The Apple iPad And Why I’m Glad I Purchased The 3G Model

  • Posted: 03 October 2010 03:18 AM #31

    rale - 03 October 2010 02:51 AM
    FalKirk - 02 October 2010 09:14 AM
    rattyuk - 02 October 2010 03:42 AM

    The improved GPS is worth the extra even without the activation of the 3G.

    GPS isn’t very important if the WiFi only iPad is not being used while traveling.


    Among it’s many uses, my iPad resides mounted on the dash of my service van where it serves as a GPS to guide me to customers’ homes. I have the grandfathered all-you-can eat data package, which is more than paid for by the savings we realized when trimming our family’s iPhone data plans down to the lowest setting from the original $30 per month.

    It is a great comfort to know that I have web access EVERYTIME I power my iPad up. Five years from now, when wifi or it’s successors blanket our world, this will be a non-issue. But in my neck of the woods, 2010, it is a necessity. And worth every penny.

    Excellent illustration of the uses of an iPad with 3G.  grin

    I don’t desire to dismiss the uses of the Wi-Fi only model. I do suggest for those who are thinking the 3G capability might come in handy to make the additional investment in that model.

         
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    Posted: 03 October 2010 10:52 AM #32

    Haven’t seen this anywhere else.

    What might the impact of iPad with contract be on pricing & sales? Hopefully, it’s offered with and without contracts.

    http://www.hardmac.com/news/2010/09/30/subsidized-ipad-3g-for-the-end-of-the-year

         
  • Posted: 03 October 2010 12:04 PM #33

    Tethering, while alluring, will force your iPhone off unlimited data. At least here in the US with AT&T. I haven’t kept up with the jailbreak community. There was a Tethering method prior to iOS 4, but I’m not sure of it’s current status. And of course this hack only worked with laptops. A jailbreak for iPad may exist that enables Tethering from the iPhone, but I’m hoping Apple has an affordable solution of it’s own.

         
  • Posted: 03 October 2010 03:47 PM #34

    willrob - 03 October 2010 03:04 PM

    Tethering, while alluring, will force your iPhone off unlimited data. At least here in the US with AT&T. I haven’t kept up with the jailbreak community. There was a Tethering method prior to iOS 4, but I’m not sure of it’s current status. And of course this hack only worked with laptops. A jailbreak for iPad may exist that enables Tethering from the iPhone, but I’m hoping Apple has an affordable solution of it’s own.

    Tethering is of interest to some. I’m really not interested in it from a work vantage point. When I need a solution I need it simple and I need it to work. In those situations I don’t mind the $15 monthly 3G service for the iPad that can be turned on and off as needed.

    I’d like to know the percentage of iPhone owners that are actively interesting in tethering. It’s not something I consider a priority but the demand may be something I don’t understand but should appreciate.

         
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    Posted: 03 October 2010 04:07 PM #35

    DawnTreader - 03 October 2010 06:47 PM
    willrob - 03 October 2010 03:04 PM

    Tethering, while alluring, will force your iPhone off unlimited data. At least here in the US with AT&T. I haven’t kept up with the jailbreak community. There was a Tethering method prior to iOS 4, but I’m not sure of it’s current status. And of course this hack only worked with laptops. A jailbreak for iPad may exist that enables Tethering from the iPhone, but I’m hoping Apple has an affordable solution of it’s own.

    Tethering is of interest to some. I’m really not interested in it from a work vantage point. When I need a solution I need it simple and I need it to work. In those situations I don’t mind the $15 monthly 3G service for the iPad that can be turned on and off as needed.

    I’d like to know the percentage of iPhone owners that are actively interesting in tethering. It’s not something I consider a priority but the demand may be something I don’t understand but should appreciate.

    DT I think everyone would like the option to use their data plan across multiple device for free.  Most folks use a router off their fixed broadband and the option is free.  Why other then greed from the carriers should it be different for mobile.  If I pay $25 per month for 2 GB of data why should the carrier then say what device I can use for the data.  It is a classic case of an industry in need of regulation.  Net neutrality should address this issue.  Why do I pay 20 extra for the right to use my data across multiple devices?

