition, but it does nothing for device makers in terms of maintaining pricing control and there’s no revenue benefit to handset makers from app or content sales.

    Commoditization is an economic hazard and the more crowded the market for handsets the less the opportunities participate in the spoils.

         
  • Posted: 21 August 2010 12:52 PM #20

    RIM moving to Android would cause them to loose their main strength for enterprise, their secure network. Android has already been plagued with viruses and hacks. Their damned if they do and damned if they don’t.

         
  • Posted: 21 August 2010 01:03 PM #21

    willrob - 21 August 2010 03:52 PM

    RIM moving to Android would cause them to loose their main strength for enterprise, their secure network. Android has already been plagued with viruses and hacks. Their damned if they do and damned if they don’t.

    So that would make them damned then?

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  • Posted: 21 August 2010 02:08 PM #22

    Fortunes were made by hardware manufacturers licensing Windows in the computer industry. These hardware manufacturers did not need to invent their own OS to thrive. In the Windows world, margins were thin as competition was fierce, but the most efficient made fortunes along with their shareholders. The licensing model enabled Windows to own market share.

    Therefore, it is NOT a sign of weakness to license Android, but an acknowledgment of where the future may lie.

    The most efficient Android smartphone makers will make fortunes as well, they just won’t make the outsized profits that Apple will. I must reiterate my belief that the smartphone market (defined by OS share) is not a winner take all market like it was for decades in the WINTEL world. The internet finally changed the market share dynamics enabling the MAC to thrive after nearly killing it. The smartphone market will be defined by applications and execution. In this regard, Apple is best positioned to make the lions share of the profits, albeit the market share loser.

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  • Posted: 21 August 2010 03:06 PM #23

    willrob - 21 August 2010 03:52 PM

    RIM moving to Android would cause them to loose their main strength for enterprise, their secure network. Android has already been plagued with viruses and hacks. Their damned if they do and damned if they don’t.

    Ya, they are in a tight spot no matter what they do, but one of RIM’s one remaining strengths (but likely to fade fast if they don’t move quick) is their huge acceptance in the Enterprise.  IT and Security acceptance in these companies is very difficult to achieve and anything new gets huge push-back. 

    In the consumer space, BB Messenger appears to have some degree of consumer appeal.  My daughter and most of her friends chose BB for that one app.  If a “better” handset like the iPhone could replicate that free service, then BB loses that customer group.  Seems to me that BB’s back end server and infrastructure is an asset that no one else has, and they should be able to build on it.  But they must have handsets that people still want to use.  Handsets that use their current OS don’t pass this test in today’s new reality. 

    Combine this with the new reality that people want to use their personal handset for work, and there is at least a sliver of an opening for RIM. Or better yet, if the office is handing out free endorsed phones, and its one the employee wants anyway, then that phone has a huge advantage.  Enterprises are going to see pressure from their employees to use their Android handsets at work.  IT and Security are going to scream “no way” for the reason quoted above, but the pressure will not go away.

    Without commenting on the technical feasibility of this, what if RIM could approach all of their install base with a message that contained the following main planks:

    1. BB grade security in an Android platform.  If they could credibly do this, then they would have a slice of powerful differentiation in an otherwise commodity market.  Turn Android’s weakness into a strength. 

    2. Full compatibility with your existing BES investment.

    3. Free BB Messenger.  Done right, this saves the Enterprise money in a way that on one else can.  I suspect that RIM could strengthen the social networking part of this app to take advantage of the innate need for employees to collaborate.

    4. No decrease in the rich e-mail functionality that already exists for Exchange customers, but with a modern interface.  BB"s e-mail functionality is still way better than Exchange on the iPhone.  However the interface is so primitive and complex that this advantage is blunted.

    5. Free add-on for oppressive third world countries that want to spy on their citizens smile

    This stuff will be hard, and I don’t even know how much of it is feasible, but otherwise the writing is on the wall for these guys.  Customers are voting with their feet now and telling RIM that their current platform no longer cuts it.  On the other hand, I expect that many large customers don’t want to give up on them since they are such a trusted supplier.  They must figure out how to use that asset before it truly is too late.  For their sake, they better have a skunkworks up and running with Android already.

    If they do, then Apple’s competitive environment will get more challenging.

         
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    Posted: 21 August 2010 03:34 PM #24

    One of RIMs advantages is in regulated industries or where FIPS 140-2 is required.  iOS and Android are just getting to the point where they meet the security requirements so RIM is the only choice.  For instance in DOD you need a CAC card(smart card) to use a computer on a DOD network and the system needs to go through certification and accreditation. This stuff takes time and until it is completed you won’t see Android or Apple tablets on the network, but the users want the devices so RIMs advantage IMO will only exist for a couple years at best.  I think Apple’s FaceTIme is a great answer to RIMs BB messenger.  It is video only now, but could easily adopt voice chat and text.  FYI the game center code in 4.1 supports in game voice chat.
    http://developer.apple.com/iphone/library/documentation/NetworkingInternet/Conceptual/GameKit_Guide/InGameVoice/InGameVoice.html

         
  • Posted: 22 August 2010 12:54 AM #25

    Yes, our source tells us that Google is building a Chrome OS tablet. It’s real….]

    I’ve been thinking more on this, and the more I think about it, the less “real” I think this is. From all previous reports, Chrome is no where near ready. Android manufacturers have been unable to get an Android table on the market, but now a Chrome tablet is ready? I don’t know nothing from nothing, but this stinks to high heaven. I’ll be very surprised if this is anything more than mere fantasy.

         
  • Posted: 22 August 2010 08:17 AM #26

    FalKirk - 22 August 2010 03:54 AM

    I’ve been thinking more on this, and the more I think about it, the less “real” I think this is. From all previous reports, Chrome is no where near ready. Android manufacturers have been unable to get an Android table on the market, but now a Chrome tablet is ready? I don’t know nothing from nothing, but this stinks to high heaven. I’ll be very surprised if this is anything more than mere fantasy.

    “Don’t buy the thing that is in the shops now and advertised on televisions, look over here, we have shiny things that work much better with free milk and unicorns and double rainbows real soon now” Classic Microsoft marketing technique from the 90s. A company announces a product and Microsoft’s sales force was suddenly telling everyone that they had one available in beta and they should stick with Microsoft and everything would be fantastic. Meanwhile a “crack” Microsoft programming team would be assigned to clone whatever feature the sales staff insisted had to be added to code. Rinse and repeat until the customers had forgotten about it.

    If Android is so good why do Google think that a browser based OS is the way to go on a tablet? Why split your development? It is very strange.

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  • Posted: 23 August 2010 05:15 PM #27

    Potential bad news for Android developers:

    http://www.engadget.com/2010/08/23/androids-new-app-licensing-scheme-apparently-easy-to-break/