Verizon CEO: iPhone Not Coming Soon

  • Posted: 24 September 2010 05:11 PM #16

    cranium - 24 September 2010 01:03 AM
    FalKirk - 23 September 2010 11:49 PM

    We know that Apple went to Verizon and Verizon rejected them. We know that Apple went to AT&T and entered into a five year exclusive deal. (From court documents) We do not know if that deal has been modified or what the “out” clause is, but we know that there is an out clause because Apple seriously considered moving to Verizon on several prior occasions (From an article that I am too lazy to cite.)

    Isn’t it possible that back in 2007, Apple looked into their crystal ball and predicted that LTE would start to become available on Verizon around about the summer of 2012? And since the iPhone is selling as fast as it can be made, isn’t it possible that Apple will wait on LTE technology before seriously approaching Verizon? And isn’t it possible that by that time Verizon will be under so much pressure that they’ll buckle and agree to Apple’s terms?

    Just saying….

    I said this last October, and I think this is reinforced by Seidenberg’s comments today:

    “we?ll see iPhone on Verizon when their network is ready for the iPhone, not when a new iPhone is ready for their network.”

    I’m still left wondering why he’d come out with a statement at all? As DT mentioned, doesn’t this just give a lot of customers, or potential customers, the idea that they should kill any ideas they had of moving or staying with Verizon in hopes of getting an iPhone there? Why make any statement at all?

    My Verizon contract ends next October. If by that time Verizon does not have a deal with Apple, and AT&T should be fully accessible in my area, then I will get an AT&T iPhone.

         
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    Posted: 24 September 2010 06:10 PM #17

    Mav - 24 September 2010 07:34 AM

    The iPhone will be incredibly disruptive to Verizon’s service.  There’s no way Apple would allow VCast, VZ Navigator, etc. on an iPhone (that or have Verizon submit an equivalent-functionality app for approval…somehow I don’t see that happening).  And Verizon’s implementation of Visual Voicemail…*shudder*.

    Verizon will either have to retool its business philosophy or make big exceptions for iPhone just for things to work, “culturally speaking”.

    I think you’ve got it spot on. Verizon has always hobbled, mangled, and disfigured devices to suit their own purposes. That won’t fly with Apple. So the iPhone will be a Sprint and maybe T-Mobile product in January 2011. Verizon might decide to play by the LTE rollout, but probably not.

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    Posted: 24 September 2010 07:08 PM #18

    Until the exclusivity with AT&T is over, there will be holdouts waiting for iPhone to come to Verizon. There is some risk that once Apple adds another US carrier, if Verizon is not on the table, then Apple could finally lose the holdouts waiting for a Verizon iPhone. Because once it’s clear that exclusivity is over, the last holdouts will have nothing left to wait for. Not sure how many we’re talking about though. Hopefully we won’t have to deal with that and there will be a Verizon iPhone.

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  • Posted: 25 September 2010 12:50 AM #19

    The end of exclusivity may in reality be a big non-issue. The iPhone will eventually be available on most of the major carriers. AT&T has done extraordinarily well under the agreement and they have come to understand the unique needs of Apple customers. I have no desire to switch carriers and each month I have excess minutes because of the emergence of texting as a social phenomenon.

    In today’s world with unlimited texting plans and no long distance charges it really doesn’t matter what network someone is on and AT&T may remain the #1 wireless services provider for iPhone owners for quite some time.

    AT&T will soon surpass Verizon to become the nation’s #1 wireless services provider and their service has improved noticeably. It really doesn’t matter if Apple adds other service providers other than Verizon and a Verizon deal will come in time.

         
  • Posted: 26 September 2010 11:26 PM #20

    Anyone who thinks that iPhone is coming soon to Verizon needs to read this.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/25/AR2010092503456.html?hpid=sec-tech

    The clash of culture seems to be increasing rather than decreasing.

         
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    Posted: 27 September 2010 12:25 AM #21

    vpndev - 27 September 2010 02:26 AM

    Anyone who thinks that iPhone is coming soon to Verizon needs to read this.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/25/AR2010092503456.html?hpid=sec-tech

    The clash of culture seems to be increasing rather than decreasing.

    Scathing.  I like it! :D

    Openness?  More like opening the door to unintended consequences.  It’s as simple as living up to the promise, and that hasn’t been done by a long shot.  Such hypocrisy.  Keep on ruling your customers’ air, Verizon.

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  • Posted: 27 September 2010 12:34 AM #22

    Mav - 27 September 2010 03:25 AM
    vpndev - 27 September 2010 02:26 AM

    Anyone who thinks that iPhone is coming soon to Verizon needs to read this.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/09/25/AR2010092503456.html?hpid=sec-tech

    The clash of culture seems to be increasing rather than decreasing.

    Scathing.  I like it! :D

    Openness?  More like opening the door to unintended consequences.  It’s as simple as living up to the promise, and that hasn’t been done by a long shot.  Such hypocrisy.  Keep on ruling your customers’ air, Verizon.