         
  • Posted: 03 October 2010 04:32 PM #36

    pats - 03 October 2010 07:07 PM

    DT I think everyone would like the option to use their data plan across multiple device for free.  Most folks use a router off their fixed broadband and the option is free.  Why other then greed from the carriers should it be different for mobile.  If I pay $25 per month for 2 GB of data why should the carrier then say what device I can use for the data.  It is a classic case of an industry in need of regulation.  Net neutrality should address this issue.  Why do I pay 20 extra for the right to use my data across multiple devices?

    Yes, I can’t imagine most users not being happier to have one less bill for bandwidth they’ve already pay for. I’ve been able to get away with the $15 250MB (Rogers) in all months but one. The system does seem silly as I approach the usage limit. I can pull out the iPhone and consume my bytes without worry, pull out my iPad (like I’d prefer) but risk bumping into my limit, or I could have brought along my laptop, tethered it to the phone, and not worried about the bytes that way either. I thought this conversation made sense in this thread because if tethering was allowed, I would likely have gone for the wifi iPad since my iPhone is always with me.

    My initial question here was how does the Playbook get away with tethering without the carriers getting in the way? Is it because there is no exclusive carrier deal? Is it because RIM’s compression and/or lower rich data usage means the carriers give them a break? Or, is it simply because the device won’t be out for several more months and everyone will be allowed to tether by March 2011?

    [ Edited: 03 October 2010 04:35 PM by cranium ]      
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    Posted: 03 October 2010 05:16 PM #37

    I think your last pick is probably the closest to the truth..  I would suspect that the Blackberry tethering will cost an additional amount and since the first version does not include 3G, the carriers need some way to get customers on a mobile data contract.  The playbook is a classic salesmen demo.  Don’t buy my competitors product I will deliver a better device someday.  For companies with a large investment in BES it might work, but the iPhone was already opening the door at the Fortune 500 companies and iPad inherits all that infrastructure.  IMO playbook does not have a release date or price so a company that is interested in tablets would not delay a pilot using iPad just because other companies have tablets coming to market, the key advantage that RIMM might have is in device management and that advantage will soon evaporate as 3rd party vendors deliver solutions this qtr which support Apple’s devices and provide the backend to ensure compliance in regulated industries.

         
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    Posted: 03 October 2010 05:21 PM #38

    DawnTreader - 03 October 2010 06:47 PM
    willrob - 03 October 2010 03:04 PM

    Tethering, while alluring, will force your iPhone off unlimited data. At least here in the US with AT&T. I haven’t kept up with the jailbreak community. There was a Tethering method prior to iOS 4, but I’m not sure of it’s current status. And of course this hack only worked with laptops. A jailbreak for iPad may exist that enables Tethering from the iPhone, but I’m hoping Apple has an affordable solution of it’s own.

    Tethering is of interest to some. I’m really not interested in it from a work vantage point. When I need a solution I need it simple and I need it to work. In those situations I don’t mind the $15 monthly 3G service for the iPad that can be turned on and off as needed.

    I’d like to know the percentage of iPhone owners that are actively interesting in tethering. It’s not something I consider a priority but the demand may be something I don’t understand but should appreciate.

    I would pay a reasonable fee ($10/mo) for the “privilege” of sharing my 3G data connection with an iPad at the very least.  Go ahead and cap the sharing with my iPad if you want.  But I know AT&T will never doing something so blatantly consumer-friendly.  All carriers suffer from this insufferable greed.

    In the meantime, I am not letting go of my unlimited iPhone data.

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  • Posted: 03 October 2010 08:36 PM #39

    Mav - 03 October 2010 08:21 PM

    I would pay a reasonable fee ($10/mo) for the “privilege” of sharing my 3G data connection with an iPad at the very least.  Go ahead and cap the sharing with my iPad if you want.  But I know AT&T will never doing something so blatantly consumer-friendly.  All carriers suffer from this insufferable greed.

    In the meantime, I am not letting go of my unlimited iPhone data.

    There are some definite lock-in opportunities for wireless services providers. I wouldn’t mind a family plan of sorts for digital devices. Register one’s devices and share a pooled quota, buying more service as needed.

         
  • Posted: 06 October 2010 12:14 PM #40

    My solution?
    My Clear hotspot that powers my laptop, my future iPad (holding out for camera), iPhone, and my kids’ iPhone (used as Touch), Touch, PSP, and DS. Works almost everywhere I go for $25 bundled with my home service. For an extra $11 I could have 3G as well as 4g.

    Once the 4G networks and LTE are built out there will be a new technology to imbed in iPads. For now a wifi hotspot gives me flexibility and better speeds.

         
  • Posted: 06 October 2010 12:14 PM #41

    When are Cell carriers going to realize that data plans should be bought for people not devices? *I* already have an AT&T data plan for use with my iPhone. I will not buy another data plan, simply because I have a different device to use it with.

    If I’m not likely to be using both at the same time, why should I have to pay for separate data plans?

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  • Posted: 06 October 2010 12:42 PM #42

    DawnTreader - 01 October 2010 07:54 PM

    Here’s a thought:

    What about the Apple iPad with 3G as a budget alternative to a smartphone? Not everyone is interested in a smartphone with recurring monthly data charges.

    There are millions of potential iPad customers interested first or primarily in an iPad as an electronic book reader. They may or may not have a smartphone and for only $15 per month they can have 3G service as an option.

    This allows a person to continue using a much less expensive voice handset without recurring monthly data fees and the ability to use the 3G capabilities of the Apple iPad when needed or desired.


    That is exactly what my secretary just did this weekend.  She and her husband bought a 3G iPad.  They have no cell phones and don’t really want any.  They also have no functioning computer at home (she used one of our office Macs to set up the iPad.)  What they wanted and got was:  1.  an emergency no-contract cell phone for him to have at work 2.  an easy way to get on the internet 3.  a portable internet and phone connection when they travel.  They may decide to add wi-fi at home (for $10/mo) to their VZ FIOS cable package, or maybe just persuade a friendly neighbor to let them use his wifi network.

         
  • Posted: 06 October 2010 12:46 PM #43

    I finally dropped my iphone after 4 years because of no AT&T 3G service in NM.
    I have an ipad with AT&T 3g for GPS maps and email while in transit, but it’s only Edge in NM.

    Then I got a Verizon MiFi. Hooks up to Verizon 3G and provides 5 wifi connections anywhere. 5 bars wherever I go in NM! WIth my iPad through the MiFi, Whistlephone works great for free. The speed is a little less than DSL.

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  • Posted: 06 October 2010 12:51 PM #44

    Photodan - 06 October 2010 03:14 PM

    When are Cell carriers going to realize that data plans should be bought for people not devices?

    Carriers think of their customers as their opponents. They do everything possible to extort as much money as possible from them. You can recognize a bad customer service organization when they could provide you with more service at no additional cost to themselves, but try to charge you for that service instead. Two examples are cable companies that create arbitrary data speed tiers and Microsoft’s seemingly infinite sub-division of their Windows OS.

         
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    Posted: 06 October 2010 02:17 PM #45

    DawnTreader - 01 October 2010 07:54 PM

    Here’s a thought:

    What about the Apple iPad with 3G as a budget alternative to a smartphone? Not everyone is interested in a smartphone with recurring monthly data charges.

    There are millions of potential iPad customers interested first or primarily in an iPad as an electronic book reader. They may or may not have a smartphone and for only $15 per month they can have 3G service as an option.

    This allows a person to continue using a much less expensive voice handset without recurring monthly data fees and the ability to use the 3G capabilities of the Apple iPad when needed or desired.

    Bingo, that’s me. Having five family phones on Verizon, I just never could justify the cost and hassle of all that it would take to get an iPhone. Along comes the iPad. I pre-ordered my 3G iPad and had it the first day it was available and I have no idea how I got along without it. Not having a smartphone, I use 3G all the time on the iPad. I have it with me everywhere - it’s my connection to the world wherever I go. I’ve found I’ve been able to use it a lot for work. It’s a huge advantage to get a question from a client when I’m not in the office and pull up pertinent files in Dropbox and take care of business. I use it for taking notes in meetings, sketching design ideas, marking up CAD files, as well as all the more common activities. Also, I’m usually able to expense my $15 data charge, so the whole idea of 3G is a no-brainer for me.

    The extra $130 was a pittance due to the fact that I used the proceeds from selling 4 AAPL shares out of a lot that I bought in 1999 for $16.05/share. I got the top-o-the-line iPad for about $60. Well, sorta, I guess. :D

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