    Perhaps this should be filed as another example of the Law of Unintended Consequences.

         
  • Posted: 27 September 2010 12:44 AM #23

    DawnTreader - 25 September 2010 03:50 AM

    The end of exclusivity may in reality be a big non-issue. The iPhone will eventually be available on most of the major carriers. AT&T has done extraordinarily well under the agreement and they have come to understand the unique needs of Apple customers. I have no desire to switch carriers and each month I have excess minutes because of the emergence of texting as a social phenomenon.

    In today’s world with unlimited texting plans and no long distance charges it really doesn’t matter what network someone is on and AT&T may remain the #1 wireless services provider for iPhone owners for quite some time.

    AT&T will soon surpass Verizon to become the nation’s #1 wireless services provider and their service has improved noticeably. It really doesn’t matter if Apple adds other service providers other than Verizon and a Verizon deal will come in time.

    Since the release of the iPhone4 and the iPad I have noticed a material degradation of service. I frequently travel amongst US cities, so this is not just a local issue. Being such a vocal Apple and iPhone fan I am frequently embarrassed by my AT&T service as the number of dropped calls has skyrocketed.

    Luckily for AT&T, even with the poor service, I wouldn’t consider giving up my iPhone. But if I had a better alternative…

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    Posted: 27 September 2010 12:49 AM #24

    Is “VZ everything” a better alternative?

    Is Sprint, bundler of NASCAR, a better alternative?

    Is T-Mobile, who also hasn’t escaped the addictive allure of captive apps and bundling, a better alternative?

    I hate to say it, but man, it seems like all of the carriers suck.  Good reception is great and all, but it sure looks to be an iffy customer experience in those other cel network pastures.  I also wonder if any carrier can cope with the combined pressure of several million iPhones and data-enabled iPads.  Makes me wonder about the true strength of the cel networks’ data infrastructure.

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    Posted: 27 September 2010 02:21 AM #25

    The U.S. situation (and the world to a lesser extent) with the carriers’ quality and customer service is ridiculous. Surely, someone should be able to come and fix these things, and I’m sure customers would happily pay a premium on the average $50/month (combined voice and data) to get rid of the insufferable experience the current carriers offer.

    But let’s assume they wont pay more than $50/month. Well, if we’re talking about 100 million subscribers, that’s $5b per month, $60b per year, $120b over the standard 2-year contract. How much could a good quality network infrastructure cost? $20b? How much to maintain? $5b/year? How much could good quality and friendly customer service cost? another $10b/year or $100/customer/year? I have no idea if these figures are in the ballpark, but even if they are off by 100%, I can see a profitable opportunity there (on top of the potential for hardware+software+services upside). What if Apple could somehow buy into this opportunity, given their nearly $50b in cash?

    Again, I’m truly clueless on the real costs involved, but it seems to me something could be done to fix this.

    [ Edited: 27 September 2010 02:28 AM by deagol ]      
  • Posted: 27 September 2010 03:08 AM #26

    deagol - 27 September 2010 05:21 AM

    What if Apple could somehow buy into this opportunity, given their nearly $50b in cash?

    Again, I’m truly clueless on the real costs involved, but it seems to me something could be done to fix this.

    I’m no less clueless but I’ve thought of this as Apple’s next big investment.

    I started a topic on this question back on September 1st called Content Delivery: Apple’s Next Big Venture?

    I consider voice and data services as well entertainment (music and movies) content.

         
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    Posted: 27 September 2010 04:37 AM #27

    DawnTreader - 27 September 2010 06:08 AM

    I consider voice and data services as well entertainment (music and movies) content.

    Once we have 4G networks, what’s the difference between voice, data, and content? I don’t know the technical details, but I do see quality differences between current IP-based solutions and the old cel/sat/land distribution mechanisms. There shouldn’t be any, so what’s the holdup, and does 4G solve this? Pats?

         
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    Posted: 27 September 2010 08:53 AM #28

    deagol - 27 September 2010 07:37 AM
    DawnTreader - 27 September 2010 06:08 AM

    I consider voice and data services as well entertainment (music and movies) content.

    Once we have 4G networks, what’s the difference between voice, data, and content? I don’t know the technical details, but I do see quality differences between current IP-based solutions and the old cel/sat/land distribution mechanisms. There shouldn’t be any, so what’s the holdup, and does 4G solve this? Pats?

    As far as 4G solving problems.  It will definitely improve network capacity where it is deployed, but it will introduce it’s own set of problems especially in the transition.  The dead zones are a result of network topology.  Network coverage is mostly defined by the geographic area, the site and antenna configuration and the propagation environment.  All of these factors result in a system capacity for a geographical area.  Coverage for a single cell is not constant and shrinks or grows based on the number of users.  If the history of wireless is any indication, we have repeatedly demonstrated that capacity is consumed faster then the network buildout so IMO LTE will improved service but we will still have issues.